Spam Single Classic, 2.5 Ounce Pouch (Pack of 24)

SPAM

The Price has Dropped! But is it Cheap?

- The best price we've seen on Amazon in the past 12 months was on July 25, 2019. The current price is considered low and a good time to buy. It is 5% higher than the cost at its lowest.


Table of Contents

currently low price

24% Drop

Updated August 21, 2019

Available on

  Amazon

Price Checks

Current price is higher than the price on Jul 25, 2019.
Current price is low in the past 12 months.
Used not available currently.

Price Activity

DatePrice ActionChange %Price Level
13 Aug, 2019Price Drop-24.14%low
9 Aug, 2019Price Increase1.20%high
7 Aug, 2019Price Increase0.78%high
6 Aug, 2019Price Drop-5.22%high
3 Aug, 2019Price Increase5.39%highest
Update on 21 Aug, 2019

Amazon.com price change % swings above and below average price

Showing: Area under 0 show price is cheaper than average. Above 0 shows higher price than average.
Spam Single Classic, 2.5 Ounce Pouch (Pack of 24)

Product Details

  • Amazon.com Sold on
  • B000FIZW00 Amazon ASIN
  • SPAM Brand
  • 44962 Model Number
  • Categories

    Spiced Meat, Meat, Poultry & Seafood, Grocery & Gourmet Food, Canned, Jarred & Packaged Foods

Reddit Reviews and Recommendations

  • 10 Reviews
  • April 18, 2018 Last Review Date
  • Dec. 3, 2013 First Seen Review Date
  • 7 Reviewed on Subreddits

    trailmeals (3)
    keto (2)
    Frugal (1)
    Ultralight (1)
    Weakendgunnit (1)
    outdoorgear (1)
    vinyl (1)

Discussion and Reviews on Reddit

/r/Ultralight Discussion - Week of April 16, 2018 [R]

1 year, 4 months agojmp485 posted submission on Ultralight.
April 16, 2018

Have something you want to discuss but don't think it warrants a whole post? Please use this thread to discuss recent purchases, trips, or questions for the community at large.

1 year, 4 months agojmp485 posted comment on Ultralight.
April 18, 2018

[24-Pack of SPAM Singles] (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000FIZW00/ref=cmswrcpapa_0Ua2Ab431YT75) <$17 on Amazon

Im having a really hard time sticking to keto for any length of time. Any advice appreciated. [R]

1 year, 10 months agoOct. 17, 2017

[deleted]

1 year, 10 months agoUnlikeSpace3858 posted comment on keto.
Oct. 17, 2017

Spam single serving is so simple, stores on the shelf, and you can eat it right out of the pouch. Or hit up your GNC or shop online and invest in a good jug of protein powder, lasts a long time, only needs water if you don't have anything else on hand to mix with it. Even Quest Bars could get you through a meal. There are always fast food bunless burger options if you're on the go. You know what else will keep you in ketosis if you don't have time to grab a keto meal, not eating. Many who eat keto also intermittent fast, which means planning only one or two meals a day. So many options available to stay on course, if you really want to reach the finish line. Stop getting distracted by detours, you're just pushing your starting line further back.

Newbie asking about gear and sharing my experience [R]

2 years, 8 months agocircutree posted submission on outdoorgear.
Dec. 14, 2016

Disclaimer: I am dictating this on my phone. Bound to have a few lapses in gramma. Also sorry for wall of text because of a terrible combination of attention deficit disorder and formatting regulations that I can't be bothered to study. Also - I ramble

Okay everybody, I got bit by the bug pretty hard after allowing a decade of wanting to travel but never doing so with the exception of a few trips to Bonnaroo, a few good hikes in the Smokies, and the north west coast of Ireland (that first-gen American son returned-status, with access to very rough camping/kayaking and small skiff gear compared to the settings) and getting drunk in Florida because that's what you do in Florida in your twenties. Anyways, I hit 30 in September it's so I guess if I'm going to go into an early midlife crisis- I'll do what I've always wanted to do and get the fuck far away from Walmart as possible. What I am hoping to hear back from ya'll is suggestions on gear for somebody looking to kayak long distances and has the resources to send gear ahead ( a whole other thing I have to figure out down the road) if I were to undertake a longer Journey. I know this is taking forever but I'm super into this. Thank you for bearing with me.

My friend invited me to go hike part of the Appalachian Trail with him and a friend over Thanksgiving weekend. Not wanting to sit to another Thanksgiving as a single 30 year old nephew/cousin/ second cousin , I agreed to what was originally supposed to be a 15 mile trip over 3 days. We ended up doing 27 miles.

