Household Essentials 5009-1 Collapsible Portable Indoor Tripod Clothes Drying Rack for Hanging Laundry | Silver and Blue

Household Essentials

The Price has Dropped! But is it Cheap?

- The best price we've seen on Amazon in the past 12 months was on March 8, 2019. The current price is considered low and a good time to buy. It is 4% higher than the cost at its lowest.


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currently low price

26% Drop

Updated August 21, 2019

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Price Activity

DatePrice ActionChange %Price Level
9 Aug, 2019Price Drop-26.26%low
28 Jul, 2019Price Increase35.61%high
26 Jul, 2019Price Drop-26.26%low
24 Jul, 2019Price Increase36.38%high
19 Jul, 2019Price Increase3.40%low
Update on 21 Aug, 2019

Amazon.com price change % swings above and below average price

Showing: Area under 0 show price is cheaper than average. Above 0 shows higher price than average.

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We also found 1 products that redditors have recommended that are the best alternative to this product or are related accessories.

Recommended in femalefashionadvice

 
Household Essentials 5009-1 Collapsible Portable Indoor Tripod Clothes Drying Rack for Hanging Laundry | Silver and Blue

Product Details

  • Amazon.com Sold on
  • B002E3KYTS Amazon ASIN
  • Household Essentials Brand
  • 5009-1 Model Number
  • Household Essentials Manufacturer
  • Categories

    Storage & Organization, Home & Kitchen, Laundry Storage & Organization, Drying Racks

Reddit Reviews and Recommendations

  • 16 Reviews
  • Dec. 28, 2016 Last Review Date
  • July 25, 2013 First Seen Review Date
  • 6 Reviewed on Subreddits

    bjj (6)
    femalefashionadvice (5)
    malefashionadvice (2)
    DestinyTheGame (1)
    Frugal (1)
    TinyHouses (1)

Discussion and Reviews on Reddit

Portable washing machine and air drying - stiffness solutions? [R]

2 years, 7 months agoSkullriot posted submission on TinyHouses.
Dec. 28, 2016

First I want to thank this subreddit for the initial idea, I never thought I could have a washing machine in my 1BR apartment with no hookups till I found this. Thanks!

I recently got a portable washing machine for my 1BR apartment and it has been great not spending the money to go to the laundromat. The added bonus is that my water bill is incorporated into my rent and fixed, so I don't pay for the extra water consumption, and the cost to run the washer appears to be lower than the cost of what I spent at the laundromat. Yay!

One big issue I am running into is the air dried stiffness. It's not too big a deal, but I am wondering if anyone else is hang drying their clothes as well and has found a good fix for this. The one fix I found, vinegar, might not work too well because a portable washing machine doesn't have a rinse cycle like a standard wash, you put the wet clothes into the spin compartment and just run water over them, then spin it out. It works great, but getting vinegar to actually get all the laundry.

Are there maybe any detergent alternatives that don't leave so much behind? I read that it's actually a "salt" that it leaves behind, hence the vinegar fix.

2 years, 7 months agoSkullriot posted on TinyHouses.
Dec. 28, 2016

Sure, here is my whole setup for my apartment:
Washing Machine
Pants drying stand
Everything else drying stand
Sock hanger
drip dry hangers
Pants hangers - although I got my hangers at WalMart and they have rubber on the clips

In retrospect I would actualy recommend getting this or the tri-arm rack and this as the big drying rack thing is a bit overkill when you have the sock hanger. You could get two sock hangers and hang them on the side of the shirt rack and dry everything you need in less space without having to fold anything over a bar, causing it to dry slower.

Also in the other thread it was recommended that I use all natural soaps instead of the generic detergent. I think thats it.

I like the washer, overall, it does its cycles so fast that I don't really have time to play games or something requiring concentration. I have been wearing the clothes washed in it for the past week and after the initial stiffness wears off they don't seem any different from a regular wash.

