Sleeping, Dreaming, and Dying: An Exploration of Consciousness Paperback – May 1, 2002

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Discussion and Reviews on Reddit

Questions About Anatta [R]

2 weeks, 6 days agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Nov. 7, 2019

Hello, everyone. I have some questions about anatta, one of the three marks of existence.

It is my understanding that anatta means "no self" or "non-self." In other words, the doctrine is that there is no such thing as an unchanging, permanent self.

With this in mind, some questions emerge.

1) What is "self" taken to mean? Does it mean a physical vessel, i.e. the body? Does it mean an individual self, i.e. the ego? Does it mean the soul, i.e. an essence that continues to exist after death? Or does it mean something entirely different, i.e. some ultimate reality?

2) If there is no such thing as an unchanging, permanent self, then what does Buddhism have to say about a changing, impermanent self? Can there be such a thing as a changing, impermanent soul? And, what is it exactly that is reborn because of the accumulation of karma, if not a soul?

3) Keeping in mind the response to question 2, I am aware that some sects of Buddhism might posit that Nirvana, the Deathless, the Dharmakaya, etc. may constitute the "true self" or some "ultimate reality." While such sects may not use such terminology, it is my understanding that this is how some such sects operate. Are such sects' assertions—that Nirvana, the Deathless, the Dharmakaya, etc. are the "true self" or "ultimate reality"—in line with the doctrine of anatta?

Thank you all for your answers. I hope to gain a greater understanding on the doctrine of anatta.

2 weeks, 5 days agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Nov. 8, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


B. Alan Wallace: "Some views of the soul assert the unchanging, independent identity of the individual. Rather than such a soul, Buddhist contemplatives have discovered, through close inspection of the mind in deep meditation, a continuum of consciousness, or "mind stream." This stream is a series of arising and passing moments of awareness. No single, unchanging identity bridging these moments is observed, and because this mind stream is influenced by various phenomena, it is interdependent rather than independent. One might be tempted to equate this mind stream, the substrate consciousness, with the individual or self, or say that each individual "has" such a mind stream. However, since no independent entity is observed gluing together the moments of awareness of the substrate consciousness, calling it "the self" is arbitrary.

Through direct experience in meditation, it has been seen repeatedly that the psyche, with its thoughts, emotions, sensations, and so forth, emerges from the substrate consciousness [mind stream]. The psyche is indeed conditioned by the body and the physical senses, but its source is this immaterial mind stream. This view, by the way, shares certain features with the theories of Pythagoras, Socrates, Origen, Augustine, and William James, and it is also compatible with all that is currently known about mind-brain interactions." https://www.amazon.com/Embracing-Mind-Common-Science-Spirituality/dp/159030683X/

The concept of Anatta and reincarnation [R]

2 months, 1 week agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Sept. 19, 2019

Probably a dumb question since I don't know much but so if we have no soul, what's the part that makes us "us" when we reincarnate in the next lives? Perhaps, if we die and go to apaya or sugati planes except for our plane ofc, do we remember our past lives?

2 months, 1 week agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Sept. 19, 2019

Supposedly, each sentient being has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

Question on no-self and awakening [R]

2 months, 1 week agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Sept. 16, 2019

Hello everyone! I have a question with regards to the "no-self" doctrine.

If we consider impermanence, we come to the realization that there exists nothing that can be called "self" or "ego", as the existence of such implies something to be unchanging. I understand this (or at least think I do). Therefore, we are just a collection, an aggregate, of matter and mental constructions, everchanging, never the same in two different instants.

So, just exactly what awakens? Or, more to the point, what is awakening, the achievement of nirvana if there is no one the awaken? In a similar vein, how does it make sense to talk about rebirth? What is reborn? Am I understanding the no-self doctrine erroneously?

Thanks in advance!

2 months, 1 week agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Sept. 16, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

Understanding No-Self and Reincarnation [R]

2 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Sept. 8, 2019

Hey everyone! I hope everything is going well! I figured I would ask the community here about some confusions I was having about the concept of no-self existing at the same time as reincarnation. How do different sects of Buddhism explain this? Thank you!