I was fortunate enough to have access to my boss's camping gear - which was what I considered to be the equivalent of Bruce Wayne's personal camping stash. And further grateful for my friend taking the time to go over my pack at our campsite at Elkmont before we hiked Sweat Heifer to The Jump Off and camped at Icy-Something Shelter and we zigzagged towards Mount LeConte but didn't get to the top and we were filming stuff and trying to get different shots at different times of day, so we did a lot of backtracking- sorry that stream-of-consciousness kicked in. If I had to do all of this with nearly a 70-pound pack - which after 12 years of rugby and then about 6 years of relative physical neglect, would have been I'll absolutely terrible experience given our final mileage. My friend saved my spine and thighs.

Some of this gear I brought and was able to drop because my friend had the same or better and some I just really dug both aesthetically and functionally. I also I'm straight-up patting myself on the back for coming up with something I've been doing for festivals but then discovered is already super saturated among the different Outfitters. More on that later.

The gear I dug: - Love the jetboil. There was a burn - ban on (We hiked in when the fire at Chimney Tops was still at one acre) so being able to basically boil what I think was 2 quarts in about 5 minutes was great.

-Forget the brand - but the inflatable sleeping Pad was amazing except for the fact that it was too slick and I slid off it very easily. The thickness of the sleeping bag and my layering provided enough cushion as is. Very light and compact. Open to suggestions.

-I brought a bunch of zip ties, paracord and a few bungees to bind my shit ( to be further read as clothing and other things that require being rolled up and assorted lights attached to shoulder straps and inside shelters)

  • My boss had a little collapsible chair basically made out of tent poles that you had to put into place. It was a cool concept but I didn't end up using it very much. The shelters had benches and we were walking around trying to keep warm and film until right before bed.

  • I overdid it on the HotHands. I bought about 25- Only needed 8. Gave the others to my friends. The jetboil comes in handy here as I was able to fill a rubber hot-water bottle ( old, European people in the winter/sick thing).

-Our water supply the first night was really good - I brought three large nalgenes and a bladder that had made it through many Bonnaroos. I dropped that one because I didn't like how it sit on my back and opted to just carry in the Nalgene bottles but I'm not graceful and even bungied, the amount of sway they create was noticeable. I forget the name of the pump I had but it was about three-quarters the size of a single serving French press and I just geared for the same amount of space that would take up, the three jetboil fuels that I had would get it where I need it. Open to water purification suggestions.

  • I got some $7 Triple-A battery powered Christmas lights at Target. They were awesome at the shelter because you could cook and not fumble around with a headlamp. I checked with him other people camping there that night before I started redecorating. Everybody dug it. I liked that they were the soft white bulbs with special Tops on them to avoid that harsh LED beam and give us a nice warm ambient light for an area 18 feet by 12 feet or thereabouts for both shelters.

  • 4 different size dry sacks. Awesome immediately being able to identify which one is which for a person with issues organizing like me.

  • I wear wool socks whenever so luckily I had a bunch of those ready. Always have wool socks available. Open to moisture wicking clothing options for skinny fat guys in training.

  • Because I'm a dork, I thought the Moji Black Diamond LED Lantern was the shit! I strapped it on my shoulder and felt like Tony Stark in the woods. The folding hooks are great and allow it to be easily hung or tied. The weight and compactness was also awesome. I love lighting suggestions and anything super-bright and lightweight module or rope form I would love to see.

  • I'd like to know of a good lightweight strong box or something I could use to put my tin and brass penny whistles and jaw-harp in. I know. I'm an Irish redneck. If luxury were an option in the tube-shaped strongbox Market, maybe I could get a few colored pencils in as well. Anybody customize your own art supplies to bring out? I brought a few notecards and did small drawings.

  • Adderall - highly recommended for mildly overweight former college club-level athletes which one fucked up knee and moobs. Trade-off is you gotta have access to water. I was worried about my heart exploding send and did not have any work-related task ahead of me so I did half my prescribed dosage and even that was more than you need once you just accept that "yes" - there is going to be another crest and then that awesome moment hits where you realize you're doing better on your feet the next day with none of it in your system because you didn't need it and you're still outpacing the the vet hikers that brought you and you feel like you kick ass again a little bit. That was one of those cool moments. That's the kind of moment that makes me want to get back into the woods.

  • Having a musical instrument in the black of night was pretty cool. Tried to convince my friend to bring his little backpack guitar or mandolin thought he already had his cameras and mic shit. I'm decent with small instruments. Do full-sounding camping harmonicas exist?

