American Weigh Scales SC Series Digital Pocket Weight Scale, Silver, 2000G, 2KG x 0.1

American Weigh Scales

Is this Cheap?

- The best price we've seen on Amazon in the past 12 months was on March 27, 2019. The current price is considered high. It is 42% higher than the cost at its lowest.


Table of Contents

currently high price

Up 44%

Updated September 16, 2019
Last Sale

Sep 15

for 1 day

Price Checks

Current price is higher than the price on Sep 15, 2019.
Current price is high in the past 12 months.
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Price Activity

DatePrice ActionChange %Price Level
16 Sep, 2019Sale End44.22%high
15 Sep, 2019On Sale-0.79%low
14 Sep, 2019Price Drop-3.82%low
13 Sep, 2019Price Drop-5.29%low
12 Sep, 2019Price Drop-21.00%low
Update on 16 Sep, 2019

Amazon.com price change % swings above and below average price

Showing: Area under 0 show price is cheaper than average. Above 0 shows higher price than average.

Best Alternative Recommendations

We also found 8 products that redditors have recommended that are the best alternative to this product or are related accessories.

Recommended in Ultralight

 

Recommended in Coffee

           

Recommended in Fitness

 
American Weigh Scales SC Series Digital Pocket Weight Scale, Silver, 2000G, 2KG x 0.1

Product Details

  • Amazon.com Sold on
  • B001RF3XJ2 Amazon ASIN
  • American Weigh Scales Brand
  • AMW-SC-2KG Model Number
  • Categories

    Scales, Kitchen & Dining, Home & Kitchen, Measuring Tools & Scales, Kitchen Utensils & Gadgets, Digital Scales

Reddit Reviews and Recommendations

  • 180 Reviews
  • Aug. 14, 2019 Last Review Date
  • March 31, 2013 First Seen Review Date
  • 24 Reviewed on Subreddits

    Coffee (143)
    espresso (5)
    Ultralight (4)
    loseit (4)
    tea (3)
    AskCulinary (2)
    Random_Acts_Of_Amazon (2)
    1200isjerky (1)
    Breadit (1)
    Cooking (1)
    and 14 more...

Discussion and Reviews on Reddit

Question- has anyone used the Coffee Gator digital scale? It’s on sale on Amazon right now and I’m thinking of buying it [R]

1 month agoapeschell posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 13, 2019

My current scale is not very precise and has latency issues. On top of that, it requires these kind of hard to find batteries (not really but they’re not as easy to find as AAAs) and they always die real quick.

I have a coffee gator canister which I like but have not used any of their other products.

Thoughts? It would be $23.99 which is a great price.

I know that Hario and Acaia are the main contenders but at this time, they’re a bit out of my price range. Well, maybe Hario I can make happen but just trying to consider all my options.

1 month agoapeschell posted comment on Coffee.
Aug. 14, 2019

I use an American Weighs scale and feel it does a great job measuring to the 10th of a gram. Around $20 on Amazon. I've had it for probably 1.5 years and no issues so far.

Edit:. 2 years and going strong. Link: American Weigh Scales SC Series Digital Pocket Weight Scale, Silver, 2000G, 2KG x 0.1 https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_dzbvDbMC4D6SZ

Looking For A New Coffee Setup [R]

1 month, 4 weeks agoGangstaAnthropology posted submission on Coffee.
July 19, 2019

I've had a Nespresso machine for a little over a year now and for a while I've been unsatisfied with the coffee it is producing. I've been looking at getting a Chemex... AKA simplifying my coffee setup.

Does anyone have experience with both?

I love the ease of the Nespresso machine but I miss the simplicity of pour over/filter coffee and amazing coffee in general.

Side bar I am a professional barista and was for a time considering a grind to cup portafilter machine but now that sounds nightmarish.

1 month, 4 weeks agoGangstaAnthropology posted comment on Coffee.
July 19, 2019

I was overwhelmed with reading all of the options when I got into this. After a lot of reading I got a Chemex.

Oxo kettle

OXO On Adjustable Temperature Electric Pour-Over Kettle https://www.amazon.com/dp/B074KHPS7F/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_wMMmDbCR9T648

Baratza encore

Baratza Encore Conical Burr Coffee Grinder https://www.amazon.com/dp/B007F183LK/ref=cm_sw_r_cp_api_i_YNMmDbPHSKK4G

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG... https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2?ref=ppx_pop_mob_ap_share

These four things were the most highly recommended from all chemex posts on this sub. These are the basics, and from there I used tons of different beans

Can you get a non-electric scale accurate to 0.1g? [R]

2 months, 3 weeks agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
June 24, 2019

I'm learning the art of coffee and tea, and I plan on getting a scale to measure out both.