2 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Sept. 8, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

Soul and reencarnation [R]

3 months agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Aug. 29, 2019

Hey there! So I'm trying to understand the budhist notion of the soul and reencarnation but Ive been struggling with it. I cant seem to understand: budhists dont believe there is a soul or anything objective and permanent for that matter (like the hindus believe theres a permanent atman that connects the different lifes of an individual throught samsara) so in the buddhist idea of reencarnation what connects this life to the next? What makes the next being Ill reeincarnate in connected to this present life in any way if there isnt a permanent and individual soul to make that connection? Thanks in advance

3 months agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Aug. 29, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

If there is no self, how can you be reborn? [R]

3 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Aug. 12, 2019
3 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Aug. 12, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

Does ones soul constantly get reincarnated? What happens after a person ends the cycle of reincarnation? [R]

3 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
Aug. 9, 2019

I’m a newbie here, don’t know too much about Buddhism.

3 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
Aug. 9, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a continuum of consciousness called mind-stream (citta-santana) -- a "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

proof of non self and rebirth? [R]

6 months agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
May 29, 2019

i've kind of hit a roadblock with my practice. i've been reading through the pali cannon sutras after finishing old path white clouds and i am still a little confused and would be grateful if someone smarter could shed some light on this issue.

how do we know how rebirth works?

my problems with religions has always been that in order to definitely know what happens after you die, you have to die. that doesn't leave alot of room left over for speculation from 1st parties in my experience. in old path white clouds the buddha tells children stories of his past life as an animal and a tree and i don't get it. if theres no self, how can you remember your past lives? if theres no self, how are there persistent traits that carry on through lives? i realize that not all buddhists (especially not all schools) accept the concept of certain 'personality traits' being passed on through your lives, but even then the concept of karmic balances and repercussions in future lives. isn't that a self?

my current concept of buddhism and non self that i accept is that there really is no self. through co interdependence, we are all just happy little accidents. when you die, its anyones best guess. the concept of a christian afterlife is just as concrete as a buddhist version in my mind. i feel like the idea of rebirth and karma displace the idea of nonself as i understand it.

at the end of the day i'm going to continue my practice and try not to talk my self in circles, but this is something that consistently pops up in my head as a paradox and even after reading suttas on nonself and using the searchbar i still havent gotten a really clear answer. appreciate all answers, thank you for your time.

6 months agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
May 29, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" that keeps going; it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

What reincarnates if the Buddha says that we have no soul? [R]

6 months agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
May 26, 2019
6 months agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
May 26, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" that keeps going; it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

Can anybody help with my "no soul" brain block? [R]

6 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
May 15, 2019

I have been drawn to Buddhism for a years... knowing my beliefs aligned with more eastern views since I was 5 years old... even though I was raised Catholic I always told my parents I believed in reincarnation before I understood there was a word for reincarnation. I have spent a lot of time learning what I can and Buddhism aligns with my beliefs... but the one portion that I still can't wrap my head aund is the belief that there is no soul. I am trying to understand, have listened to and read many explanations, but there is a block.... I get anxiety thinking I don't have one. This has been what stops me in the past. But now I feel a very strong push to move past my thought system and do what I can to understand, or start the path of understanding.

Can anybody help me to understand better.

6 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
May 15, 2019

Supposedly, each person has a "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" that keeps going: it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

Help on how non-self, rebirth, and karma work together. [R]

6 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
May 13, 2019

So I recently read someone mention the difference between reincarnation and rebirth. Reincarnation being Hinduism (rebirth of soul in new body) and rebirth being Buddhism. But even more surprisingly, I learned about non-self. As in, there's no soul or anything about a person that persists through death and gets re-implanted into a new body.

This changes my entire conception of Buddhism - basically everything I've seen/heard/learned about it (from life encounters mainly, I haven't actually researched it per se). This includes the usage of the phrase "past lives", jokes in media about "someone you F'd over in a previous life" or "accumulating good karma so you aren't reborn as a cockroach". Either I missed something, or Buddhism is majorly misunderstood by non-Buddhists.

So basically my questions are:

If there is no soul, or self, or anything about *you* that persists after death, what exactly is "re" born?

Is it just another human/animal, completely unrelated to you in every way? Wouldn't this make the phrase "past lives" and "previous lives" nonsensical?

How does karma get compiled/distributed after someone dies?

a) is there some kind of cosmic karmic log book? (I think I read this on a wiki, even though someone said no)

b) if there's no *you* after death, there's really no punishment for having bad karma, right? I previously thought your karma followed you everywhere like bad credit or something, encouraging people to do good things so they could get reborn in more privileged circumstances, ie to better themselves. Someone told me it's to benefit the next person in line, but I guess I'm too cynical to believe people act in such a completely selfless way.

c) does the next human in line inherit all of the previous person's karma, or is karma somehow collected and distributed some other way? Could someone potentially inherit a previous person's lifetime collection of bad karma and end up as a roach or in some kind of hell?