  • I brought some dried salami because I'm a fat ass and need my salty meat but I don't like Jerky. Any chefs or those that like to eat exceedingly well on the trail with minimal ingredients please get at me. I'll carry dried meats and spices all day. I got rum to fight off the rickets. We also had instant mashed potatoes which filled and warmed us. That was a good call for Thanksgiving, along with the Turkey Spam and cranberry granola. My friends other buddy also brought a bunch of cans but I'm glad he was carrying that shit and not me. I could get just as full off bihon noodles and hydrated meat. Suggestions on vegetable options are appreciated .

  • I had two Gerber knives: a Remix Tactical and a Paraframe with a fine edge. I only really used them cooking and tying gear. I prefer a Tanto blade- I learned how to sharpen them well years ago but never sought out nicer knives to buy- recommendations wanted for fine edges.

  • Fireball Cinnamon Whiskey and hot chocolate, a large tin can for cigarette butts, cliff bar wrappers, hot hands and other trash. They can be crushed when moving sites and then opened again. Holy fuck do we make a lot of garbage just moving one place to another.

-Things I wish I had done differently.

At the distilleries in Gatlinburg they give out samples. Don't drink a bunch of them the night before your first hike. I learned this.

  • I hijacked super protein packed things that my boss had made in his freezer called "Crack Bars". I discovered the very first day why he kept them in the freezer - I had a bag full of ingredients with the consistency of sand and peanut butter. Still tasted amazing but I'm weird about people reaching their hands into bags of things that I'm eating. Shades of Howard Hughes abound. Would love some recipes for somebody that does not like to hike on a full stomach but does like to sleep on one.

  • Had some sort of freeze-dried crap. One was a chicken piccata and the other was Stew or something and they both tasted terrible. Was not worth the space they took up in the pack.

Other questions and musings from an idiot.

  • What you got to keep me regular on the trail? Despite my Howard Hughes tendencies, I'm not squeamish about shiting in the woods. I'm good at it.

  • Is it frowned upon to bury flushable wipes? They are my new favorite thing for Festivals and it would be awesome if they don't fuck up the environment (beyond the tree they were) like everything else.

  • Benadryl or steroid packet recommendations for somebody that is highly sensitive to spider bites. I discovered last year that if you get stung in the head by eight wasps, I have a window of five minutes before I can't even see to get the Benadryl. That was a shitty day of gutter-cleaning. Is there anything I can buy as a civilian that's like a shot in the neck? I'm not diagnosed allergic to anything, but I have to take the day off work at least once or twice a year for a black widow or brown recluse bite here in my Nashville basement.

  • Any Nashville or Middle Tennesse-area hikers Willing to recommend some out-of-the-way spots within 50 miles of Nashville?

  • What are some really durable ducky kayaks and what is a kayak for somebody that wanted to do long stretches as far as he could for an intermediate kayaker? Setups for fishing would be an awesome bonus.

  • Hammocks- Just tell me which one to get that's light and warm.

-Those NASA blankets- worth a shit? Let me know.

  • I try to avoid carrying gear with bigger than AAA batteries. Would be great to hear Solar charging panel and dynamo product suggestions for phones and USB-powered devices. Did not need one on this trip. I'm a realtor and I have a bunch of those promotional power banks strewn about my place but they are only good for 2 charges or so.

  • I'll say this - it's been long overdue for me and that is not very frequently that I get so into something that I'd write something like this. I just want to get out there as often and as far as possible and I want to do it the best way I can. Certain parts of my job are

2 years, 8 months agocircutree posted on outdoorgear.
Dec. 15, 2016

Also: Spam and eggs on the trail is just about the most heavenly start to a day of heavy hiking.

I don't even have my table yet... Send Help. [R]

2 years, 8 months agochupathingy99 posted submission on vinyl.
Dec. 12, 2016
2 years, 8 months agochupathingy99 posted on vinyl.
Dec. 13, 2016

I tried to listen to that airplane/ocean album, but I never got into it. Everyone kept short-stroking it like it's the best thing since single serving spam packets. Am I missing something?

P.S. Those spam things are depressingly real.

5-day trip plus 2 days flying - meal suggestions? [R]

3 years, 1 month agoreggae_muffin posted submission on trailmeals.
July 7, 2016

Heading to Iceland to hike the Laugevegur on the 19th by way of LA. Will arrive on the 21st and will either begin that day or early the next. I may not have access to a refrigerator for 7 days and would like some suggestions on what to take for the 2 days of travel and 5 days of trail. Many thanks!

3 years, 1 month agoreggae_muffin posted on trailmeals.
July 9, 2016

Trail staples like peanut butter, Nutella, trail mix, hard candies/chocolates will all keep really well without refrigeration. Things like Spam Singles and tuna singles are really shelf stable and versatile. Instant oatmeal is also an easy breakfast and pretty negligible in terms of weight, especially since all you need is some hot water. I like taking instant polenta for the same reason - fills you up, takes 3 minutes to cook and is great with some salami or cheese mixed in.

