Kidde 21008873 Monoxide Alarm

Last Updated On Tuesday March 31st, 2020
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Kidde

The Price has Dropped! But is it Cheap?

- The best price we've seen on Amazon in the past 12 months was on December 15, 2019. The current price is considered low and a good time to buy. It is 2% higher than the cost at its lowest.


Table of Contents

currently low price

19% Drop

Updated March 31, 2020

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Current price is higher than the price on Dec 15, 2019.
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Price Activity

DatePrice ActionChange %Price Level
25 Mar, 2020Price Drop-18.98%low
21 Mar, 2020Price Increase3.40%average
17 Mar, 2020Price Increase13.58%average
15 Mar, 2020Price Drop-11.95%low
12 Mar, 2020Price Drop-0.04%average
Update on 31 Mar, 2020

Amazon.com price change % swings above and below average price

Showing: Area under 0 show price is cheaper than average. Above 0 shows higher price than average.

Best Alternative Recommendations

We also found 10 products that redditors have recommended that are the best alternative to this product or are related accessories.

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Kidde 21008873 Monoxide Alarm

Product Details

  • Amazon.com Sold on
  • B004Y6V5CI Amazon ASIN
  • Kidde Brand
  • Categories

    Tools & Home Improvement, Carbon Monoxide Detectors, Fire Safety, Safety & Security

Reddit Reviews and Recommendations

  • 30 Reviews
  • July 18, 2019 Last Review Date
  • March 17, 2014 First Seen Review Date
  • 16 Reviewed on Subreddits

    HomeImprovement (5)
    LifeProTips (5)
    flying (4)
    vandwellers (3)
    preppers (2)
    DIY (1)
    GlitchInTheMatrix (1)
    HVAC (1)
    Homebrewing (1)
    MechanicAdvice (1)
    and 6 more...

Discussion and Reviews on Reddit

CO₂ in my Son's Bedroom at Night. [R]

8 months, 2 weeks agoCHCMATT posted submission on dataisbeautiful.
July 17, 2019
8 months, 2 weeks agoCHCMATT posted comment on dataisbeautiful.
July 18, 2019

PSA: Homeowners! If you have any natural gas systems in your home, such as a furnace or a water heater, buy at least one CO detector. More if you can. Put one near the furnace in the basement, and one in every bedroom being used. [R]

8 months, 3 weeks agodevilsadvocate posted submission on HomeImprovement.
July 12, 2019
8 months, 3 weeks agodevilsadvocate posted comment on HomeImprovement.
July 12, 2019
  1. The average human is like 5’8” to 5’10”. Eye level would be at/around 5ft. It’s an average. Many manufacturers say below that for rooms you sleep in but the actuality is CO, while being heavier than air also tends to mix relatively consistently with air.
  2. plenty of states have retarded rules, California thinks everything causes cancer. There is no hard and fast rule set on this but the consensus is use both as they detect different types of fires. You can do what you want. I spent way too much time reading super long documents that basically said what my towns fire marshal said Use both. The kitchen may be a bit more sensitive to photo sensors and may induce false positives but at that point you adjust the approach and buy a single ion unit for that location.

All of the research i did boiled basically down to this

  1. CO issues are really localized it’s not the same as your house on fire. A unit that gives you a reading and has a display for highest possible is probably all you need. CO in the garage isn’t going to kill you if you are in your bedroom. Though I agree on hard wired fire alarms as that’s a different scenario. I use combo ion/photo that are hardwired.

Here’s the co monitor I use. Have them in every bedroom and a few other places.

Kidde Battery Operated Carbon Monoxide Alarm with Digital Display KN-Copp-B-LPM https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_5.pkDbBDSZWA6

Here’s the smoke detectors I use. Have had them in place for a while with minimal false positives and the one I had was attributed to a loose wire but on a single unit.

Hardwire Smoke Detector with 9V Battery Backup and Ionization/Photoelectric Dual Sensors

https://www.homedepot.com/p/304854188

Agree with me or don’t. It’s your safety, not mine.

PSA: Homeowners! If you have any natural gas systems in your home, such as a furnace or a water heater, buy at least one CO detector. More if you can. Put one near the furnace in the basement, and one in every bedroom being used. [R]

8 months, 3 weeks agodevilsadvocate posted submission on HomeImprovement.
July 12, 2019
8 months, 3 weeks agodevilsadvocate posted comment on HomeImprovement.
July 12, 2019

Kidde Battery Operated Carbon Monoxide Alarm with Digital Display KN-Copp-B-LPM https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_5.pkDbBDSZWA6

What’s the most practical changes you’ve made to your home? [R]

8 months, 3 weeks agodevilsadvocate posted submission on HomeImprovement.
July 7, 2019

We’ve been in our home for 2 years now and I’ve finished all the big projects but still interested in making improvements. What are some cool/practical things you’ve done to your home that weren’t necessary but made life better?

For instance, I recently replaced our exhaust fan switches with timers in all bathrooms. Not necessary but definitely a practical improvement!

Edit: these are so great! Thank you to everyone for making my to-do list longer! I’m pumped! Keep the ideas coming!

8 months, 3 weeks agodevilsadvocate posted comment on HomeImprovement.
July 8, 2019

Its worth noting that while they make combination smoke/CO detectors, you may want to avoid them.

For one, a combination smoke detector that is both Ionization AND photoelectric is probably best in most areas and there are not any combo ION/Photo/CO detectors out there.

BUT more importantly the CO detectors are supposed to be positioned about 4-5 ft on the wall, not at the ceiling like smoke detectors are. Addtionally CO sensors calibrations are only good for a couple of years whereas smoke detectors are good for about 10 years.

So its best to stick CO detectors on the wall about 4-5 feet off the ground.

I currently have these in every bedroom in the house and in my office (which is also where our water heater is). Basically we sleep in gets a detector.