Please excuse any blatantly ignorant assumptions or misconceptions. I have tried googling some answers, but most of what I can find is either full of flowery language or doesn't really offer me a satisfying answer. Thanks!

6 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
May 13, 2019

Supposedly, an individual's "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" keeps going: it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

If there's nothing that qualifies as a self then what is being reborn? [R]

6 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
May 12, 2019

That is a question that is often asked and I think that by making it it's own topic, we could gather a lot of good awnsers. Bring on your thoughts, The wise words of your teacher And the sutras. Let discuss it and find a explanation in detail and one that we could give a person that has the first contact to buddhism !.

6 months, 2 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
May 12, 2019

Supposedly, an individual's "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" keeps going: it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

What is reborn if there is no self? [R]

7 months, 1 week agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
April 22, 2019

The lack of self makes a ton of sense to me. The self is an illusion and there is no single entity that constitutes anyone's self. Got it! Rebirth makes less sense... especially if the self does not exist. I can't understand what is taught to be reborn if the self is an illusion. Is "my" seed of unadulterated conscious awareness the entity that is reborn? Why is this seed of awareness punished or rewarded for the things it merely witnessed in past lives?

I'd love to hear your understanding or see some sources that can help me understand. I find Buddhism so attractive, but I can't get past this part.

Thank you friends!

7 months, 1 week agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
April 23, 2019

Supposedly, an individual's "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" keeps going: it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

Impermanence and life everlasting [R]

7 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
April 10, 2019

In the Bhagavad Gita, Krishna teaches that the soul lives forever. I've learned that Buddhists hold that all things are subject to impermanence. The soul then, must also be subject to impermanence, right?

7 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
April 10, 2019

According to Buddhism, each person has an individual "mind stream" (also called "mental continuum" or "continuum of consciousness"): "It is this stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." The mindstream is persistent but "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."

"If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." - The Dalai Lama http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm

Supposedly, the mind stream is impermanent (changing moment by moment) and without beginning or end:

"Any individual mental continuum has no beginning and no end. But, each mental continuum can have two phases. One phase is the samsaric phase, when that mental continuum undergoes uncontrollably recurring rebirth under the influence of confusion about reality, and therefore is filled with the various forms of suffering. This first phase has no beginning, but can have an end. The second phase is the nirvanic or liberated phase, when that mental continuum continues to manifest birth and death, but totally free of confusion about reality, so that it contains no suffering at all. This second phase will have a beginning, but no end." - Alex Berzin https://studybuddhism.com/en/advanced-studies/lam-rim/impermanence-death/the-place-of-rebirth-in-buddhism

What does Buddhism say about people who are born with disabilities or diseases? Is that a result of bad karma in a past life? [R]

7 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted submission on Buddhism.
April 8, 2019

I’ve dabbled in Buddhism on and off for a couple years, and lately my newfound vegan lifestyle and increased compassion for all life brought me back to thinking about Buddhism.

The only thing I feel like I can’t accept at all is a view that states that people deserve to be born into bad situations or bad health, etc. I work with people who have neurological disabilities and I value them the same way I would value a typical person without disabilities. I would not be able to accept any view that states karma has led these people to their disorders.

7 months, 3 weeks agomindroll posted comment on Buddhism.
April 8, 2019

So attributing a child's disability or lack there of to past karmic actions of said child is simply nonsense as far as Buddhism is concerned.

The suttas that I quoted above clearly mention a karmic cause of illnesses. While you're free to dismiss them as nonsense, Buddhist scholar Bhikkhu Bodhi spoke of his chronic debilitating headaches: "I accept this painful condition as a present-life reflection of some unwholesome karma I created in the past. Not that I would advise someone who develops a painful illness to immediately resign themselves to it. Although it may be the inevitable fruit of some past karma, it might also be the result of a present cause that can be effectively eliminated by proper medical treatment. However, when various types of treatment fail to help with an obstinate and defiant condition, one can be pretty sure there is a karmic factor. Personally, I don’t lose sleep trying to figure out what this past karma might have been, and I would advise others against succumbing to such obsessive concerns." https://www.lionsroar.com/built-in-buddha/

one of the most fundamental teachings that their is no separate identity. There no I. No soul. Nothing of the sort.