My one complaint is that the hoses are cheap, so I might figure out a replacement for those sometime next month. Also, I had to go to youtube to figure out how to use it properly

Gi hand washing advice needed [R]

3 years, 3 months agodemosthenes83 posted submission on bjj.
May 12, 2016

Hi,

I'm taking a spontaneous trip to Phuket and staying there for a month doing some BJJ. I was there two years back but I was 95% no gi as no one was wearing gis then. I have few questions concerning this: 1) How to wash them? Should I try to find a bucket or will bahtroom sink do? 1a) With what? Last time I used http://www.dettol.co.uk/products/pourable-liquids/dettol-disinfectant-liquid/ and washed my spats etc in the bathroom sink. This product is largely available and I also used some http://www.dettol.co.uk/products/bar-soaps/dettol-antibacterial-original-bar-soap/ for showers. 2) How long does it take to dry? And is it OK to leave it exposed to sun to dry faster? (I don't care about fading colors) 2a) Kind of continuing to last part, how many gis I should take with me? I was thinking two but will 24 hours be enough for gi to dry if I take morning and evening class then same on the day after.

Thanks in advance!

3 years, 3 months agodemosthenes83 posted on bjj.
May 13, 2016

wrote this for someone else... Copy/paste for you:

I grew up outside the first world for the most part, so washing by hand was a bit more natural to me. It's a bit of work, but a lot cheaper than paying for laundry, and much more convenient than traipsing off to the laundromat after every class. I've done this in a kitchen sink as well as a bathtub, so I know either will work. Also, I'd wash all the rest of your bjj clothes (undergarments, spats, rashguard, etc) at the same time. No point in letting them sit around sweaty.

OK, the first thing you're going to need is to get it soaked through with soapy water. Put the plug in the sink (everything applies the same in the bathtub, use whichever you prefer) and fill it up about 4-5 inches. Add the soap to the water and dissolve it in there. I'd use cool/cold water unless you're trying to shrink your gi. Add your bjj items one at a time starting with the gi jacket (it's the thickest piece). You want to make sure everything gets entirely saturated with soapy water-you should be able to tell by touch when it is. Just shake it around, rub it against itself a little, etc.

So you've gotten everything soapy-let it sit for a little-maybe 10 minutes. Then go and start hand washing your underthings, then your pants, then top. Google for instructions on hand washing, it's the same thing, you just are working with tougher material (ignore any instructions about 'hand wash only' items-washing delicates is a separate thing, nothing you're doing here is delicate). Basically you swish it around, scrunch it up, expand it, have it run against itself and the other items in the sink. You'll get the hang of it fairly quickly.

Then, empty the sink and fill it with clear water. You'll need to rinse most items 3 times or so, agitating them and squeezing and such to get all the soap out. If you have two sinks you can use them both here, working in one while the other fills.

Once that's done, wring your items out and hang them up. In the sun is best, over tile is good if indoors, or lay a towel or something to catch the drips. If your climate is cool and humid you might need a fan or the like to get enough airflow to dry them. Also, you almost Certainly will need to turn the gi inside out after 12 hours or so if you're not leaving it outside to dry.

I've used http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ with some thick plastic hangers both indoors and out, and I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice 'Charlie's Soap' brand laundry soap has worked, but any should work fine.

Don't worry too much about ruining anything-your gi is made of tough stuff. It's your knuckles and forearms that are going to get beat up during this process.

Washing your gi without a washing machine? [R]

3 years, 4 months agoApril 4, 2016

I don't have access to a washing machine atm. Anybody do this with a sink or a bathtub? Any tips?

3 years, 4 months agodemosthenes83 posted on bjj.
April 4, 2016

wrote this for someone else... Copy/paste for you:

I grew up outside the first world for the most part, so washing by hand was a bit more natural to me. It's a bit of work, but a lot cheaper than paying for laundry, and much more convenient than traipsing off to the laundromat after every class. I've done this in a kitchen sink as well as a bathtub, so I know either will work. Also, I'd wash all the rest of your bjj clothes (undergarments, spats, rashguard, etc) at the same time. No point in letting them sit around sweaty.

OK, the first thing you're going to need is to get it soaked through with soapy water. Put the plug in the sink (everything applies the same in the bathtub, use whichever you prefer) and fill it up about 4-5 inches. Add the soap to the water and dissolve it in there. I'd use cool/cold water unless you're trying to shrink your gi. Add your bjj items one at a time starting with the gi jacket (it's the thickest piece). You want to make sure everything gets entirely saturated with soapy water-you should be able to tell by touch when it is. Just shake it around, rub it against itself a little, etc.

So you've gotten everything soapy-let it sit for a little-maybe 10 minutes. Then go and start hand washing your underthings, then your pants, then top. Google for instructions on hand washing, it's the same thing, you just are working with tougher material (ignore any instructions about 'hand wash only' items-washing delicates is a separate thing, nothing you're doing here is delicate). Basically you swish it around, scrunch it up, expand it, have it run against itself and the other items in the sink. You'll get the hang of it fairly quickly.