Any advice on buying foods like chickpeas and rice in bulk in the US? [R]

1 year agobutanerefill posted submission on preppers.
March 8, 2019

I'm new to prepping and just was wondering if I could get some advice on buying bulk food. Is it better to order online or buy from a local store in the city or does it not really matter? I plan to put it in some mylar bags and then in buckets like in the video I posted below. I generally just like to get second opinions on things so I'm not limited to one perspective so I welcome other sorts of advice too. I heard some people recommend smaller buckets so I will probably try to keep a variety. Thanks.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=apRe0uKkmy0

1 year agobutanerefill posted comment on preppers.
March 9, 2019

Homer buckets are not "food grade", so they use some chemicals in the form process which may still be present in the plastic, and could leach into whatever you store in the bucket. They make food grade buckets, they are usually white (but white doesn't automatically denote food grade, be careful there). In my area Lowes sells cheap food grade 5 gallon buckets, and they are very reasonably priced - less than $5 usually, which is a lot cheaper than some I've seen online. Some people will recommend getting them used from restaurants, but I like mine without any possibility of contamination or strong smells. Here's the one my Lowes carries:

https://www.lowes.com/pd/United-Solutions-5-Gallon-Residential-Food-Grade-General-Bucket/1000421377

I also get the spin-top Gamma lids, which you can find at Lowes or Home Depot. I order the mylar bags online, Amazon has them, as well as oxygen eaters.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001Y0Y8C6/

You probably also want some way to seal the bags shut - I got this:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B003HO30TE/

And oxygen eaters:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00H3RNCHQ/

As for the bulk foods, it's cheapest to buy local due to the weight, which causes shipping costs to negate any benefits to base price when buying online. Even if a local store has to order them, they usually won't charge you shipping, as long as it's being delivered to the store as part of their regular deliveries. Since you're not needing this stuff "right now", might as well take advantage of that.

Be careful of rice. Get white rice, it stores longer than brown. Also, rice can have arsenic, so I like to go Certified Organic for that - it might or might not affect the arsenic, but I just want to get it as "good" as possible, so your local Food Co-Op or similar "natural" grocer will probably be able to order for you in 20 or 25 lb bags (just right for a 5 gallon bucket).

I also store in buckets the following:

  • Pinto beans
  • Kidney beans
  • Garbanzo beans
  • Red lentils
  • Green lentils
  • Quick oats
  • White rice
  • Powdered milk
  • White sugar
  • Table salt

Also probably some other stuff I'm forgetting, it's been a few years since I put my stuff in storage. I also store some Mountain House, for use in the first hours or couple of days of an emergency. You want something that is easy to prepare in the initial period, because it'll probably be hectic (I prep for earthquake, personally). Also think about "comfort foods", things that you might not necessarily think of for prepping. Keeping your mood up (and those in your family) is important. So I also keep things for me (Oreos, Reeses Peanut Butter cups) in the deep freezer, and cases of Cup Noodle and Top Ramen for the wife, since she's into those. Places like Winco also have a bulk/emergency food section where they have 10# cans of freeze dried foods, so you might get some of those if you have a Winco nearby.

Also cases of canned food like canned vegetables can be had for reasonable prices from Costco. I keep things like canned corn, tomatoes, green beans, fruit. You'll be wanting some fruit and vegetables after a while, trust me, even if they are canned. I write the expiration date on the side of the case when storing in the closet so it's easy to see at a glance what is up for rotation. Then I give the expiring stuff to the local food bank.

Also consider how you will cook this stuff. I started with propane, but then moved to butane, which has a slightly nicer stove and you can get the small cans of butane for these stoves at your local Asian grocery store - the ones run by Koreans, generally. The butane is MUCH cheaper there than buying from even Wal-Mart, where they are priced for campers. I got a whole case of butane for $40. I think it's because many Asians use this stuff in their daily lives, so it's priced for that. Here's the stove I like:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00FGPXVSM/

It is sometimes "Sold by Amazon", not right now apparently, it comes and goes. You can probably find it on some other product pages on Amazon, but you can tell by the way it looks. The Coleman version of this stove is very nice, simple and adjustable, and it's usable indoors. Of course if you use a stove indoors then you need some way of protecting yourself against CO (carbon monoxide) - even though these stoves are generally very safe, you should have maybe 2 or 3 (spares in case one goes wrong) battery powered CO detectors. Like this:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004Y6V5CI/

I use Energizer Lithium AA batteries in mine, because they don't leak and they last for years in these detectors. They also sell a version of this detector now with a built-in, non-replaceable 10 year lithium battery, I believe, which is the lifetime of the device so you never have to worry about the battery, I guess. I am old school and like being able to have control over the batteries, personally, but YMMV.

Then you need water. Get yourself a couple of 55 gallon blue potable water barrels. I got one from Wal-Mart when they were on sale there. You can find sales if you wait around. Also they tend to go in and out of stock as they get shipments, so be patient. I think I got this one when it was on sale:

https://www.walmart.com/ip/Emergency-Essentials-55-Gallon-Water-Barrel/48735101

If you live in an earthquake zone, make sure you strap the water barrel to wall studs securely, just like your water heater. Otherwise it'll tip over and be useless in the real emergency. Those things are heavy when full!

Then you need some way to treat the water for long term storage. I like chlorine dioxide for this, it's better and safer (IMHO) than bleach, since it's actually made for treating potable water. AquaMira makes a convenient size that is made just for treating 55 gallon drums:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00B39KSUO/

If you want to get really ambitious, and be able to treat more water as needed (if you have a good local surface water source), then you might also look at ways to make chlorine for treating water on the fly. For example MSR makes the SE200 chlorine maker, which only requires water, table salt, and a 12V car battery:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0798WMJ9D/

Keep some non-iodized table salt in a bucket, and some way to charge your car battery (either a small Honda EU2200i generator, for short term emergencies, or solar for longer term) and you have a way to treat many thousands of gallons of water, enough for a whole village basically.