I love mechanical things, and would like to get a complete setup that wouldn't require electricity to operate. So does anyone know of a portable scale (balance, etc) that would be accurate down to 0.1g?

If it's not possible, I'll just go with an electric scale which can be picked up fairly cheap.

2 months, 3 weeks agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
June 24, 2019

Barista Express extraction time [R]

2 months, 3 weeks agooriboaz posted submission on Coffee.
June 22, 2019

Hi I just upgraded to a Sage Barista Express. I have dialled in my favourite beans so that it hits the middle of the pressure guage but my extraction time (from pressing button not first drip) is only 20 seconds.

I was wondering what I should do now to increase extraction time.

As I'm hitting the pressure correctly does that mean I should not change the dose amount or grind settings anymore and change the program length to be longer instead.

Or should I just leave it as it is now?

2 months, 3 weeks agooriboaz posted comment on Coffee.
June 22, 2019

Hi,

I also have the same machine. For a long time, I was content with the situation you described above. I would put my beans into the hopper, grind an approximate amount, tamp, and hope for the best. Indeed, the pressure gauge would often be in the correct range, but extraction times -- including pre-infusion -- would be about 20 or so seconds. Then, I discovered this reddit, and specifically, this post. You should read it. I now use a very similar method to the one described there. Here is what I do:

  1. Do not store beans in the hopper. (They would stale faster: the container is see through, the lid isn't air-tight, and the top of the machine is warm).
  2. Turn on the machine, and run water through the group head and portafilter. Use a cloth to dry and clean the portafilter and group head.
  3. Using a small scale such as this, weigh the amount of coffee you are going to brew. I like 18g in a double (non-pressurized) basket, and place in the hopper.
  4. Grind the beans into the portafilter. I like to grind using the `single shot' setting, set to the shortest time. I need 2.5 pushes of the grind button to grind the desired amount (you hear the grinder sound change when done). While grinding, I slightly rock the portafilter up and down, and also use a skewer to break clumps. When done, I smooth the grind bed with my fingers, and use the tamper to tamp the ground coffee.
  5. Lock the portafilter handle in place, and place a cup, on top of the scale, below the spout. Turn on the scale; it should show 0.
  6. Hit the double-shot button, and watch the scale. When the scale hits your desired extraction (I use 1:2, or 36g), or close to it, stop the extraction by hitting the double-shot button again. I like to time this; I currently hit about 28 seconds from button press to finished extraction. (Of this time, pre-infusion takes about 10 seconds).
  7. If the shot is too fast or too slow, in the next brew I change the grinder setting. (So, it may take me a few cups of coffee to find the right grinder setting).

(I intend to buy a better grinder. I've read here that it improves shot quality *a lot*.)

By the way: even if you don't intend to use weight as a guide, I highly suggest grinding in two-three bursts. This will greatly decrease the amount of wasted coffee!

[MOD] Show off your gear! - Battle-station Central [R]

5 months, 3 weeks agomrdeeds23 posted submission on Coffee.
March 25, 2019

Hello everyone! It's time for the weekly Gear Show!

Let's see your battle-stations or new purchases! Tell us what it is you have, post pictures if you want, let us know what you think and how you use it all to make your daily Cup of Joe.

Feel free to post links to where people can get the gear but please no sketchy deal sites and none of those Amazon (or other site) links where you get a percentage if people buy it, they will be removed. Also, if you want battle-stations every day of the week instead of just Mondays, check out /r/coffeestations!

Thanks!

5 months, 3 weeks agomrdeeds23 posted comment on Coffee.
March 28, 2019

Can somebody please recommend me a decent 1kg scale for home brewing? Doesn’t need to be water proof. Mostly used for V60. [R]

5 months, 3 weeks agotimoseewho posted submission on Coffee.
March 25, 2019
5 months, 3 weeks agotimoseewho posted comment on Coffee.
March 25, 2019

this one from AWS is a start, weighs up to 2kg to 0.1g

A scale for both a chemex and a breville 870xl ? [R]

10 months, 1 week agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 7, 2018

Hey guys, I'm looking for a scale that I could use for my chemex, but ideally I'm looking for one that could also fit on the tray of my espresso machine (breville 870xl). Of course it would have to do 0.1.