Then, empty the sink and fill it with clear water. You'll need to rinse most items 3 times or so, agitating them and squeezing and such to get all the soap out. If you have two sinks you can use them both here, working in one while the other fills.

Once that's done, wring your items out and hang them up. In the sun is best, over tile is good if indoors, or lay a towel or something to catch the drips. If your climate is cool and humid you might need a fan or the like to get enough airflow to dry them. Also, you almost Certainly will need to turn the gi inside out after 12 hours or so if you're not leaving it outside to dry.

I've used http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ with some thick plastic hangers both indoors and out, and I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice 'Charlie's Soap' brand laundry soap has worked, but any should work fine.

Don't worry too much about ruining anything-your gi is made of tough stuff. It's your knuckles and forearms that are going to get beat up during this process.

Buying a second Gi. Washing your Gis. [R]

3 years, 5 months agodemosthenes83 posted submission on bjj.
March 20, 2016

So I've been training for a month and a bit now and we all know this martial art is not cheap. I still live with my parents and my family's not poor but is by no means "well off". I know all about staph and what not so I've been washing my gear after every practice. (Typically train 5 days a week.) The latest bills have come in and our hydro and electrical bill have gone way up since I've started training and doing laundry so often. (I used to do all my laundry once a week.) I know I have to start chipping in on the bills if I want to continue this. But I was thinking of buying a second GI and wearing one the first day and then washing both of them after the second day of training. That way splitting the amount of loads of laundry i do in half. Would it be risky to let a dirty GI sit for a day before washing it? If so have any of you been in a similar situation as me? Any suggestions at all? Thanks.

3 years, 5 months agodemosthenes83 posted on bjj.
March 22, 2016

I wouldn't worry about soaking before you get home. Just get it home then wash it thoroughly. Best you can do between use and wash is air dry, with sun exposure if possible.

Anyways, wrote this for someone else... Copy/paste for you:

I grew up outside the first world for the most part, so washing by hand was a bit more natural to me. It's a bit of work, but a lot cheaper than paying for laundry, and much more convenient than traipsing off to the laundromat after every class. I've done this in a kitchen sink as well as a bathtub, so I know either will work. Also, I'd wash all the rest of your bjj clothes (undergarments, spats, rashguard, etc) at the same time. No point in letting them sit around sweaty.

OK, the first thing you're going to need is to get it soaked through with soapy water. Put the plug in the sink (everything applies the same in the bathtub, use whichever you prefer) and fill it up about 4-5 inches. Add the soap to the water and dissolve it in there. I'd use cool/cold water unless you're trying to shrink your gi. Add your bjj items one at a time starting with the gi jacket (it's the thickest piece). You want to make sure everything gets entirely saturated with soapy water-you should be able to tell by touch when it is. Just shake it around, rub it against itself a little, etc.

So you've gotten everything soapy-let it sit for a little-maybe 10 minutes. Then go and start hand washing your underthings, then your pants, then top. Google for instructions on hand washing, it's the same thing, you just are working with tougher material (ignore any instructions about 'hand wash only' items-washing delicates is a separate thing, nothing you're doing here is delicate). Basically you swish it around, scrunch it up, expand it, have it run against itself and the other items in the sink. You'll get the hang of it fairly quickly.

Then, empty the sink and fill it with clear water. You'll need to rinse most items 3 times or so, agitating them and squeezing and such to get all the soap out. If you have two sinks you can use them both here, working in one while the other fills.

Once that's done, wring your items out and hang them up. In the sun is best, over tile is good if indoors, or lay a towel or something to catch the drips. If your climate is cool and humid you might need a fan or the like to get enough airflow to dry them. Also, you almost Certainly will need to turn the gi inside out after 12 hours or so if you're not leaving it outside to dry.

I've used http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ with some thick plastic hangers both indoors and out, and I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice 'Charlie's Soap' brand laundry soap has worked, but any should work fine.

Don't worry too much about ruining anything-your gi is made of tough stuff. It's your knuckles and forearms that are going to get beat up during this process.