Of course you probably don't want to just take water from a stream or river and treat it - you also need to filter it first, to take out "the big bits" and also improve the taste. Gravity filters are what you want for that. I like the Katadyn TRK Drip Gravidyn. The Gravidyn filters are ceramic with activated carbon inside. The ceramic filters out the bad stuff (except viruses, which you'll be taking care of with the chlorine) and the activated carbon takes care of the taste.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B0007U011G/

I also like the Monolithic water filters, they are made for use in places like Africa (as is the Katadyn), but the Monolithic also claims to take out arsenic, which can be a problem in ground/surface water if you have volcanic rocks in the ground in your area.

https://www.monolithic.org/water-filters

One nice thing about both Katadyn and Monolithic is that once you see how they work, you realize that you could actually make your own from buckets. You would also need spigot, lock nuts for the filter candles, and a hole saw (drill bit for making holes). The Monolithic site has instructions on that, I think. I would buy the kit initially, then once you see how it works you can get what you need for DIY.

Sorry, I started small but then it kind of got away from me there... I should really write all this up as a proper article, will do at some point. It's a fun hobby and lots of stuff to occupy you for some time. You can really go down the rabbit hole on this one, trust me. For example, once you start thinking about filtering surface water from a creek or river, you quickly realize that the filters will get clogged up very quickly by all the crud that's in that water (algae etc). So then you start thinking about pre-filters, to save the "real" filter. What I eventually came up with was pool filter sand. You can buy big bags of it, e.g.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00VSNUO6S/

That size bag stores very nicely in a 5 gallon bucket. So you could drill holes in the bottom of the bucket, and keep the sand inside a paint strainer bag inside the bucket so it doesn't come out of the holes, e.g.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B06XBLFPFJ/

Or you could go the other route and use an EZ strainer:

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B007WIHEPC/

Or even a honey strainer for honey making will take out some stuff.

Oh and if you are going for a generator then you'll need to store gasoline... make sure it's non-ethanol, otherwise it'll gum up your carb. And use Sta-Bil, the regular red type, before storing (1 oz / 2.5 gallon). I got 12 of the 5 gallon Wavian NATO jerry cans. You want to make sure it's authentic Wavian, there are a lot of fakes out there made in China. Campingmaxx sells the real ones last time I looked, fwiw. I keep 12 cans in a large Rubbermaid deck box outside, they fit nicely in there. 12 works well because then you can label them with months of the year and rotate one per month into your car. Then your gas is never more than 12 months old, which is well within Sta-Bil timespan. Also I store the generators "wet", i.e. with gas and oil in so they are ready to go, in which case you need to run them for 1/2 hour every month just to keep the gas in the carb from getting too stale, otherwise it'll get hard to start. You can find non-ethanol gas in your area at https://www.pure-gas.org/

See what I mean? It's a rabbit hole. :P

My husband and I bought a 2016 GMC Terrain with ~30k miles on it 3 months ago. I was driving it the other night and within 5 seconds of smelling a strong exhaust smell I started to lose consciousness at the wheel. Dealership found no issues. What do I do!? [R]

1 year agoNickyBigDick posted submission on MechanicAdvice.
March 4, 2019

We bought a certified pre owned GMC Terrain with ~30k miles on it 3 months ago. Our neighbor is a salesman at a local large corporate dealership and he sold it to us. We have loved it up until last Wednesday night.

So I was driving home at night with my two kids (3yrs and 6 months) in the back seat. We were on a country road that is 55mph, and not around any other cars/houses etc. We live in Michigan, so I had the heat on and my seat warmers on.

All of a sudden there was a very strong exhaust smell from the front of the car. Within 3-5 seconds of smelling it I started to lose consciousness. Within a couple more seconds I gasped and had that feeling you get when you’re falling asleep and think you’re falling off the bed. I regained consciousness/control of the car and rolled down the windows. I called my husband and he came and met us. When he got in the car he smelled the lingering exhaust smell.

I took the kids home in his car, and my husband drove the Terrain around trying to recreate the smell without any lucky.

Our neighbor brought us home a loaner and took the Terrain into the dealership. They found nothing. He said they ran an emissions test and it didn’t throw any codes. No engine lights have ever been on.

What do I do? I can’t drive this car with my kids in it. What if I crashed the car into something when I passed out? What if my kids passed out too and no one found us for long enough for us to die!? What if this happened on the highway and I crashed us into another car!? Gah! Help!

1 year agoNickyBigDick posted comment on MechanicAdvice.
March 4, 2019

Take it to a different shop and have them test for an exhaust leak - not sure if that got lost in translation from the first shop, but an emissions test <> leak test.

You can diy with a shop vac and and a spray bottle. [See Here](https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=i1AFZQ_dQMA) if I had to guess, you are probably leaking at the exhaust manifold similar to the video. It's probably enough for the carbon monoxide to accumulate; when you crank the heater on to pull from outside air, it's probably sucking all of that right into the car.

In the meantime - $25 gets you a [carbon monoxide detector](https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-KN-COPP-B-LPM/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=sr_1_4?crid=1VTXT2RP1POD3&keywords=carbon+monoxide+detector+battery+operated&qid=1551717274&s=hi&sprefix=carbon+%2Ctools%2C205&sr=1-4) that you can stick in your car. I wouldn't rely on it as a solution, more as a stop gap until you get the problem fixed or trade the car in.

Also, a 2016 w 30k should not have an exhaust issue, as others have said I would be looking for a trade in.

Layout Finished - Accessory Time? (Minivan) [R]

1 year, 1 month agoSierrasclimber posted submission on vandwellers.
Feb. 26, 2019

I've been putting together a cheap minivan build and I'm not at the point where I've pretty much figured out all the major pieces (bed, layout, window covers, curtains) and have most of it finished. Now I'm looking for things I might have missed & recommendations for smaller accessory type stuff that I may need on the road. I'll mostly be dwelling in Southern US/hotter climates if that makes a difference.

A couple things I'd appreciate some recommendations on:

  • Battery Powered Fan(s) - I don't plan on having solar in this build.
  • CO Detector - Is this necessary if you're not cooking inside the van?
  • Lighting - I've seen a lot of people use strip LEDs, is that feasible without solar?

Anything else you guys can recommend that's proven useful on your travels would be awesome. Thanks!