Does such a balance exist? What could you recommend? I'm looking for the cheapest possible, but all recommandations are welcome.

Thank you

10 months, 1 week agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
Nov. 7, 2018

This one is cheap, works great, and fits my 870.

Lets talk scales [R]

10 months, 3 weeks agodustednuggets posted submission on espresso.
Oct. 29, 2018

Just wondering what everyone uses, currently, I'm using an OXO food scale to measure weigh my portafilter+grinds, and then using a standard pot scale to measure my shots. I'm tempted to get and Acaia pearl but at $300 CAD it's a bit steep when my current situation works but is troublesome, one small scare would clear up tons of space.

10 months, 3 weeks agodustednuggets posted comment on espresso.
Oct. 30, 2018

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapaiHRf2BbW9J0VJ3

Its a bit more expensive than when I bought it. Still well worth the money.

Coffee newb looking for some "good coffee" to try [R]

10 months, 3 weeks agojudioverde posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2018

So most of my life I've mostly drank instant coffee like Nescafe, perked Folgers with sugar and creamer, and Tim Hortons (double double).

I've recently started drinking black coffee because instead of having the extra calories from sugar and creamer. I tried Tim Hortons black this morning and to me it's kinda nasty and bitter. The thing is I don't know if this is just how black coffee tastes the majority of the time or if it's just bad coffee?

What should I try?

10 months, 3 weeks agojudioverde posted comment on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2018

For a cheap, easy set up at home, you could get a french press. Getting freshly roasted coffee is pretty important, so look up if there are any roasters near you. Grinding at home with a burr grinder is ideal, but if you aren't ready for that yet you can have them ground for you. Ground coffee gets stale much quicker tham whole beans. You also do not need to get the coffee super course ground like a lot of people say, it can be just a little coarser than your normal store bought preground coffee. Look up the James Hoffman French Press technique, it truly works. I usually like a 1:14 ratio of coffee to water. So for one person, 20 grams of coffee to 280 grams of water. I think medium roast coffee works well with a French press. That being said I prefer to use a V60 for my coffee making. A Melitta or Aeropress would be good options for someone starting out. Also would recommend getting a cheap scale like this

What sub-$50 scale should I buy on Amazon? [R]

10 months, 4 weeks agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 22, 2018
10 months, 4 weeks agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
Oct. 22, 2018

AWS 2kg. $20.50. Has 0.1g resolution. Mine works great! Its often recommended here by others.

Started dosing by weight [R]

11 months agosamreaves posted submission on espresso.
Oct. 19, 2018
11 months agosamreaves posted comment on espresso.
Oct. 19, 2018

Have this one and it works great.

I did have to order a replacement though as the first came miscalibrated (probably due to a fall during shipping). To avoid that, it may be beneficial to order a scale that includes a calibration weight, like this one.

5 bite diet [R]

11 months agoiLostWeight38 posted submission on loseit.
Oct. 15, 2018

I’m sure if you have googled the word “diet”, “weight loss”, “belly fat tips & tricks”, etc. etc you’ve seen this diet pop up. Well I have been researching this diet for the past 3-4 years. Practicing? Doing? Losing weight successfully? Nope. Researching? As in reading about it, saying I’ll start Monday and then continuing that trend for 4 years. So I have gained and lost the same 20-25 pounds over and over again. I am one of those people that thinks I need to eat all of the good food before I start a diet. Decrease all temptation ya know...logic? Any who...I just received a positive herpes simplex diagnosis so in order to prevent outbreaks I really need to decrease the fat and increase my intake of healthy foods and such things. When reading the “Why Weight Around Book” it tells about the dangers of excess fat and your immune system so I’m going to try and give my body the one-two punch. If anyone has done this diet and has any successful anecdotes that would be much appreciated! Oh and please do not leave negative, degrading or depressing remarks about a herpes diagnosis. I will fuck you up with facts if necessary. Peace and love.

11 months agoiLostWeight38 posted comment on loseit.
Oct. 15, 2018

If you’re looking to decrease fat intake any calorie tracking app will also show you a breakdown of the fat /protein / carb content of all the foods you eat. You can plan your new diet accordingly by scanning and logging foods that you normally eat, and removing foods that have a high fat content.

