Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging Hardcover – May 24, 2016

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- The best price we've seen on Amazon in the past 6 months was on April 3, 2019. The current price is considered average. It is 24% higher than the cost at its lowest.


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currently average price

2% Drop

Updated September 17, 2019

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DatePrice ActionChange %Price Level
16 Sep, 2019Price Drop-1.51%average
15 Sep, 2019Price Drop-0.50%average
7 Sep, 2019Price Drop-19.44%average
2 Sep, 2019Price Increase2.96%highest
29 Aug, 2019Price Increase6.07%high
Update on 17 Sep, 2019

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Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging Hardcover – May 24, 2016

Product Details

  • Amazon.com Sold on
  • 1455566381 Amazon ASIN
  • Categories

    Books, History, Military

Reddit Reviews and Recommendations

  • 8 Reviews
  • Aug. 8, 2019 Last Review Date
  • Feb. 3, 2017 First Seen Review Date
  • 6 Reviewed on Subreddits

    AskMen (2)
    philosophy (2)
    LifeProTips (1)
    environment (1)
    svenskpolitik (1)
    videos (1)

Discussion and Reviews on Reddit

Vad kan Sverige lära sig av Jordaniens flyktingskris? [R]

1 month, 1 week ago_vinpetrol posted submission on svenskpolitik.
Aug. 8, 2019
1 month, 1 week ago_vinpetrol posted comment on svenskpolitik.
Aug. 8, 2019

Jag har inte deltagit i nått krig och har ingen önskan att göra det heller. Jag baserar mitt påstående på vad jag läst. Rekommenderar boken Tribe.

Econtalk podcast om boken: http://www.econtalk.org/sebastian-junger-on-tribe/

Han har även varit på Joe Rogan 2 ggr.

How philosophy helped one soldier with the agonizing ethical decisions on the battlefield [R]

5 months agoSonofNamek posted submission on philosophy.
April 17, 2019
5 months agoSonofNamek posted comment on philosophy.
April 17, 2019

Which is also why many soldiers, IMO, have PTSD.

Well, I'll have to disagree with this opinion. Other than a physiological problem that varies from person to person and therefore, effects how they react to stress, I think the biggest reason for much of what people categorize as "PTSD" comes from the existential dread of returning to society. That is not to say that maybe a few don't experience what you wrote but rather that there's a social aspect that is missing in today's understanding of combat veterans (the topic's article even hints at it).

This video, "Why Veterans Miss War" does a decent job explaining it.

Essentially, many soldiers enjoy war. They don't enjoy the death and decay but they find the adventure and action quite exhilarating. There's a sense of fulfillment being there with your brothers in arms as you fight the enemy that is out to get you.

It's not limited to these recent wars or solely from an American perspective either. I've read/seen WWII veterans, Vietnam veterans, and Iraqi commandos fighting ISIS in the worst of conditions express this sentiment.

In that sense, as the video points out, the soldier returns to a society that doesn't understand that experience. Meanwhile, the soldiers never really get this "best time of your life" type camaraderie back. It is abrupt and culturally shocking to be pushed back into "regular life".

A lot of veterans point to that grocery store scene in the Hurt Locker as being somewhat of an accurate portrayal of what they face when they come home. Such choices being made there seem meaningless compared to the choices being made in combat (or even just taking care of your fellow troops in general).

This becomes even more apparent when the soldiers experience little to no closure. They lose touch with the friends they made, they don't get updated on the outpost they stayed at and the villagers they may have shared tea with, they may have their own guesses but they don't know what will happen to the geopolitical landscape they helped shape.

As a result, depression and feeling isolated can occur. Addiction to drugs, alcohol, or reckless action can be one way to substitute for this emptiness. The trolley problem, as insane as it may seem, that one might experience in war seems much simpler and meaningful than the vast meaninglessness of society.

The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle by WWII vet and philosophy professor Jesse Glenn Gray does a good job explaining the philosophy of wartime experience and I think it's worth checking out alongside the book Tribe by Sebastian Junger (the speaker in the TED talk above).