When is it ethically okay to use LLBean's lifetime guarantee? [R]

3 years, 8 months agoDec. 10, 2015

[deleted]

3 years, 8 months agosarowen posted on femalefashionadvice.
Dec. 11, 2015

I have a [tripod-style drying rack] (http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1449867941&sr=8-1&keywords=hang+away+drying+rack) similar to this one. You can fold it up when it's not in use so that it doesn't take up so much space. Love it!

I might be going to live somewhere where I won't have a lot of access to washers and dryers, how can I keep my Gi smelling ok and hygienic if I'm going to Jiu jitsu 3x a week or so and only getting to do laundry once? [R]

3 years, 10 months agodemosthenes83 posted submission on bjj.
Oct. 17, 2015
3 years, 10 months agodemosthenes83 posted on bjj.
Oct. 17, 2015

Wrote this for someone else... Copy/paste for you:

I grew up outside the first world for the most part, so washing by hand was a bit more natural to me. It's a bit of work, but a lot cheaper than paying for laundry, and much more convenient than traipsing off to the laundromat after every class. I've done this in a kitchen sink as well as a bathtub, so I know either will work. Also, I'd wash all the rest of your bjj clothes (undergarments, spats, rashguard, etc) at the same time. No point in letting them sit around sweaty.

OK, the first thing you're going to need is to get it soaked through with soapy water. Put the plug in the sink (everything applies the same in the bathtub, use whichever you prefer) and fill it up about 4-5 inches. Add the soap to the water and dissolve it in there. I'd use cool/cold water unless you're trying to shrink your gi. Add your bjj items one at a time starting with the gi jacket (it's the thickest piece). You want to make sure everything gets entirely saturated with soapy water-you should be able to tell by touch when it is. Just shake it around, rub it against itself a little, etc.

So you've gotten everything soapy-let it sit for a little-maybe 10 minutes. Then go and start hand washing your underthings, then your pants, then top. Google for instructions on hand washing, it's the same thing, you just are working with tougher material (ignore any instructions about 'hand wash only' items-washing delicates is a separate thing, nothing you're doing here is delicate). Basically you swish it around, scrunch it up, expand it, have it run against itself and the other items in the sink. You'll get the hang of it fairly quickly.

Then, empty the sink and fill it with clear water. You'll need to rinse most items 3 times or so, agitating them and squeezing and such to get all the soap out. If you have two sinks you can use them both here, working in one while the other fills.

Once that's done, wring your items out and hang them up. In the sun is best, over tile is good if indoors, or lay a towel or something to catch the drips. If your climate is cool and humid you might need a fan or the like to get enough airflow to dry them. Also, you almost Certainly will need to turn the gi inside out after 12 hours or so if you're not leaving it outside to dry.

I've used http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ with some thick plastic hangers both indoors and out, and I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice 'Charlie's Soap' brand laundry soap has worked, but any should work fine.

Don't worry too much about ruining anything-your gi is made of tough stuff. It's your knuckles and forearms that are going to get beat up during this process.

Drying clothes inside an apartment that has a carpet? [R]

3 years, 10 months agoOct. 2, 2015

[deleted]

3 years, 10 months agofunobtainium posted on malefashionadvice.
Oct. 2, 2015

Collapsible rod in the bathroom (if you have an enclosed shower with a door and not a shower curtain rod) or a collapsible drying rack in the kitchen overnight, maybe?

Edit: if you're washing clothes in a machine, they shouldn't be dripping once you take them out...you can probably hang them anywhere, because they'll just be damp. If you're hand washing, lay something like a shirt out flat on a large, thick towel, roll sideways, then roll the rolled-up tight burrito the other way, making a snail shape. That''ll get a lot of water out. Sweaters should be dried flat on a mesh screen/flat rack.

Nepal Shirt came in, looks pretty dope (with pictures!) [R]

4 years, 1 month agoSupernova24 posted submission on DestinyTheGame.
June 29, 2015

http://imgur.com/a/qQw0g

I'm happy with it, but the material is a little thin and stretchy. Otherwise, its a comfortable shirt. The quality of the print is a little sketch too, so hopefully it holds up under multiple washes.

It's closer to a deep indigo/purple color instead of a navy blue, BTW.

4 years, 1 month agoSupernova24 posted on DestinyTheGame.
June 30, 2015

10/10 would be post WW2 housewife after reading that. And yes my wife has something similar to this where we hang our clothes to dry inside. As long as you don't smoke inside or are cooking at the moment your clothes should be fine.