Supposedly, there's an individual "mind stream" (also called "mental continuum" or "continuum of consciousness"): "It is this stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." The mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."

The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm

Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

The dhammic view of karma is not like this and is simply talking about the moment to moment expression of your experience and life.

Although Westerners find it more appetizing to think of the six realms of rebirth as metaphorical, the traditional presentation is not about psychological states that we go through daily in this life: "on the break-up of the body, after death... he/she is sickly wherever reborn."

"Traditionally Buddhist cultures have treated the Wheel of Life as representative of a real cosmology, wherein the six realms are actual, objective destinies into which one might be born. In this view the six realms represent six different kinds of environment, physical body, and mental state that we might occupy based on karma from past lives.... This way of looking at the Wheel of Life presupposes belief in reincarnation and multiple planes of physical reality. It will likely be difficult for people who are not from traditionally Buddhist cultures to adopt this view.

On the other hand, we can look at the six realms as a creative and fruitful way of describing the circumstances of our day-to-day realities. From this point of view the realms are seen as psychological landscapes that we migrate through over time; the realms are our internal mood, our attitudes, and habitual patterns projected out onto the world, where we mistake them for reality." http://www.wisdompubs.org/book/awakening-daydream/introduction

Rebirth [R]

8 months, 3 weeks agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
March 10, 2019

what is it that gets rebirthed?

8 months, 3 weeks agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
March 11, 2019

Supposedly, an individual's "continuum of consciousness" or "mind stream" keeps going: it is the "stream of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth." This mindstream is "impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

What is incarnate if not Self? [R]

10 months, 1 week agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
Jan. 22, 2019

I would like to understand how reincarnation is understood in relation to anatta.

10 months, 1 week agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
Jan. 22, 2019

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

mindstream: The mental continuum of the causally connected [by causes] flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

krodha: "The mindstream as a continuum persists from lifetime to lifetime. It is impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

If there is no self, then what accumulates kharma, and what gets reincarnated? [R]

1 year, 3 months agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
Aug. 22, 2018

I’m reading “what the Buddha taught, and I’m in the chapter about the “no-soul.” I understand that our “consciousness” is comprised of constant streams of sensations and thoughts, and is therefore impermanent. How does that fit in with kharma and reincarnation? I’m confused.

The author offers this explanation, but I still don’t understand: “According to the Buddha's teaching, it is as wrong to hold the opinion 'I have no self' (which is the annihilationist theory) as to hold the opinion 'I have self' (which is the eternalist theory), because both are fetters, both arising out of the false idea T A M ' . The correct position with regard to the question of Anatta is not to take hold of any opinions or views, but to try to see things objectively as they are without mental projections, to see that what we call T, or 'being', is only a combination of physical and mental aggregates, which are working together interdependently in a flux of momentary change within the law of cause and effect, and that there is nothing permanent, everlasting, unchanging and eternal in the whole of existence. Here naturally a question arises: If there is no Atman or Self, who gets the results of karma (actions) ? No one can answer this question better than the Buddha himself. When this question was raised by a bhikkhu the Buddha said: 'I have taught you, O bhikkhus, to see conditionality everywhere in all things.'1 The Buddha's teaching on Anatta, No-Soul, or No-Self, should not be considered as negative or annihilistic. Like Nirvana, it is Truth, Reality; and Reality cannot be negative. It is the false belief in a non-existing imaginary self that is negative. T h e teaching on Anatta dispels the darkness of false beliefs, and produces the light of wisdom. It is not negative: as Asanga very aptly says: 'There is the fact of No-selfness' (nairatmyastita).2”

1 year, 3 months agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
Aug. 22, 2018

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

mindstream: The mental continuum of the causally connected [by causes] flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

krodha: "The mindstream as a continuum persists from lifetime to lifetime. It is impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

According to the Anatta/Anatman doctrine, it is believed that humans don't have souls. Then what is it within us that leaves the body when we die and become reborn or attain Nirvana? Consciousness? [R]

1 year, 3 months agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
Aug. 7, 2018
1 year, 3 months agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
Aug. 8, 2018

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

mindstream: The mental continuum of the causally connected [by causes] flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

u/krodha: "The mindstream as a continuum persists from lifetime to lifetime. It is impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

how does reincarnation work if there is no permanent self? [R]

1 year, 4 months agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
July 31, 2018
1 year, 3 months agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
Aug. 1, 2018

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

mindstream: The mental continuum of the causally connected [by causes] flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

u/krodha: "The mindstream as a continuum persists from lifetime to lifetime. It is impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."