Philosophy as therapy is an ancient idea, endorsed by Wittgenstein & popularized by self-help books. But the purpose of philosophy -to change the world or simply reconcile us to it- is yet to be decided. [R]

5 months, 3 weeks agoSonofNamek posted submission on philosophy.
March 27, 2019
5 months, 3 weeks agoSonofNamek posted comment on philosophy.
March 27, 2019

Yes, I do believe philosophy serves as a useful reflective therapeutic tool - especially for something like war where you're encompassed with so many different things (boredom, excitement, absurdity, etc) happening at once without being able to filter it out.

Personally, I recommend The Warriors: Reflections on Men in Battle by Jesse Glenn Gray. The author was a philosophy professor and WW2 vet who views much of his past experience through a philosophical lens. I think it served to help him come to terms with some of the things he saw overseas.

And much of his experience can apply to any war. The book is quite similar to Tribe by Sebastian Junger, which details the emptiness troops feel when returning from war.

Under Trump's Tariffs, The US Lost 20,000 Solar Energy Jobs [R]

6 months, 3 weeks agohappybadger posted submission on environment.
Feb. 24, 2019
6 months, 3 weeks agohappybadger posted comment on environment.
Feb. 25, 2019

I honestly don't understand how conservatives can handle this level of cognitive dissonance

Recommended reading. There's a reason the right is so obsessed with culture warrior shit. Humans are deeply susceptible to tribalistic thinking and us-versus-other posturing, things that kept us alive for tens of thousands of years. The right uses wedge issues as totems to build up a 'Murica mythos that's tied to masculinity, heterosexuality, psychonormativity, and racial identity. They can push all the antisocial policy they want as long as their base thinks a vote for R is a vote for being a straight, white male.

Between that and general ignorance/apathy, and holy shit I've never met a population so disengaged and apathetic, you've got a recipe for disaster. There is no reconciliation possible because they see you as a subhuman, there's no reeducation possible because that would require either common media or them picking up books, even violent confrontation is pretty well fucked because they own most of the guns and we're in a 1936 Spain scenario where the right is mostly unified and the left is divided and at-odds with domestic and international media.

Happiness [R]

1 year, 9 months agoNov. 28, 2017

[deleted]

1 year, 9 months agonahnotreallytho posted comment on videos.
Nov. 29, 2017

https://www.amazon.com/Tribe-Homecoming-Belonging-Sebastian-Junger/dp/1455566381/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8

People have done that, over and over throughout the course of modernizing history.

There are, of course, shades of grey. You are falsely attempting to put people in two categories here, 'happy' and 'unhappy', and claiming that anyone not 'building a shelter in the woods and fucking in the mud' would be in 'the unhappy category' by my logic. This is a pretty ridiculous reduction, and does not account for the basic pleasures of survival that are still attainable in a modern society

I highly recommend doing something productive, like reading/listening to a book on a topic that you think about, instead of being an ignorant tool on reddit.

It'll work out way better for you, in the long run.

What's the best non-fiction book you've read? [R]

1 year, 9 months agoFinal-Verdict posted submission on AskMen.
Nov. 22, 2017
1 year, 9 months agoFinal-Verdict posted comment on AskMen.
Nov. 22, 2017

Taken from one of my older comments from the last time someone asked about book recommendations.

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging. I'm starting this comment off with this book because it is, far beyond the shadow of a doubt, the most important book that every man should read. It is primarily meant for soldiers in the US military but god damn dude every fucking male on this planet needs to read this fucking book, plus it's less than 200 pages. If someone comes up to you and tells you that you can only read one more book ever again let it be this one. If you buy any book recommended here today, it absolutely needs to be this one. If you're one of those dudes that is in a sort of "melancholy" where you're not "living" life, you're just sort of "existing", this book can really help you sort things out. Fuck, buy this book even if you're one of the women of /r/AskMen.