General Discussion - May 19, 2015 [R]

4 years, 3 months agodailythought posted submission on femalefashionadvice.
May 19, 2015

In this thread, you can talk about whatever the hell you want. Talk about style, ask questions, talk about life, do whatever. Vent. Meet the community. It will be like IRC (except missing a very important robot).

If you're new to the community, please don't be shy! Say hello and introduce yourself. And if you've been here for a while, welcome our newer subscribers into the fold. =)

Note: Comment rules still apply, don't be a dick.

Text and idea shamelessly taken from Shujin.

4 years, 3 months agodailythought posted on femalefashionadvice.
May 20, 2015

This is the one I saw on Amazon: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002E3KYTS?sa-no-redirect=1&redirect=true&ref=sr1_7&keywords=clothes%20drying%20rack&qid=1432151432&sr=8-7&pldnSite=1

How do you ladies make it look so easy? [R]

4 years, 3 months agosarowen posted submission on femalefashionadvice.
May 7, 2015

My feet always blister, I sweat through all my clothes, my jeans never fit me quite right because they're tight as soon as they're out of the dryer but loose as shit after the end of a long day, I mean...

Does anyone have any success stories of going from frumpy dumpty to effortless fashionista?

I guess I'm just not realizing how much effort really goes into looking put together...

Edit: you guys are so helpful :')

4 years, 3 months agosarowen posted on femalefashionadvice.
May 7, 2015

When I run out of hangers with clips, I'll fold them in half and put them on a [plastic tubular hanger] (http://www.containerstore.com/shop/closet/hangers/plastic?productId=10007245). I also have a [Hangaway Collapsible Drying Rack] (http://www.qvc.com/Set-of-2-Hangaway-Collapsible-Drying-Racks.product.M12586.html), which is the most awesome thing ever. I'm kind of sad that QVC stopped selling them.

Edit - Just found [this drying rack] (http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ref=brlfm100123657111ttl?ie=UTF8&s=home-garden&pfrdp=1880841742&pfrds=center-3&pfrdt=1401&pfrdi=1001236571&pfrdm=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pfrdr=0WJYNPB9V2WCV758VHEJ) on Amazon -- it looks similar to the one that I have and love.

Tips on How to Wash Your BJJ Gi in the Bathtub [R]

4 years, 7 months agodemosthenes83 posted submission on bjj.
Jan. 15, 2015

Hey guys, I train BJJ 5 times a week or so and only have one gi. I have no access to a washing machine (I'll spare you the details just go with it). Anyone have tips on the best way to wash your gi in the bath?

4 years, 7 months agodemosthenes83 posted on bjj.
Jan. 15, 2015

Wrote this for someone else... Copy/paste for you:

I grew up outside the first world for the most part, so washing by hand was a bit more natural to me. It's a bit of work, but a lot cheaper than paying for laundry, and much more convenient than traipsing off to the laundromat after every class. I've done this in a kitchen sink as well as a bathtub, so I know either will work. Also, I'd wash all the rest of your bjj clothes (undergarments, spats, rashguard, etc) at the same time. No point in letting them sit around sweaty.

OK, the first thing you're going to need is to get it soaked through with soapy water. Put the plug in the sink (everything applies the same in the bathrub, use whichever you prefer) and fill it up about 4-5 inches. Add the soap to the water and dissolve it in there. I'd use cool/cold water unless you're trying to shrink your gi. Add your bjj items one at a time starting with the gi jacket (it's the thickest piece). You want to make sure everything gets entirely saturated with soapy water-you should be able to tell by touch when it is. Just shake it around, rub it against itself a little, etc.

So you've gotten everything soapy-let it sit for a little-maybe 10 minutes. Then go and start hand washing your underthings, then your pants, then top. Google for instructions on hand washing, it's the same thing, you just are working with tougher material (ignore any instructions about 'hand wash only' items-washing delicates is a separate thing, nothing you're doing here is delicate). Basically you swish it around, scrunch it up, expand it, have it run against itself and the other items in the sink. You'll get the hang of it fairly quickly.

Then, empty the sink and fill it with clear water. You'll need to rinse most items 3 times or so, agitating them and squeezing and such to get all the soap out. If you have two sinks you can use them both here, working in one while the other fills.

Once that's done, wring your items out and hang them up. In the sun is best, over tile is good if indoors, or lay a towel or something to catch the drips. If your climate is cool and humid you might need a fan or the like to get enough airflow to dry them. Also, you almost Certainly will need to turn the gi inside out after 12 hours or so if you're not leaving it outside to dry.