1 year, 1 month agoSierrasclimber posted comment on vandwellers.
Feb. 28, 2019

If you want a CO Detector you can get a battery powered one. Main worry would be: you're asleep in a parking lot/festival area (Walmart/rest area), someone pulls up next to you, they fire up their generator (somehow that doesn't wake you up; ear plugs/alcohol), exhaust goes straight in your window, you die. All of this is way low change probability but it has happened and people have died.

https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-KN-COPP-B-LPM/dp/B004Y6V5CI

Fan

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B01GZMMH7K

Lights - lots of USB lights out there. You can power them and the fan off a powerbank if you want or go to something a little bigger like a GoalZero yeti. If you're getting a DC fridge I'd install an auxiliary/house/leisure battery setup otherwise there are probably less complicated solutions. I've wanted to do a house battery but it has been too involved so far to get done.

Landlord decided to turn down the heat today in my MN apartment as it reached -40°. But the idiot must have forgotten he pays my electric and doesn't realize that I value my comfort over safety or energy conservation. [R]

1 year, 2 months agosuper-purple-lizard posted submission on funny.
Jan. 30, 2019
1 year, 1 month agosuper-purple-lizard posted comment on funny.
Jan. 31, 2019

If you really want to do this then get a carbon monoxide detector (one that will show PPM and not just an alarm) like this for $25 https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-KN-COPP-B-LPM-x/dp/B004Y6V5CI/

Anything above 10ppm you don't want extended exposure to.

Be safe.

With temps around -20* the next couple days, what are some things as homeowners we need to do? [R]

1 year, 2 months agodevilsadvocate posted submission on HomeImprovement.
Jan. 29, 2019

We bought our first house this past summer and this is our first winter. Temps here in Chicago are looking at around -20 degrees these next few days. What do we need to do to protect the house? So far, I know to keep the heat blasting and I am letting a light trickle of water run on all sinks/tubs. Anything else we should be doing? Thanks!

Update: Thanks everyone for all the responses! Any more, just please keep them coming! I noticed some air getting in through the corner of a few of my windows. I stuffed it with a paper towel and then taped seran wrap all over it.

1 year, 2 months agodevilsadvocate posted comment on HomeImprovement.
Jan. 30, 2019

Yep. The recommendation is to have the sensor 4-5 feet off the ground.

I have one of these in every room people May sleep in or is near s motor (bedrooms and my office which has my hot water heater and a couple freezers in it. )

Kidde 21008873 Battery Operated Digital Display KN-Copp-B-LPM Carbon Monoxide Alarm https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_.tBuCbJ8RFK2R

They are cheap, so replacing them every 2 years when the calibration runs out is not an issue for me. .

Installed CO detector about a month ago, and it’s slowly turned dark. Is this CO or are these things questionable. [R]

1 year, 6 months agoyouthlargepapi posted submission on flying.
Sept. 9, 2018
1 year, 6 months agoyouthlargepapi posted comment on flying.
Sept. 10, 2018

I just got one of these battery guys for my kid's room, I wonder if there's any reason it wouldn't work in an aircraft? It's reasonably compact and like twenty bucks

https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-KN-COPP-B-LPM/dp/B004Y6V5CI/

My 4yr (ongoing?) battle with birds! [R]

1 year, 8 months agoRunInCirclesQuickly posted submission on DIY.
July 19, 2018
1 year, 8 months agoRunInCirclesQuickly posted comment on DIY.
July 19, 2018

This right here. Cheap and easy to install, everyone should have one if they have any gas/wood appliances. I've got this dude near my bedrooms.

Let's talk about propane, I tell you what. [R]

2 years, 8 months agoJuly 25, 2017

[deleted]

2 years, 8 months agocrazyguyonabike posted on preppers.
July 25, 2017

I got about 60 of the 1 lb canisters and 2 of the 20 lb tanks in one of these deck boxes:

http://www.homedepot.com/p/Rubbermaid-73-gal-Medium-Deck-Box-with-Seat-FG5F2100OLVSS/202523344

The two 20 lbs go in a corner each, and then the 1 lbs are arranged around them on the floor. Then I cut a piece of plywood in the shape of the inside of the deck box, with cutouts for the two 20 lb tanks, to make a second story which is laid on top of the first layer of 1 lb canisters. Then I get a second layer of the 1 lbs in there, and it's about 60 of those plus 2 x 20 lbs, makes approx 100 lbs total, give or take. It's been a couple of years now, and they seem to last very well in there. I also keep some adaptors and hoses so I can hook the 20 lbs up to the Little Buddy heaters and the propane stove etc. I keep the deck box on the lower deck behind the house in a spot under the upper deck so that it doesn't get a lot of direct sunlight. I think it's probably better if it doesn't get too hot. Also, if anything leaks, then propane is heavier than air, so you want the path to be away from the house, not down into your crawlspace or basement. Finally I recently got a "WARNING PROPANE" sticker (from Amazon) for the firemen should there ever be a fire around my house. They should know about that amount of propane, for obvious reasons.

One last thing: Consider getting a couple of battery powered carbon monoxide detectors, just for peace of mind, e.g.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004Y6V5CI/

Carbon monoxide illness linked to Ford SUVs hits Austin police hardest [R]

2 years, 8 months ago-weinerbutt- posted submission on ProtectAndServe.
July 18, 2017
2 years, 8 months ago-weinerbutt- posted on ProtectAndServe.
July 19, 2017

https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Battery-Operated-Carbon-Monoxide-Digital/dp/B004Y6V5CI

That is the one I have in my car and my house.

I got one after a father and son in my city died while waiting for their car to warm up. They didn't know they had a leak in their exhaust and the CO doesn't smell like exhaust. It has no smell.

Mooney pilot passes out from Carbon Monoxide poisoning...and lives! [R]

3 years, 1 month agoybitz posted submission on flying.
Feb. 28, 2017

Hey - so this happened back in February. A Mooney pilot passed out from carbon monoxide poisoning, but woke up alive in a field! Crazy! I saw the story on: https://mooneyspace.com/topic/21247-mooney-crash-pilot-walks-away/?page=5#comment-328215 -- check it out if you're curious. The pilot made some comments.