Some good proteins to eat for low-fat diets would be

  • White fish
  • White meat chicken
  • Scallops
  • Shrimp
  • Tofu

Pair that with some good veg and starches like rice, noddles, or quinoa and you’re on your way to a low fat healthy diet

Edit: almost forgot, if you’re trying to lose weight the only way to do that is to burn more calories than you take in, so buying a food scale and using a calorie tracking app are essential. Pair that with a low fat diet and you should be good to go

Edit 2: if you’re looking to decrease fat, it’s essential that you strictly measure any cooking oil or dressings as well such as butter. This scale is great for that purpose because it can measure within 1/10th of a gram

Short extraction with Sage Barista Express [R]

11 months, 2 weeks agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 4, 2018

I bought really fresh coffee roasted quite lately (maybe a week), when making espresso, it seems like everything is good - pressure, pre infusion time (cca 5-7 sec.) but total time of extracting 2x30ml (double filter) is max 15-20 seconds since pushing the button (machine is set to extract 60 ml for 2 cups and 30 ml for 1 cup).

When I grind finer, pressure is higher and it seems to be over-extracted, but brewing time increased only slightly.

What I'm doing wrong?

11 months, 2 weeks agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
Oct. 5, 2018

Get a scale with 0.1g resolution. You will find that changing the dose by 0.1g can significantly change the extraction time. This one is cheap and works great.

The default yield will almost always be sub-optimal. Pull your shot in manual mode, and measure yield with your scale. One you are dialed in, you can program your yield into the brew button.

Any experience with this scale? [R]

1 year agotee2djday posted submission on Coffee.
Sept. 6, 2018

I was looking to get a budget-friendly scale.

Any experience with this ERAVSOW scale. It has solid reviews on Amazon, but I'm not sure if they are "real" reviews.
https://www.amazon.com/ERAVSOW-Digital-Stainless-precision-Batteries/dp/B075YBD4YQ/ref=cm_cr_arp_d_product_top?ie=UTF8

Any and all other recommendations are welcomed.

1 year agotee2djday posted comment on Coffee.
Sept. 10, 2018

Is it this one ? https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=oxscsavedtitle10?smid=ATVPDKIKX0DER&psc=1

Hario Scale - What has your experience been with it? [R]

1 year, 2 months agohopesdead posted submission on Coffee.
July 12, 2018

My cheap jewelery scale broke this afternoon

Considering getting the Hario scale, but I'm seeing complaints about it breaking on Amazon.

For those that have it, what has your experience been with it? Has it withstood minor liquid spills etc?

1 year, 2 months agohopesdead posted comment on Coffee.
July 12, 2018

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr11_sspa?ie=UTF8&qid=1531425751&sr=8-1-spons&keywords=american+weigh+scales&psc=1

It is small but you can easily fit a AeroPress or a Hario server on it.

Scale Recommendations for Pour Over [R]

1 year, 2 months agoChefBones posted submission on Coffee.
July 7, 2018

I’ve been using Amazon’s “choice” Etekcity for a few months now, and it’s gone haywire (counting down grams as I’m pouring water—yikes). It was only $13 and had accuracy to just 1 gram, so I’m not surprised. Anyone here have a scale that’s been super reliable for them, preferably with 0.1 accuracy and not too expensive? Shooting for a price under $30 but understand if reliability’s price tag is higher. Thanks!!

1 year, 2 months agoChefBones posted comment on Coffee.
July 7, 2018

I'm going to disagree with the Hario scale. Anecdotally, I found the measurements to have a significant delay when measuring slowly increasing amounts, such as water in a pourover. In addition to not very reactive buttons. Also, the $45 price tag is a bit high, when there are more responsive scales out there, I mostly think you're paying for the name here.

I like this AWS much better.

But if you want/need high end coffee nerd toys and cost is no object, the Acacia is the ultimate pour over scale. High reactive to weight changes, bluetooth compatiable, with the ability to track brew times and weights.

Scale Recommendations for Pour Over [R]

1 year, 2 months agotraveler19395 posted submission on Coffee.
July 7, 2018

I’ve been using Amazon’s “choice” Etekcity for a few months now, and it’s gone haywire (counting down grams as I’m pouring water—yikes). It was only $13 and had accuracy to just 1 gram, so I’m not surprised. Anyone here have a scale that’s been super reliable for them, preferably with 0.1 accuracy and not too expensive? Shooting for a price under $30 but understand if reliability’s price tag is higher. Thanks!!