I've used http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ with some thick plastic hangers both indoors and out, and I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice 'Charlie's Soap' brand laundry soap has worked, but any should work fine.

Don't worry too much about ruining anything-your gi is made of tough stuff. It's your knuckles and forearms that are going to get beat up during this process.

Hand washing Gi [R]

4 years, 9 months agodemosthenes83 posted submission on bjj.
Nov. 19, 2014

So I am getting an apartment soon and will have coin operated laundry. To save money, but to also keep my gi as clean as possible I was considering hand washing it.

It is a black gi that I have had for a few months so its not brand new or anything. I practice about 3+ times a week and always wash after with a weekly, if not more often, soak with white vineagar (because washing it just doesn't get the jitsu stank out)

I was wondering if it is advisable to hand wash? I want to save up and get 2 more Gi's maybe even 3 so I have 1 per day and wash them all together so I don't have to do laundry 4-5 times a week.

How difficult is it to hand wash it? do you just put soap on it in the tub and scrub it into it self throughout? Vinegar recommended for soak?

4 years, 9 months agodemosthenes83 posted on bjj.
Nov. 19, 2014

I grew up outside the first world for the most part, so washing by hand was a bit more natural to me. It's a bit of work, but a lot cheaper than paying for laundry, and much more convenient than traipsing off to the laundromat after every class. I've done this in a kitchen sink as well as a bathtub, so I know either will work. Also, I'd wash all the rest of your bjj clothes (undergarments, spats, rashguard, etc) at the same time. No point in letting them sit around sweaty.

OK, the first thing you're going to need is to get it soaked through with soapy water. Put the plug in the sink (everything applies the same in the bathrub, use whichever you prefer) and fill it up about 4-5 inches. Add the soap to the water and dissolve it in there. I'd use cool/cold water unless you're trying to shrink your gi. Add your bjj items one at a time starting with the gi jacket (it's the thickest piece). You want to make sure everything gets entirely saturated with soapy water-you should be able to tell by touch when it is. Just shake it around, rub it against itself a little, etc.

So you've gotten everything soapy-let it sit for a little-maybe 10 minutes. Then go and start hand washing your underthings, then your pants, then top. Google for instructions on hand washing, it's the same thing, you just are working with tougher material (ignore any instructions about 'hand wash only' items-washing delicates is a separate thing, nothing you're doing here is delicate). Basically you swish it around, scrunch it up, expand it, have it run against itself and the other items in the sink. You'll get the hang of it fairly quickly.

Then, empty the sink and fill it with clear water. You'll need to rinse most items 3 times or so, agitating them and squeezing and such to get all the soap out. If you have two sinks you can use them both here, working in one while the other fills.

Once that's done, wring your items out and hang them up. In the sun is best, over tile is good if indoors, or lay a towel or something to catch the drips. If your climate is cool and humid you might need a fan or the like to get enough airflow to dry them. Also, you almost Certainly will need to turn the gi inside out after 12 hours or so if you're not leaving it outside to dry.

I've used http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ with some thick plastic hangers both indoors and out, and I've been pleasantly surprised by how nice 'Charlie's Soap' brand laundry soap has worked, but any should work fine.

Don't worry too much about ruining anything-your gi is made of tough stuff. It's your knuckles and forearms that are going to get beat up during this process.

Laundry in University [R]

4 years, 11 months agoSept. 2, 2014

[deleted]

4 years, 11 months ago[deleted] posted on malefashionadvice.
Sept. 2, 2014

I would wash your clothes often... dress shirts I wash after 2 wears if I didn't really sweat and wore an undershirt. T shirts and other stuff that touches skin directly I wash after every wear. I use http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002E3KYTS/ref=oxyaosproductrefresh_T1 and find it a decent solution. (I got it when it was 20 though, not sure why its so expensive now)

Need help being frugal with doing laundry. My apartment's coin machines are a rip off. [R]

5 years, 2 months agoMay 29, 2014

[deleted]

5 years, 2 months agofrugalthrowaway87 posted on Frugal.
June 3, 2014

I bought some new dress shirts for work and didn't want to put them in the dryer because it seems that every time I do they come out shrunk or just don't fit like they used to, so I bought this: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B002E3KYTS/ref=ohdetailso02s00i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

It's flimsy but works for the 5-6 shirts and 3 pairs of pants I hang on it at once. I've started air drying all my clothes now, as I realized I was just putting tshirts and underwear in the wash before. Saves me $1.50 per drying cycle (mine are even more expensive than yours).