The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm


Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime... The mind is a series of mental acts ... a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness... Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity... However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end... The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm


Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body... The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

What is rebirth and reincarnation [Does Buddhist Tradation Believe In It] [R]

1 year, 4 months agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
July 9, 2018

So, I am a Sikh, and we follow the Dharmic faith, we are similar to other Dharmic faiths such as Karma, Reincarnation and we believe in liberation which is mukti, and at the end we believe that our "soul" (I just think of it as consciousness) merges back with God, but beliefs in a God or Creator is different among these Dharmic faiths. For me Buddhism is confusing and a misunderstood religion for me. Hell, I thought that the Buddha was a fat man, but I realised he was from a Chinese Folktale with a similar name, but wasn't like him, and I thought Buddha was a deity to be worshipped, but that was wrong. I understand that reincarnation a soul goes from one body to another body, but in Buddhism it is different. They believe in a new form after death, but minus the soul. It is confusing me because people have different views for example, Western Buddhists tend to be more secular and believe that there is no rebirth and such I guess to accompany their secular beliefs I am not sure. For native Buddhists, and especially Tibetan Buddhism believes in rebirth.

Pretty much in a nutshell, I am curious if Buddhists believe in a life after death such as the 6 wheels, and I know different sects of Buddhism have conflicting views, but I am just curious. Or is it that Buddhism is like reincarnation, but minus the soul part?

P.S, I am %100 sure that people like me asked this exact same question, and I read the FAQ questions, but I am just confused what Buddhists believe regarding this, because western buddhists say its more of a metaphor, while native or I guess south east asian buddhists believe to be literal. Also can it also mean that consciousness can leave the human body and join another body?

1 year, 4 months agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
July 10, 2018

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

> Mind stream: the mental continuum of the causally connected [by causes] flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

The Dalai Lama: "If one understands the term "soul" as a continuum of individuality from moment to moment, from lifetime to lifetime, then one can say that Buddhism also accepts a concept of soul; there is a kind of continuum of consciousness. From that point of view, the debate on whether or not there is a soul becomes strictly semantic. However, in the Buddhist doctrine of selflessness, or "no soul" theory, the understanding is that there is no eternal, unchanging, abiding, permanent self called "soul." That is what is being denied in Buddhism. Buddhism does not deny the continuum of consciousness." http://viewonbuddhism.org/dharma-quotes-quotations-buddhist/mind-mindstream.htm

Question on rebirth [R]

1 year, 4 months agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
July 9, 2018

Hello nice people. I've never really visited the sub yet here I am, bringing you a heavy question (in my opinion) 2 days in a row. I hope you'll offer the same wealth of information today as yesterday.

So my question today is this: I have read that the Buddha teaches us that the concept of the individual soul is false, and must be overcome just like any other false association our minds make with any aspect of our "selves" or existence.

Yet on the other hand, I obviously have also read that one of the main goals of this existence is to escape the cycle of birth & rebirth.

My question then is, if the ego is not real, the consciousness is not real, and the "soul" equally unreal, then what exactly is being born and reborn?

Appreciate any insight on this one bc it's really got me scratching my head. Thanks.

1 year, 4 months agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
July 9, 2018

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

> Mind stream: the mental continuum of the causally connected flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

u/krodha: "The mindstream as a continuum persists from lifetime to lifetime. It is impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."

<hr />

Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime. The Buddha explains that what we really are is a functionally unified combination of five aggregates. The five aggregates fall into two groups. First there is a material process, which is a current of material energy. Then there is a mental process, a current of mental happenings. Both these currents consist of factors that are subject to momentary arising and passing away. The mind is a series of mental acts made up of feelings, perceptions, mental formations and consciousness. These mental acts are called in Pali "cittas". Each citta arises, breaks up and passes away. When it breaks up it does not leave any traces behind. It does not have any core or inner essence that remains. But as soon as the citta breaks up, immediately afterwards there arises another citta. Thus we find the mind as a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness.

Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity.