1 year, 2 months agotraveler19395 posted comment on Coffee.
July 7, 2018

>About those 10-20$ scales: Some of them are accurate to 0.1g (great if you're doing espresso), but you can't put your V60 or Chemex on it because it simply cannot measure over 500g. And some of them are accurate to 1 gram which is not that great if you're trying to be precise, but they can easily measure up to 1000 g. I have one of each of these cheap stuff.

This just isn't true. There are several similar scales on Amazon in that $10-20 range that go up to 2-3kg with 0.1g accuracy. And they work well. I've had this one for 7-8 years and it's still going great. I have also picked up two very similar ones that are $13-15 and they have been working well for a few years.

[Gear] Seeking advice on my scale purchase [R]

1 year, 2 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
June 26, 2018

I picked up one of these small guys. That's the problem..it's definitely small.

I have a profitec portafilter which is quite larger than the scale's measuring surface. With the addition of a flat piece of material & ground coffee it exceeds the weight.

Any suggestions on a different scale for these portafilters? They're about 1.3 lbs. It'd be nice to measure the portafilter and the shots being pulled with one scale (that isn't $200+)

Thank you for your help.

1 year, 2 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
June 27, 2018

This one is often recommended here. It goes up to 2KG (4.4 lbs).

Getting an aeropress! What next? [R]

1 year, 3 months agotimoseewho posted submission on Coffee.
June 5, 2018

I’m going to college in the fall and I’m getting an aeropress! It seems like the best option since it isn’t super pricey and I usually drink cold coffee. I’m looking for a grinder, but don’t want to spend too much money. Should I even buy one? I could just ask a local coffee shop to grind everything for me...? Ones near me tend to be kinda pricey (I can understand why) so idk I’ll probably get stuff from them every now and then. Is the pre-packaged coffee at the grocery store that’s already grinded fine? Also, what are good coffee brands that I can get at a grocery store?

1 year, 3 months agotimoseewho posted comment on Coffee.
June 6, 2018

a scale, even a $20 one works

Scale recommendations [R]

1 year, 4 months agoxzackly7 posted submission on Coffee.
April 24, 2018

Nothing fancy. It's a gift for my grandfather, preferably under $20.

1 year, 4 months agoxzackly7 posted comment on Coffee.
April 25, 2018

The jennings and https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2 are likely candidates right now. Something to plug in would be nice for my grandfather so he doesn't need to put batteries in

Scale recommendations [R]

1 year, 4 months agoJoshAddington posted submission on Coffee.
April 24, 2018

Nothing fancy. It's a gift for my grandfather, preferably under $20.

1 year, 4 months agoJoshAddington posted comment on Coffee.
April 24, 2018

I've been using the AMW-SC-2KG for ~4 years. I love it.

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=pdsim791?encoding=UTF8&pdrdi=B001RF3XJ2&pdrdr=8AB1VHEAG8VV9BYPQVDJ&pdrdw=sEcWs&pdrdwg=pFl2D&psc=1&refRID=8AB1VHEAG8VV9BYPQVDJ

Best espresso scale (on a budget)? [R]

1 year, 4 months agomonigram posted submission on espresso.
April 23, 2018

Like the title says I'm looking for the best espresso scale, preferably under $40. It would be wonderful to have something that is responsive enough that I can use it on the drip tray to monitor the volume of the shots. I'm not sure if that's too much to ask for that price. Any suggestions are appreciated!

1 year, 4 months agomonigram posted comment on espresso.
April 23, 2018

These work. Not as fast as some, but you can very good results with a little practice.

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

(edited for typo)

Why does my single cup pourover seem to make two cups? [R]

1 year, 4 months agoibegross posted submission on Coffee.
April 21, 2018

Hello, recently I got a Hario V60 single cup and i followed a recipe from Stumptown for one cup. I used one scoop of beans and I believe I followed the instructions properly, but it makes a ton of coffee (about 450ml). What am I doing wrong?

Also, I got a Hario scale and I'm confused on how to use it. Today when I was making coffee, it pretty much sat at 0g and I kept clicking tare and then it slowly crept up as the coffee sat there on the scale. It seems to have a mind of its own and I'm completely new to this.. am I doing it wrong?

I'm an Aeropress guy so I'm new to pourover and I haven't used a scale in the past. Thanks

1 year, 4 months agoibegross posted comment on Coffee.
April 21, 2018

This one from Amazon.

Best scale <$5 [R]

1 year, 5 months agoradddchaddd posted submission on Coffee.
April 11, 2018

Looking for a functional scale <$50?