I then bought a $40 clothes steamer from Target to get all the wrinkles out (I hate ironing!). Works like a charm.

How do you keep the clothes that aren't clean but not unclean enough for laundry either organised? [R]

5 years, 4 months agoButtFartMcPoopus posted submission on femalefashionadvice.
April 19, 2014

Ok, I admit this one is a little weird. And apologies if this is an inappropriate sub to ask, but it's the best I could think of as I know there must be others here who've had this problem.

I used to always wear the same type of outfit every day but ever since that's changed and I added some more variation to my wardrobe, I find my bedroom filled with clothes that I've worn already and plan on wearing again without washing. Because that'd be a waste of water, electricity, effort and would needlessly wear out the clothes more.

Think stuff like cardigans in specific colours that don't go with every outfit, different types of jeans, dresses and tops I've worn with something under them, skirts etc. Might be a couple of days until I wear them again, might be a month. In the mean time, they have to be in a place, preferably where I can find them.

I feel weird putting those back in my closet on top of a pile of freshly washed stuff, it clearly doesn't belong there. Definitely can't just have it laying on the floor either.

I used to just have those things hanging over the chair that's in my bedroom, but am now way past the point where you can actually still sit on it as well. Also: not really able to find the skirt I'm looking for in the mess. So that 'system' is no longer working.

So. How do I keep the semi-dirty clothes organised? I was considering a dedicated shelve in my closet for them, but that might make them smell due to being in a small closed off space.

I suppose I could just switch to wearing the same thing for multiple days in a row more often rather than re-wearing them next week, but that'd annoy me plus I'd worry people would notice.

Surely, someone's solved this long ago?

5 years, 4 months agoButtFartMcPoopus posted on femalefashionadvice.
April 20, 2014

Oh man, I struggled with this for SO LONG. It doesn't feel right hanging up worn clothes right next to my clean clothes, even if I consider them 'clean' enough to wear again.

After a million years of keeping them in crumpled piles somewhere, I finally got this compact laundry/drying rack. I keep it in the corner of my bedroom and anything that's in this 'in between stage' gets hung on it. Keeps everything separate, unwrinkled, and I also have a good visual of what I need to wear again before I start dirtying more clothes. I love it so much.

Can we talk about laundry? How does everyone take care of their clothes? [R]

6 years agodevinesigns posted submission on femalefashionadvice.
July 24, 2013

Growing up, my parents just tossed everything in the washer and dryer- heavy load, high heat. I've noticed that clothes pill faster, lose shape, and become thinner using this method.

Recently I've tried to be more careful with my clothes. So far, I still wash most of my things in the washing machine, but on the delicate cycle. I dry cotton items on low heat and try not to let it go too long.

I try to follow the care instructions on the tags, but sometimes they can be wrong or misguiding. So my question to you is: How do you wash and dry your clothes?

Follow-up/bonus question: how do you deal with hanging things up to dry if you live in a very small house with limited space? Any cool tips/tricks?

EDIT: Wow, this got a lot of responses! Thanks so much for helping a clueless gal out :D

6 years agodevinesigns posted on femalefashionadvice.
July 25, 2013

Ha! My parents did the same thing which is why I took over my own laundry at a young age :)

First, never buy anything "dry clean only" and if you have to, I typically use Dryel.

For normal laundry, only bras with underwire get hand washed. Everything else gets washed on warm/cold, gentle cycle. I use Charlie's Soap laundry detergent- no dyes/fragrance/etc; it's really cheap and gets clothes cleaner than most liquid detergents I've tried.

I hang dry all of my everyday shirts, bathing suits, and anything else delicate (like nice underwear or Spanx). Everything else- cotton underwear, workout clothes, pants, etc- I dry on medium heat.

Since we have limited space, we use these for hang drying:

For shirts- http://www.amazon.com/Household-Essentials-Collapsible-Indoor-Clothes/dp/B002E3KYTS/ref=sr16?ie=UTF8&qid=1374752652&sr=8-6&keywords=clothes+hanging+rack

For everything else- http://www.amazon.com/Whitmor-6023-741-Folding-Clothes-Drying/dp/B001UE8ILI/ref=sr12?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1374752681&sr=1-2&keywords=clothes+drying+rack