... The physical organism --the body-- and the mental process --the stream of cittas-- occur in close interconnection. The body provides the physical basis for the stream of cittas and the mental process rests upon the body as its instrument or basis. When death comes, the body can no longer function as the physical support for consciousness. However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end. In the mind of the dying person there takes place a final thought - moment called the "death consciousness", which signals the complete end of the life. Then, following the death consciousness, there arises the first citta of the next life which springs up with the newly formed physical organism as its basis. The first citta of the new life continues the stream of consciousness which has passed out of the deceased body. The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it.

... Thus on account of craving the mind holds on to this presently existing organism so long as it lives. But when death occurs the present organism can no longer provide the basis for obtaining pleasure through the sense faculties. However, there is still the craving for the world of sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touches and ideas. So due to this craving for existence, consciousness lets go of this body and grasps hold of a new body, a fertilized egg. It lodges itself in that fertilized egg, bringing a whole storage of accumulated impressions over with it into the new psycho-physical organism." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

<hr />

Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "When the physical body loses its vitality it can no longer support the current of consciousness, the mental side of the process. But as long as there is a clinging to life, a desire to go on existing, the current of consciousness does not come to a stop with the body's loss of life. Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body, one which has just come into being through the meeting of sperm and egg. Thus, rebirth takes place immediately after death. The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

Non-self and Reincarnation [R]

1 year, 5 months agoKimUn posted submission on Buddhism.
June 28, 2018

Hello, I hope this message finds you all in good health and good spirits. I am having a little difficulty grasping the concept of non-self. Are we essentially the sum of the five aggregates? How does “consciousness” or the illusion of consciousness come about. In other words, what AM “I” ? Does this question make sense?

Do “I” have a place beyond the cycle of life, in nibbana? What do “I” undergo at death? The sum of those five aggregates would disappate as my senses die. Isn’t that where “I” end? How can “I” have past or future incarnations if I am just a sum of these aggregates?

Is there something more substantial, some life force beyond our reality and senses that takes me from life to life? Is that the thing that sticks with me through this endless cycle? Does anything?

1 year, 5 months agoKimUn posted comment on Buddhism.
June 29, 2018

Supposedly, the "mind stream" (citta santāna) or "continuum of consciousness" continues from one rebirth to the next. Here's the glossary definition in a book by the Dalai Lama:

> Mind stream: the mental continuum of the causally connected flow of momentary instances of consciousness. It is this "stream" of mental moments, each one producing the next, that continues through the process of death, intermediate state, and rebirth.

u/krodha: "The mindstream as a continuum persists from lifetime to lifetime. It is impermanent because it is an aggregated process comprised of discrete instances that act as cause and effect for one another, giving the appearance of an unbroken stream."

<hr />

Bhikkhu Bodhi: "The concept of rebirth without a transmigrating soul commonly raises the question: How can we speak of ourselves as having lived past lives if there is no soul, no single life going through these many lives? To answer this we have to understand the nature of individual identity in a single lifetime. The Buddha explains that what we really are is a functionally unified combination of five aggregates. The five aggregates fall into two groups. First there is a material process, which is a current of material energy. Then there is a mental process, a current of mental happenings. Both these currents consist of factors that are subject to momentary arising and passing away. The mind is a series of mental acts made up of feelings, perceptions, mental formations and consciousness. These mental acts are called in Pali "cittas". Each citta arises, breaks up and passes away. When it breaks up it does not leave any traces behind. It does not have any core or inner essence that remains. But as soon as the citta breaks up, immediately afterwards there arises another citta. Thus we find the mind as a succession of cittas, or series of momentary acts of consciousness.

Now when each citta falls away it transmits to its successor whatever impression has been recorded on itself, whatever experience it has undergone. Its perceptions, emotions and volitional force are passed on to the next citta, and thus all experiences we undergo leave their imprint on the onward flow of consciousness, on the "cittasantana", the continuum of mind. This transmission of influence, this causal continuity, gives us our continued identity. We remain the same person through the whole lifetime because of this continuity.

... The physical organism --the body-- and the mental process --the stream of cittas-- occur in close interconnection. The body provides the physical basis for the stream of cittas and the mental process rests upon the body as its instrument or basis. When death comes, the body can no longer function as the physical support for consciousness. However, when the body breaks up at death, the succession of cittas does not draw to an end. In the mind of the dying person there takes place a final thought - moment called the "death consciousness", which signals the complete end of the life. Then, following the death consciousness, there arises the first citta of the next life which springs up with the newly formed physical organism as its basis. The first citta of the new life continues the stream of consciousness which has passed out of the deceased body. The stream of consciousness is not a single entity, but a process, and the process continues. When the stream of cittas passes on to the next life it carries the storage of impressions along with it.