Following the story, he got in touch with a company that produces industrial grade detectors and got a 20% pilot discount for us! I wanted to pass along the story as I also had a friend who had an issue with carbon monoxide in the cockpit that almost turned fatal (he noticed he was falling asleep on an instrument approach but caught it and opened the windows...said he had a headache for almost a month afterward). I ended up buying the unit for myself - see https://mooneyspace.com/topic/21484-sensorcon-co-group-buy/ for the details for the discount.

The paper ones are ineffective (you can't really see that color change especially if you're experiencing the symptoms) and the one from Sensorcon vibrates, has an aural and visual alarm and displays a PPM readout. I have no affiliation with the company, but thought I'd pass along the story in case other folks wanted to pick up a good CO detector for less than a hundred bucks including the discount (I got the industrial) to prevent things like this happening.

Fly safe!

3 years, 1 month agoybitz posted on flying.
Feb. 28, 2017

Yes. Not as good as $100 industrial ones, but better than paper ones. May not alert you as quickly for low level CO exposure, but I'm more concerned about high concentration that would make me pass out. I use this $20 CO alarm from Amazon.

> it is designed to sound at 85 decibels at 10 feet when it detects 70 ppm (parts per million) of CO for 60 to 240 minutes, 150 ppm for 10 to 50 minutes, or 400 ppm for 4 to 15 minutes. The easily visible digital display indicates the level of CO that the unit is sensing, and it updates the status every 15 seconds for timely and accurate readings

It's bulkier than the $100 ones made for industrial use, and in my flight bag the self-test button sometimes get depressed and it lets out a ear piercing beep (on the up side, the alarm is definitely loud enough to be heard in a piston plane).

Will this cheap Carbon Monoxide detector kill me? [R]

3 years, 1 month agoMarvinMcNut posted submission on HomeImprovement.
Feb. 2, 2017

I bought a $25 Kidde CO detector from Home depot to hang a few feet above the stove in my camper van.

I installed it just before discovering the slew of much pricier detectors, running from $50 to $150. Some are hardier, some come with thermometers, some come with wifi, you get the idea.

With a higher price, am I paying for anything more than bells and whistles? I want a reading of any CO at all, not just an alarm at fatal doses. Can I pay for a more accurate sensor, or do they all use the same technology?

3 years, 1 month agoMarvinMcNut posted on HomeImprovement.
Feb. 2, 2017

I have a Kidde as well. It is very highly ranked on Amazon with thousands of positive reviews. this one

Searing [R]

3 years, 2 months agoJan. 16, 2017

[deleted]

3 years, 2 months agobdporter posted on sousvide.
Jan. 16, 2017

> The elevated temperatures of the cast iron is supposed to also allow a more complete combustion of the propane, which further reduces the CO concern.

Unburnt hydrocarbons (which could make the food taste bad) may be a bigger concern than CO. However, it doesn't hurt to be safe, so you can always get a CO detector if it adds to your piece of mind.

Anyone have any suggestions on a CO detector? [R]

3 years, 3 months agoybitz posted submission on flying.
Dec. 17, 2016

Im looking for a good carbon monoxide detector for these winter months while flying with the heat on. I really want an electric one with a long lasting battery. Something that makes a good amount of noise. Just wondering what you all use? Thanks p.s. under $100 would be nice

3 years, 3 months agoybitz posted on flying.
Dec. 17, 2016

I use a battery powered household one. Probably not as good as an aviation specific one, but it's $20 and better than nothing.

https://www.amazon.com/Kidde-Battery-Operated-Carbon-Monoxide-Digital/dp/B004Y6V5CI/

Firefighter Eating At Restaurant Notices Carbon Monoxide Symptoms, Saves 32 People [R]

3 years, 3 months agobobdolebobdole posted submission on UpliftingNews.
Dec. 13, 2016
3 years, 3 months agobobdolebobdole posted on UpliftingNews.
Dec. 14, 2016

A Carbon Monoxide Story [R]

3 years, 10 months agoybitz posted submission on flying.
May 10, 2016

Hey ya'll,

Just a reminder to be wary of carbon monoxide. As the new flying season enters, brush up on the symptoms (headache, fatigue, drowsiness, etc.).

Recently got my fearless plane up and running again. I'd be flying 3-4 hours practicing proficiency, which usually did little to stop my energy, but was getting headaches and really fatigued after my flights now. Those little cards that you can buy that change color arent necessarily the best CO detectors. I was barely able to notice the color changing on mine, and yes it was new. I purchased an electric UL CO detector and went flying today. During the run up it immediately indicated 11ppm. On downwind it registered 44ppm WITH the air vents open and the cabin heat closed. EPA says 35 is too much after 1 hour, 9ppm after multiple hours. OSHA says 35-50ppm and the FAA says 50ppm. I ended the flight immediately and will be disconnecting the cabin heat system tomorrow amd hope that fixes the problem.

Anyways, here is a great article about CO and different detectors.

And here is an FAA seminar about CO in the cockpit.

Hope this reminds you to be safe. Have fun.

3 years, 10 months agoybitz posted on flying.
May 10, 2016

This one's $20. It's not aviation specific, and a bit bulky, but is battery operated and should work just as well? http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-KN-COPP-B-LPM-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-Digital/dp/B004Y6V5CI

Messages that aren't me [R]

4 years, 1 month agoInvalidNinja posted submission on GlitchInTheMatrix.
Feb. 22, 2016

So I'm in the shower and I hear my phone blowing up a lot and I see that I've been apparently sending messages to a girl I had a thing with a long time ago continuing where we left off and it's really strange and I have a girlfriend now so seeing these messages is scaring the actual fuck out of me, it even ended with "also I'm not my name just thought you should know and I'm wondering how this even happened and if someone's in my iMessage doing this

4 years, 1 month agoInvalidNinja posted on GlitchInTheMatrix.
Feb. 23, 2016

Be careful that you don't have a Carbon Monoxide leak. Seriously, it can cause weird shit. There was a post on reddit a while back where a guy was leaving n ones around his house that he didn't remember and they weren't in his handwriting. He thought his landlord was coming into his house and fucking with him, but it turns out there was a CO leak.