Men of Reddit, what's the most influential book you've ever read? [R]

1 year, 10 months agoFinal-Verdict posted submission on AskMen.
Nov. 12, 2017

How did you came upon that book and why it was influential to you?

1 year, 10 months agoFinal-Verdict posted comment on AskMen.
Nov. 12, 2017

Tribe: On Homecoming and Belonging. I'm starting this comment off with this book because it is, far beyond the shadow of a doubt, the most important book that every man should read. It is primarily meant for soldiers in the US military but god damn dude every fucking male on this planet needs to read this fucking book, plus it's less than 200 pages. If someone comes up to you and tells you that you can only read one more book ever again let it be this one. If you buy any book recommended here today, it absolutely needs to be this one. If you're one of those dudes that is in a sort of "melancholy" where you're not "living" life, you're just sort of "existing", this book can really help you sort things out. Fuck, buy this book even if you're one of the women of /r/AskMen.

The book question gets asked from time to time in this subreddit and I actually bought some of the books that people were recommending. Most of them (in my opinion) suck sweaty ass but a few were actually good. Here's a general run down of the books I bought from a thread asking the same question.

From best to worst. Keep in mind that this is just my opinion and shouldn't be treated as the law of the land.

Man's Search for Meaning. Written by a Jewish man who survived Nazi concentration camps. Unlike a lot of concentration camp books it doesn't go over the physical torture aspect of it. He talks about what was going through his mind and the way that other prisoners acted. The talks about his mental state and what got him and others through one of the most devastating crimes against humanity. Craziest part is when they get liberated. The prisoners are allowed to go into the nearby town and most of them think to themselves "this isn't real, this is bullshit" at which point they head back to the concentration camp.

The Tao of Pooh. The author conveys the lessons of Buddhist Taoism through Winnie the Pooh stories he made with commentary in between the stories. Started off good but I skipped the Pooh stories and went straight to the commentary, having to read excerpts that are meant for 3 year olds got old really quick. The book spirals into a steaming pile of shit towards the end. Te author starts inserting personal opinion into the commentary and talking shit on types of people he doesn't like. He talks shit on scientists for studying birds (let the birds be birds), joggers (all that running and they never go anywhere), and people who try to develop cures for diseases (let nature run its course). He tries to back all his opinions up with this totally bullshit story about a Chinese man who lived to be 250 years old. I don't know how sheltered and naive you have to be to think that you can live to 250 by "going for brisk walks" and "eating only vegetables" but the author makes himself look like a complete asshat by putting faith in the story.

The Stranger. The book tries to convey that the universe is indifferent to you and your problems (which it is) but the author presents it in a painfully boring manner.

The Meditations. A Roman emperors diary and notes on stoicism. Super fucking hard to read. "I thank my mother for teaching me motherly things. I thank my father for teaching me fatherly things. I thank my teacher for sharing knowledge. I thank my friends for being there for me." I couldn't make it to page 10. Shit was just too fucking repetitive.

LPT: If something bad happens in your life, don't let it define who you are. Don't make it your excuse for not progressing yourself. Don't undermine it, learn from it, understand it, and let it be apart of you without it being who you are. [R]

2 years, 7 months ago78704dad2 posted submission on LifeProTips.
Feb. 2, 2017

Edit: I just want to say thank you to everyone who got something from this. That's all I wanted and I'm glad I could help a few people out today. :)

2 years, 7 months ago78704dad2 posted on LifeProTips.
Feb. 3, 2017

Remember often times people miss that with trauma there is also Post Traumatic Growth as well, it requires a focus on improvement.

Learning or doing new things is hyper critical to stop Post Traumatic Stress post trauma. Also, there is a book out by Restropo's Sebastian Junger on rituals we had historically post trauma that are absent in modern society to reset the brain and start the new path. https://www.amazon.com/Tribe-Homecoming-Belonging-Sebastian-Junger/dp/1455566381 It is mainly responsible for not seeing the upside of processing and going beyond trauma and tbi.

So it's important that anyone whom experiences trauma to get into a new skill, learning etc and it helps restore functionality as well as growth.