There's also a supermarket chain in Iceland called Bonus and there are quite a few of them around the place. They have a huge selection of things like salami and hard cheeses which were staples of what I carried while I was there (spent 3.5 weeks hiking/camping the whole country basically). Tortillas are light and easy to pack and would definitely last you a week.

Original Packaging [R]

3 years, 3 months agoFirearm_Nut posted submission on Weakendgunnit.
May 20, 2016

No cook meals [R]

3 years, 3 months agoreggae_muffin posted submission on trailmeals.
May 18, 2016

Hey guys - I'm looking to plan some weekend trips but don't have a stove or a grill and don't really want to mess around with cooking. Any ideas on some high-energy/cheap no cook meals? Not looking to spend a ton of time making them. Any help is appreciated!

3 years, 3 months agoreggae_muffin posted on trailmeals.
May 21, 2016

String cheese or other hard cheeses like parmesan or sealed like Baby Bels, crackers of various kinds, granola bars, Cliff bars, tortillas, single serve packets of things like mustard/mayo/ketchup/salt&pepper/peanut butter/jam, jelly or honey, Spam singles or tuna singles, dried fruit or fruit leather, nuts, chocolate or other sweets like dummies and candies, hard veggies like carrots travel well, hard salami or other cured meat and jerky, Goldfish crackers, cookies

Keto foods for backpacking? [R]

4 years, 4 months agoreggae_muffin posted submission on keto.
April 21, 2015

A couple of weeks ago, I went on a 2 day, 16-mile hike. Packing food was challenging, since most of what I eat on a day-to-day basis is perishable.

I ended up eating cheese, summer sausage, and nuts. That worked great for a 2-day trip. But I think that if I had to eat nothing but that for another day I would have gagged on it.

So, what are some other dense, non-perishable keto foods?

4 years, 4 months agoreggae_muffin posted on keto.
April 22, 2015

In terms of food I usually bring stuff like hard boiled eggs, hard cheeses, salami, Spam singles, single tuna or salmon packs, peanut butter, low-carb energy bars, jerky (i also sometimes get dried squid or shrimp from the asian cooking store near me), nuts, low carb tortillas, kale chips, seaweed snacks, single use condiment packages like mayo and mustard and parmesan cheese from fast food joints, pate and other spreads, sometimes I like to make my own fat bombs as well.

For drinks - peppermint tea bags, instant coffee, sugar-free Mio drops. Breaks up the monotony of just water depending on how long you're going out for.

My back country camping meals. Need a little assistance on breakfast [R]

5 years, 7 months agoCassandraVindicated posted submission on trailmeals.
Jan. 19, 2014

It took a while to find an economical, but nutritious, easily packable, easily disposable, fairly lite meal. My friends and I came up with: Flavored Rice Packs ($1.00) at any grocery store. Packs of Tuna (1.00 for 4 oz) at any grocery store. Packs of Olive oil ($.35) these are really hard to find. Supplemental snacks are usually Cliff Protein bars. Right now we are playing with the breakfast. We tried oatmeal, but the clean up is horrible. I am wondering if anyone has suggestions. As this is what we camp with a meal sits at $2.35 and the 3 meals per day were coming in at 2500+ calories. Again, looking for a well rounded breakfast the is cheap, nutritious, easily packable, and the clean up and garbage is minimal. Thanks

5 years, 5 months agoCassandraVindicated posted on trailmeals.
March 22, 2014

They are very cheap on Amazon

Amazon: What do you buy on there that is a better value than Walmart or eBay? [R]

5 years, 8 months agoDec. 3, 2013

This is inspired by the post about Amazon Prime. Reading the responses I was intrigued by the fact that so many of you use Amazon.

Whenever I'm shopping for an item I always check Amazon, but end up purchasing at either Walmart or eBay because the prices are better. What products do you buy on Amazon that represents a better value on Amazon?

Edit: I understand convenience is a part... I didn't know if there were specific products /r/frugal was buying that are a better value. It appears there is not, it is all about convenience. I say go with it, I love Amazon, just wondering if I had missed the boat on something.

5 years, 8 months agoCassandraVindicated posted on Frugal.
Dec. 3, 2013

I buy boxes of individual Spam in the retort pouch. Each one is 3oz. and the perfect shape to make a sandwich out of. They are great for camping or pulling over on a long car ride and cooking up some quick food. Last I checked, they were cheaper than anywhere else and buying in bulk gets them cheaper than the cans with more convenience.