Get a CO meter and check.

Kidde KN-COPP-B-LPM Battery-Operated Carbon Monoxide Alarm with Digital Display https://www.amazon.com/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=cmswrotherawd_jslZwb9PRQ7B4

Most Important Thing is to Keep Warm [R]

4 years, 12 months agobreawycker posted submission on facepalm.
April 1, 2015
4 years, 12 months agobreawycker posted on facepalm.
April 2, 2015

Carbon Monoxide or CO is is a colorless, odorless, and tasteless gas that is slightly less dense than air. It is toxic to humans when encountered in concentrations above about 35 ppm (parts per million/One of a million equal parts of a whole.). Carbon Monoxide poisoning occurs because carbon monoxide combines with hemoglobin to produce carboxyhemoglobin, which usurps the space in hemoglobin that normally carries oxygen, but is ineffective for delivering oxygen to bodily tissues. The common symptoms are headaches and dizziness. Please make sure you install a carbon monoxide detector somewhere in your house. It could save your life.

New van! Pictures and questions... [R]

5 years agokarmaisdharma posted submission on vandwellers.
March 22, 2015

Hey friends,

I bought a van a week ago today! It's a 1993 Dodge Ram with only 79,000 miles on it. I had a break in my schedule this week, so I jumped into working on it. It's been an exercise in Murphy's Law thus far, but things are starting to come together. Here are some pictures: http://imgur.com/a/eQe38

Questions:

1) I love books. I'm going to have to get rid of most of mine, but there are some I refuse to part with. Does anyone keep books with them on the road? If so, what's your setup like? I'm thinking of mounting a gutted 80's Samsung speaker and using that as a bookshelf. Other ideas are welcome!

2) I live in Colorado (as you probably gathered by the license plates... which, by the way, are expired and will be replaced this week when I register it) and I plan to spend much of my time here. CO's got a very dry climate. I've heard talk of condensation being an issue while sleeping, and potential rust issues as a result. Is this something I need to worry about, and if so, how do I combat it?

3) This is the big one. I don't know where to put the spare tire. I don't want it inside for obvious reasons. I would love to put it under the van, but there's a tank of some sort at the far rear of the vehicle. I don't see any area where I could mount it underneath. I have room on the roof, but that seems like a nightmare to get to if I was alone and needed it. Does anyone have experience installing a rear door spare tire mount? If so, what did you use, and how difficult was the installation?

4) I'm planning on investing in a propane heater. How do you run one of these without risking dangerous levels of fumes? Venting seems counterproductive because to vent you have to let cold air in. Thoughts?

Edit: Not sure why this is worthy of downvotes... If I'm asking stupid questions, please kindly let me know where I can look to find the answers.

5 years agokarmaisdharma posted on vandwellers.
March 23, 2015

Just installed mine a few weeks ago. I haven't ran my heater with it yet though to see how much venting will be appropriate as I live in Phx and it's already heating up haha. But yea I have a mr heater buddy and hear they are great. I always keep a few books on hand. Couple traveling books (kerouac/hemingway/etc), something spiritual for when I'm in the woods (tao te ching) haha, something about astronomy, music theory, shit I can learn from.

PSA: When brewing in your garage in the winter, Ventilate! [R]

5 years, 2 months agobrewerdoc posted submission on Homebrewing.
Jan. 29, 2015

Long time ago, when I was still an idiot for many reasons, I brewed on a very cold, very wet day in the garage. So cold i was having trouble getting anything to warm up including myself. So I closed the garage door.

Fast forward a few hours, and i have a massive headache and am super nauseous. Why, propane fumes.

I am sure 99% of you know this, but might as well throw it out there with all the great "brewing over the winter" posts i have been seeing lately.

5 years, 2 months agobrewerdoc posted on Homebrewing.
Jan. 29, 2015

Carbon monoxide can be produced by any fire. If you are heating anything by "gas" in your house be it propane, butane or whatever, you should have a carbon monoxide monitor. You can find them for about $20-30 dollars. amazon link to a CO detector.

Symptoms of carbon monoxide poisoning include: -Dull headache -Weakness -Dizziness -Nausea -Vomiting -Shortness of breath -Confusion -Blurred vision -Loss of consciousness

I admit a couple of people to the hospital a year who get carbon monoxide poisoning. It's never pretty and the treatment is limited. Hyperbaric oxygen is one of the treatments but many hospitals do not have this option so they resort to putting a mask on the person who inhaled the poison till they can call other hospitals till they find one that has the hyperbaric oxygen treatment.

Even if you have a "gas" furnace, water heater, stove or brewery in your house you should have one of these. The molecule has no smell and by the time you notice the effects its usually either too late and its very advanced.

Anyone have tips on keeping the back of a truck camper warm at night? [R]

5 years, 2 months agoDazarGaidin posted submission on vandwellers.
Jan. 24, 2015

What's up guys. Just started the whole mobile lifestyle in my truck with a camper top. Love it so far! :D just wondering if anyone has tips on keeping it warm in the camper. I have plenty of blankets and wear a jacket and sweats to bed and im in orange county so it is on the warmer side. But eventually im doing a surf trip up the california coast and it will for sure get a lot colder. Anyone have any tips or tricks?? Thanks! Hare Krishna! Praise Oden!

5 years, 2 months agoDazarGaidin posted on vandwellers.
Jan. 24, 2015

its like a smoke detector, just stick it in there around head level :) Mine sits on counter near my bed.

LPT: Stuck in snow? Keep your exhaust clear! [R]

5 years, 4 months agoMisterQuimper posted submission on LifeProTips.
Nov. 19, 2014

I learned this a long time ago, but not a lot of people think of it. They assume that your exhaust will keep the snow melted. To a point it's true, but when you're stuck in deep and/or heavy snow, with a lot coming down (like in Buffalo right now), your exhaust can't melt enough of it. Then the gasses will start coming in to your car. Many people have died this way, and I believe at least one already has in this storm alone.