1 year, 5 months agoradddchaddd posted comment on Coffee.
April 11, 2018

Depending in the size you want and if you want a timer, this American Weigh scale is great at its price point.

Coffee snob in NYC with just one problem... [R]

1 year, 5 months agoBritasianninja posted submission on Coffee.
April 4, 2018

I'm cheap! I love good coffee and despite the infestation of Starbucks and Dunkin every half a block there are lots of great coffee shops as well (in Manhattan anyways). But yes, I'm extremely frugal and not a fan of dropping $2.50 - $3 a day ($662 - $1095 a year) on coffee. I have a french press and want to start making at home.

So I am in the market for coffee beans that are only a week away or so from roasting and come in at a good price. Any suggestions?

1 year, 5 months agoBritasianninja posted comment on Coffee.
April 4, 2018

Hey, so I was in the exact same situation as you - I moved to Manhattan, but couldn't justify paying $3+ dollars for a cup of decent coffee (especially considering I would regularly drink more than 1 cup).

I should probably preface this with: In the end, I'm probably not saving much more money (especially short-term), since I just spent the money I might have saved on more coffee equipment (and somehow I keep ending up with more...). But now I have incredible coffee at home, and it's a fun hobby to tinker with, so I have no regrets there.

  • As previously mentioned, pick up a decent entry-level burr grinder - The Hario Mini is ~$35, though you get a Skerton Pro for ~$55. Grinding your own beans immediately pre-brew produces significantly better results than buying pre-ground, and allows you to control and fine-tune the grind level. (I upgraded to a Lido 3 in December, and while love it, at $200 it's hardly a budget saver).

  • Buy some beans online. I would highly recommend S&W Roasting. You can pick up a sample pack for ~$20 with shipping, and while it's advertised as 1lb of coffee, I received closer to 2.5lbs the first time I ordered (they seriously pad their packages). All their coffee is phenomenal, plus they seem like really nice guys, so they have my business. Alternatively, Happy Mug sells bags @ $11/lb with $3 shipping, so it comes out to $14/lb.

  • Pick up a cheap scale - making coffee with reliable measurements and not by estimation produces dependable, replicable results. The same is true of baking and making cocktails. I have a basic AMW-SC-2KG, which currently runs ~$22.

  • Find a decent online guide, and practice with it.

Hope this helps!

[edit] formatting

Home espresso set up must-haves? [R]

1 year, 5 months agoradddchaddd posted submission on Coffee.
April 1, 2018

Hey all, First time submitting here. I'm getting a new espresso set up soon, and I want to make sure I get all that I need. I already have a grinder and am ordering cups, tamper and mat, cleaning solution, and towels. Anything I'm missing? Thanks for the help!

1 year, 5 months agoradddchaddd posted comment on Coffee.
April 1, 2018

Do you weigh? [R]

1 year, 5 months ago_FormerFarmer posted submission on espresso.
March 31, 2018

I tried weighing shots this week. All I learned is that I naturally level my espresso to 18g consistently.

Next I'll try weighing the finished shot, but I don't see how this will be different from filling my glass. I expect the same result.

Do you weigh?

1 year, 5 months ago_FormerFarmer posted comment on espresso.
April 1, 2018

A different model than the other American Weigh Scale, the American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG has the same range and capacity as the Coffee Gear scale and is ~$21. It receives lots of mentions for coffee use, lots of folk like them, some report easy to break or issues with accurate weights.

French pressed coffee tastes like water [R]

1 year, 6 months agojamievlong posted submission on Coffee.
March 16, 2018

Hi there, I am new to the french press world. I purchased coarse ground Columbian Coffee from Big Y (used a grinder in the grocery store) This is what I did:

4 Tbsp of Coffee grinds 1.75 Cups of water (I boiled the water, waited 30 seconds before pouring)

I poured the coffee grinds into my french press, once the water boiled, I waited 30 seconds, then poured half into the coffee grinds. I let that sit for 30 seconds and stirred it. Then I poured the rest of the water into my french press. I let it sit for 4 minutes. Then I pressed the coffee.

I've tried multiple combinations, using less coffee, less water, etc. My french pressed coffee still tastes like water.

Advice would be appreciated!