... Thus on account of craving the mind holds on to this presently existing organism so long as it lives. But when death occurs the present organism can no longer provide the basis for obtaining pleasure through the sense faculties. However, there is still the craving for the world of sights, sounds, smells, tastes, touches and ideas. So due to this craving for existence, consciousness lets go of this body and grasps hold of a new body, a fertilized egg. It lodges itself in that fertilized egg, bringing a whole storage of accumulated impressions over with it into the new psycho-physical organism." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/ebdha058.htm

<hr />

Ven. K. Sri Dhammananda: "When the physical body loses its vitality it can no longer support the current of consciousness, the mental side of the process. But as long as there is a clinging to life, a desire to go on existing, the current of consciousness does not come to a stop with the body's loss of life. Rather, when death takes place, when the body dies away, the mental current, driven by the thirst for more existence, will spring up again with the support of a new physical body, one which has just come into being through the meeting of sperm and egg. Thus, rebirth takes place immediately after death. The stream of memory may be interrupted and the sense of identity transferred to the new situation, but the entire accumulation of experience and disposition has been transmitted to the newborn being, and the cycle of becoming begins to revolve for still another term." https://www.budsas.org/ebud/whatbudbeliev/96.htm

The Deepest Form of Meditation? [R]

1 year, 10 months ago[deleted] posted submission on Buddhism.
Jan. 26, 2018

What is the deepest form of meditation and how can it be attained? Sometimes when I meditate there are mental barriers I have that do not allow me to go deeper so I'm stuck in the same spot.

1 year, 10 months ago[deleted] posted comment on Buddhism.
Jan. 27, 2018

Maybe try [Sleeping, Dreaming, and Dying: An Exploration of Consciousness] (https://www.amazon.com/Sleeping-Dreaming-Dying-Exploration-Consciousness/dp/0861711238) by the Dalai lama . If you're going to practice dzogchen it's really best to link up with an authentic guide first and get the intructions.

That being said, I don't think dzogchen books like [Dream Yoga and the Practice of Natural Light] (https://www.amazon.com/Dream-Yoga-Practice-Natural-Light/dp/1559391618) by Chogyal Namkhai Norbu have restrictions.

How is Christianity more true than Dzogchen? [R]

2 years agoNov. 11, 2017

[removed]

2 years agoparikalpita posted comment on DebateAChristian.
Nov. 19, 2017

btw you said...

>There’s a reason these things have to be argued for on Internet forums instead of academic circles.

You can find these things discussed in many academic circles from here to Russia. Maybe not in depth togyal light meditation (which isn't as important anyway) but you can find dzogchen/meditation and consciousness being studied by many scientists.

[Here's one example] (https://www.amazon.com/Sleeping-Dreaming-Dying-Exploration-Consciousness/dp/0861711238) where they're directly referecning dzogchen: Sleeping, Dreaming, and Dying: An Exploration of Consciousness Paperback – May 1, 2002 by His Holiness the Dalai Lama (Author),‎ Francisco J. Varela Ph.D. (Editor)

The entire Mind & Life Institute is dedicated to this topic.

Neuroscientists and the Dalai Lama Swap Insights on Meditation [R]

6 years, 4 months agoTrickish posted submission on Meditation.
July 30, 2013
6 years, 4 months agoTrickish posted on Meditation.
July 30, 2013

>Sleeping, Dreaming, and Dying is an absorbing account of the expanding dialogue between leading Western scientists and the foremost representative of Buddhism today, the Dalai Lama of Tibet. Revolving around three key moments of consciousness — sleep, dreams, and death — the conversations recorded here are both engrossing and highly readable. Narrated by Francisco Varela, an internationally recognized neuroscientist, the book begins with insightful remarks on the notion of personal identity by noted philosopher Charles Taylor, author of the acclaimed Sources of Self. This sets the stage for Dr. Jerome Engel, Dr. Joyce MacDougal and others to engage in extraordinary exchanges with the Dalai Lama on topics ranging from the neurology of sleep to the yoga of dreams. The conversations also reveal provocative divergences of opinion, as when the Dalai Lama expresses skepticism about "Near Death Experiences" as presented by Joan Halifax.

This is one of my favorites and i believe it is one in a series of such books: http://www.amazon.com/Sleeping-Dreaming-Dying-Exploration-Consciousness/dp/0861711238