So please, if you get stuck in the snow and you're leaving your engine on for warmth (bonus-LPT: always keep your car filled with gas in the winter, especially before a storm), please get out every so often and make sure there's room around your exhaust for it to vent.

edit: To those saying this is useless, car will stall out first, etc.: Yes, it comes out of the tail pipe. But when there's snow around the tail pipe (up, over, around, etc., not packed into, like this), it has to go somewhere. That somewhere is the only clear area it can find, under the car. I don't know of any airtight cars in existence, so it works its way into the cabin.

edit 2: No, it's not for random little bits of snow, it's for extreme cases where snow is piling up around your car. And I never said it completely blocks the tail pipe, just that it blocks it from dissipating away, and ends up going under the car.

edit 3: As /u/Susan_Werner pointed out below, here's an article for all of those saying it's not possible: http://www.medicinenet.com/script/main/art.asp?articlekey=563

edit 4: 8 years, and I finally got a front page post, haha. If I save even one life, it's most definitely worth it.Speaking of, for all of those that are calling BS, here's the first of countless articles that can be found from a quick Google search: 2 car deaths in Boston tied to carbon monoxide *

5 years, 4 months agoMisterQuimper posted on LifeProTips.
Nov. 19, 2014

Gonna risk the /hailcorporate tag but now is a good a time as any to stock up on CO detectors. MA code mandates at least one for every floor in your house (seems a bit overkill since CO doesn't rise) but one near your furnace is a bare minimum

Kidde KN-COPP-B-LPM

LPT: Make sure you have your carbon monoxide detectors in working order. I almost just lost my family today. [R]

5 years, 8 months agojidar posted submission on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

My alarm went off at 5AM this morning, and I had a hard time getting out of bed. I was extremely tired and had a lot of trouble keeping my balance. I could hardly stand up and at one point I realized I was standing over the toilet with my toothbrush in the water and the toilet flushing. I think I passed out and caught myself.

It completely messed with my thought processes and I didn't make rational decisions. I thought I was having a heart attack yet still opted to drive to work and not tell my wife about it. I remember looking at my lunch on the way out but not thinking to grab it, then I went out and tried to put my keys in my wife's car, then realized I forgot my lunch, and on the way back from her car, I realized it was her car. All of this seemed normal under the effects of carbon dioxide monoxide poisoning.

I made it to work somehow (35 mile drive) and 1.5-2 hours after work started at 6, I get a call from my wife saying she got up and could hardly stand, and that she fell over in my son's room. Luckily she knew to get out of the house before calling me, then had her mom pick her up.

I called my mom (who is my landlord) and she had the fire department out there by 9, and they walked in 2 feet and said the reading was 250ppm which is fatal. Had they woken up 2 hours later they would both be dead and I would probably kill myself.

We all went to urgent care and got cleared, but both me and my wife have nasty dull headaches. My 2 year old son is fine, they weren't worried about him at all. Him sleeping with his door shut may be what saved him there.

All of this could have been avoided had I had detectors. When we moved it we got new smoke detectors, then decided to get the carbon monoxide detectors a little down the road and now 2 years later realized we both completely forgot.

Don't fall victim to something so easily avoidable, get your detector if you don't have one, and if you do, check it every once in a while.

FYI the gas company came out and determined that it was the boiler slowly leaking over time that did it. They shut it down and opened the windows and the levels are 0. I got 2 new detectors for my home too.

EDIT: I didn't expect this to blow up, but I'm very thankful for the kind words, and especially glad that many of you have learned from my mistake and bought one for yourself.

My wife got a call back from Urgent care who called poison control, and they sent her and my son to the ER for better blood testing + oxygen. Both have been sent home with normal levels in their system. I was there too but the doctors felt I didn't need it because I had less exposure and seem normal (and feel about 90%).

5 years, 8 months agojidar posted on LifeProTips.
July 22, 2014

Why wait? You might forget. Here is the top rated one on Amazon and at $20 it's a fair price. http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-KN-COPP-B-LPM-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-Digital/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1406035532&sr=8-1&keywords=carbon+monoxide

LPT: Make sure you have your carbon monoxide detectors in working order. I almost just lost my family today. [R]

5 years, 8 months agoHitTheTwit posted submission on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

My alarm went off at 5AM this morning, and I had a hard time getting out of bed. I was extremely tired and had a lot of trouble keeping my balance. I could hardly stand up and at one point I realized I was standing over the toilet with my toothbrush in the water and the toilet flushing. I think I passed out and caught myself.

It completely messed with my thought processes and I didn't make rational decisions. I thought I was having a heart attack yet still opted to drive to work and not tell my wife about it. I remember looking at my lunch on the way out but not thinking to grab it, then I went out and tried to put my keys in my wife's car, then realized I forgot my lunch, and on the way back from her car, I realized it was her car. All of this seemed normal under the effects of carbon dioxide monoxide poisoning.

I made it to work somehow (35 mile drive) and 1.5-2 hours after work started at 6, I get a call from my wife saying she got up and could hardly stand, and that she fell over in my son's room. Luckily she knew to get out of the house before calling me, then had her mom pick her up.

I called my mom (who is my landlord) and she had the fire department out there by 9, and they walked in 2 feet and said the reading was 250ppm which is fatal. Had they woken up 2 hours later they would both be dead and I would probably kill myself.

We all went to urgent care and got cleared, but both me and my wife have nasty dull headaches. My 2 year old son is fine, they weren't worried about him at all. Him sleeping with his door shut may be what saved him there.

All of this could have been avoided had I had detectors. When we moved it we got new smoke detectors, then decided to get the carbon monoxide detectors a little down the road and now 2 years later realized we both completely forgot.

Don't fall victim to something so easily avoidable, get your detector if you don't have one, and if you do, check it every once in a while.

FYI the gas company came out and determined that it was the boiler slowly leaking over time that did it. They shut it down and opened the windows and the levels are 0. I got 2 new detectors for my home too.

EDIT: I didn't expect this to blow up, but I'm very thankful for the kind words, and especially glad that many of you have learned from my mistake and bought one for yourself.