1 year, 6 months agojamievlong posted comment on Coffee.
March 16, 2018

It seems like you're at least brewing long enough. There is a possibility that the coffee grounds might be too coarse. As for the ratio of table spoons to cups of water, it might be hard for me to help you there. The old rule of thumb was 2 Tbsp:6oz water. I started out using this and eye-balling everything when I first got into doing manual brew coffee. I use scales and weigh everything now. I will be honest, trying to trouble shoot with Tbsp and oz is difficult. I know this may not be the answer you're looking for, but I would recommend buying a cheap scale. Once you have a scale, you will eliminate a lot of guessing and be more exact.

This is the first scale I got which was recommended by Blue Bottle as a great entry-level scale:

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr14?ie=UTF8&qid=1521221481&sr=8-4&keywords=american+weigh+scale

I still use this scale at work and for travel. My main scale I use is the Acaia Lunar. You don't need to buy an expensive scale with all the bells and whistles, you just need something that gets the job done.

Scales [R]

1 year, 6 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
March 9, 2018

I looking for a new scale. I don't think I need bluetooth connectivity. I do want .1 gram accuracy. I was looking at the Salter Heston Blumenthal Dual Platform Precision Scale - it has 2 scales built in, a 200 gm scale that measure s to .1 gms, and a 10 kg scale that measures to 1 gram. 10 kg is more than I need. I'll use this for breadmaking, coffee roasting, and coffee making.

There are a lot of 2 kg x .1 gm scales out there - but my Chemex, plus filter, plus coffee, plus water is just over the 2kg mark. So if I go with a 2 kg scale for the .1 accuracy I would need a second scale for brewing anyway.

I've looked at the Brewista, the Hario, the Acaia Lunas, the Luna seems over-kill to me. The Brewista has too many pre-programed routines that I don't see the need for, the hario gets bad reviews for durability - esp around moisture.

1 year, 6 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
March 9, 2018

I had the Hario and I had issues with it. I had one of these: https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2 and it worked really well. It doesn't have a timer and you do need to put something thick on it to act as a barrier for the heat from your cup/chemex. But, if you put the Chemex and everything on it, then tare it out, it still has 0.1g sensitivity. I just tested it out, and it will read up to 2000g again, even with 1000g before the tare, and still have 0.1g sensitivity. Then you can just use a kitchen timer or your phone to keep the time.

Newbie help: Sour shots on Breville Infuser [R]

1 year, 7 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on espresso.
Feb. 5, 2018

Hey guys! I'm a pour-over vet, but new to the espresso game & I'm having troubles with my Infuser. I keep getting sour shots even at crazy long brew times. I recently went to a nearby shop & had them make me a shot so I would know what flavor I'm aiming for, but I cannot replicate it for the life of me.

I've read a bunch and know the basics of dialing things in, ie only mess with one variable at a time. The only thing I'm toying with now is the grind & I have a Sette 270 so I've got plenty to play with. The Infuser has preinfusion & I've started tracking that time as well as the total brew time. I've read conflicting opinions saying that you should time when the water touches the coffee or when the first drops of espresso hit the cup as long as you're consistent. Now that I'm tracking pre-infusion I start when the pump starts & then "brew time" is when the first drips hit the cup.

The two most recent shots below tasted similarly sour on the first sip despite the total time being 22 seconds different. I know there are a lot of variables to possibly mess up, but I feel like I'm keeping things tight enough to not have this result. I also know that this is all subjective to my taste & the rules aren't set in stone, but if I'm trying to avoid a sour shot & somehow still getting it at 52 seconds I've gotta be doing something wrong.

Hoping you experts can help a newbie out. Thanks!

Grind/Dose/PreInfusion/Brew/Total Time/Yield

7E/18g/12sec/40sec/52sec/33g

7I/18g/10sec/20sec/30sec/39g

edit: formatting

edit 2: Shout out to u/MyCatsNameIsBernie for this video. Made a shot with this approach and it's already helping me dial in better. Lock in each variable individually: Dose > Yield > Time.

1 year, 7 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on espresso.
Feb. 6, 2018

I have a cheap AWS scale and it works fine for me.

Measuring cups promote fatness. Scales only! [R]

1 year, 7 months agoJan. 31, 2018

[deleted]

1 year, 7 months agoAmericahWest posted comment on 1200isjerky.
Feb. 4, 2018

I love mine. Can be tossed in a bag, it comes with a lid that is kinda loose, so adding a rubber band would make it perfect.