My wife got a call back from Urgent care who called poison control, and they sent her and my son to the ER for better blood testing + oxygen. Both have been sent home with normal levels in their system. I was there too but the doctors felt I didn't need it because I had less exposure and seem normal (and feel about 90%).

5 years, 8 months agoHitTheTwit posted on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

I have three of these, one on each level of my house. http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-KN-COPP-B-LPM-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-Digital/dp/B004Y6V5CI/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1405998065&sr=8-1&keywords=carbon+monoxide+detector No affiliate link included. $60 bucks total, and I don't even feel terrified reading this thread.

LPT: Make sure you have your carbon monoxide detectors in working order. I almost just lost my family today. [R]

5 years, 8 months ago[deleted] posted submission on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

My alarm went off at 5AM this morning, and I had a hard time getting out of bed. I was extremely tired and had a lot of trouble keeping my balance. I could hardly stand up and at one point I realized I was standing over the toilet with my toothbrush in the water and the toilet flushing. I think I passed out and caught myself.

It completely messed with my thought processes and I didn't make rational decisions. I thought I was having a heart attack yet still opted to drive to work and not tell my wife about it. I remember looking at my lunch on the way out but not thinking to grab it, then I went out and tried to put my keys in my wife's car, then realized I forgot my lunch, and on the way back from her car, I realized it was her car. All of this seemed normal under the effects of carbon dioxide monoxide poisoning.

I made it to work somehow (35 mile drive) and 1.5-2 hours after work started at 6, I get a call from my wife saying she got up and could hardly stand, and that she fell over in my son's room. Luckily she knew to get out of the house before calling me, then had her mom pick her up.

I called my mom (who is my landlord) and she had the fire department out there by 9, and they walked in 2 feet and said the reading was 250ppm which is fatal. Had they woken up 2 hours later they would both be dead and I would probably kill myself.

We all went to urgent care and got cleared, but both me and my wife have nasty dull headaches. My 2 year old son is fine, they weren't worried about him at all. Him sleeping with his door shut may be what saved him there.

All of this could have been avoided had I had detectors. When we moved it we got new smoke detectors, then decided to get the carbon monoxide detectors a little down the road and now 2 years later realized we both completely forgot.

Don't fall victim to something so easily avoidable, get your detector if you don't have one, and if you do, check it every once in a while.

FYI the gas company came out and determined that it was the boiler slowly leaking over time that did it. They shut it down and opened the windows and the levels are 0. I got 2 new detectors for my home too.

EDIT: I didn't expect this to blow up, but I'm very thankful for the kind words, and especially glad that many of you have learned from my mistake and bought one for yourself.

My wife got a call back from Urgent care who called poison control, and they sent her and my son to the ER for better blood testing + oxygen. Both have been sent home with normal levels in their system. I was there too but the doctors felt I didn't need it because I had less exposure and seem normal (and feel about 90%).

5 years, 8 months ago[deleted] posted on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

Thank you for sharing this. I am buying Co2 detectors now

edit: bought two http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B004Y6V5CI/ref=ohdetailso00s00i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

LPT: Make sure you have your carbon monoxide detectors in working order. I almost just lost my family today. [R]

5 years, 8 months agoJondayz posted submission on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

My alarm went off at 5AM this morning, and I had a hard time getting out of bed. I was extremely tired and had a lot of trouble keeping my balance. I could hardly stand up and at one point I realized I was standing over the toilet with my toothbrush in the water and the toilet flushing. I think I passed out and caught myself.

It completely messed with my thought processes and I didn't make rational decisions. I thought I was having a heart attack yet still opted to drive to work and not tell my wife about it. I remember looking at my lunch on the way out but not thinking to grab it, then I went out and tried to put my keys in my wife's car, then realized I forgot my lunch, and on the way back from her car, I realized it was her car. All of this seemed normal under the effects of carbon dioxide monoxide poisoning.

I made it to work somehow (35 mile drive) and 1.5-2 hours after work started at 6, I get a call from my wife saying she got up and could hardly stand, and that she fell over in my son's room. Luckily she knew to get out of the house before calling me, then had her mom pick her up.

I called my mom (who is my landlord) and she had the fire department out there by 9, and they walked in 2 feet and said the reading was 250ppm which is fatal. Had they woken up 2 hours later they would both be dead and I would probably kill myself.

We all went to urgent care and got cleared, but both me and my wife have nasty dull headaches. My 2 year old son is fine, they weren't worried about him at all. Him sleeping with his door shut may be what saved him there.

All of this could have been avoided had I had detectors. When we moved it we got new smoke detectors, then decided to get the carbon monoxide detectors a little down the road and now 2 years later realized we both completely forgot.

Don't fall victim to something so easily avoidable, get your detector if you don't have one, and if you do, check it every once in a while.

FYI the gas company came out and determined that it was the boiler slowly leaking over time that did it. They shut it down and opened the windows and the levels are 0. I got 2 new detectors for my home too.

EDIT: I didn't expect this to blow up, but I'm very thankful for the kind words, and especially glad that many of you have learned from my mistake and bought one for yourself.

My wife got a call back from Urgent care who called poison control, and they sent her and my son to the ER for better blood testing + oxygen. Both have been sent home with normal levels in their system. I was there too but the doctors felt I didn't need it because I had less exposure and seem normal (and feel about 90%).

5 years, 8 months agoJondayz posted on LifeProTips.
July 21, 2014

This one is on sale on Amazon right now for 63% off, $20. It has a digital read out and good reviews. I just bought one. I know you have Prime, order it you lazy ass.

I know it's not our responsibility, but please inform customers on carbon monoxide poisoning when doing a furnace install. These are useless deaths just from plain ignorance. [R]

6 years agoMarch 17, 2014

[deleted]

6 years agoglueland posted on HVAC.
March 17, 2014

They already have detectors that show a reading on an lcd display, they only sound off at 70, but they show levels that are lower.

http://www.amazon.com/Kidde-KN-COPP-B-LPM-Battery-Operated-Monoxide-Digital/dp/B004Y6V5CI/