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapa_442DAbCK5K4WV

Advice on making better coffee with what I have plus a reasonable budget for equipment, say $50 to $200 ish range. [R]

1 year, 7 months agoHere-I-Am posted submission on Coffee.
Feb. 2, 2018

Hi /r/coffee! Over the years I have developed a taste for better and better coffee. I started out with some crappy standard brew-a-pot and pre-ground Folgers that I bought in bulk when on sale. What's oxidation? Beans go stale? I know nothing of these things, now go away while I drink my dirt water and know no better. Hmm, out of coffee but I've only used that soggy pile of yesterday's ground coffee for one pot, it can make another surely.

Then my dad bought me a french press, a kettle, a (blade) grinder and a 2lb bag of 'premium' whole beans from a local supermarket. DEAR SCIENCE! says I. I have been drinking dirt! This is far superior!

I gradually learn a bit more about better coffee and after a coffee drinking experience that made me look skeptically at my generous host (was at a Pagan event with some awesome friends)... you want me to try the coffee black first? I'm not really a black coffee drinker but to be polite I will give it a sip. Huh, I don't recognize that bag of beans, wow you have a really elaborate setup to make a cup of coffee, I didn't mean to put you through all that trou.... (smells from cup) ung... (sips from cup)... (stares in wide-eyed stupefaction). How is this coffee?? I thought I had been drinking coffee before... What have I been doing wrong all this time?

And now to where I am currently: I backed off trying for the cup of ambrosia after he told me the cost of his setup, but I did change over to better (in comparison to other supermarket coffee) beans from Trader Joe's.

So, this is my current setup: I have this French Press, an electric blade grinder, an electric kettle and generally use one of thesetwo beans from Trader Joe's. Oh, and I don't currently have/use a scale to measure out the grinds, so that is perhaps something to do. I've read about timing the brew time and have not done anything with that yet either.

I've been reading that the grind quality and size can make a big difference but am somewhat skeptical about how much difference that can make. Still, I remember drinking vastly better coffee.

What can I do/buy to improve my coffee experience from where I am now? With the price range I am currently willing to spend, what things will make the biggest difference?

1 year, 7 months agoHere-I-Am posted comment on Coffee.
Feb. 3, 2018

Here is a good pocket scale to consider adding to your setup, so you can control your ratio. This is important, as you will learn what works for your taste. Different beans have different densities, but a gram is always a gram.

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_l-CDAb1C1HHT0

/r/Ultralight Discussion Thread - Week of January 29, 2018 [R]

1 year, 7 months agoxscottkx posted submission on Ultralight.
Jan. 29, 2018

Please use this thread to discuss recent purchases, trips, or questions for the community at large.

1 year, 7 months agoxscottkx posted comment on Ultralight.
Jan. 30, 2018

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_ShnCAbBZY0JNJ

Totally lost with how to dial-in my grinder and shots despite lots of research. Halp! [Test table included] [R]

1 year, 7 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 26, 2018

I have some new gear and have been reading/watching lots of tutorials on how to dial things in, but am getting horribly confused on some key points. Hoping the community here can set me straight on the best approach for my needs.

Setup:

  • Baratza Sette 270 which I single dose into
  • Rancilio Silvia
  • Beans started w/ a bag of Chromatic Gamut that was ~5weeks old, and now using a blend from a local roastery that was roasted on the 14th
  • Kitchen scale (just gives whole grams, not decimals)
  • Rattleware Shot Pitcher (arriving in a week or two)
  • Espro tamp with the pressure click

My Sette is brand new, and I went through a couple bags of old beans to break in the burrs a bit. Now I'm at around the 7g setting, and I can actually drink the shots, but my palette still isn't trained and I am lost on where to go.

I'm a data nerd, so I've started logging everything. I'm not sure if I'm measuring/logging everything correctly, and I'm a bit lost on figuring out which variables to adjust and in what order.

Here's my data thus far:

Roast DateGrind DateAge (weeks)Bean Input (g)Grind TimeSettingOutput (g)Dose (g)TampBrew TimeOutput (g)In/Out RatioRating (1-5)Comments
11/16/171/24/189.9N/A5:005e1415Light:30Choked--Choked the machine
11/16/171/24/189.9N/A5:009e1615Light:304632.6%2Ok looking crema, bitter flavor likely due to age of beans
11/16/171/25/1810.0N/A5:008e1515Medium:304235.7%2Sour
12/19/171/25/185.316Single Dose6e1616Medium:305320.0%1sour
12/19/171/25/185.316Single Dose7e1615Medium:302171.4%2no crema, a little sour
12/19/171/25/185.316Single Dose7i1715Medium:304930.6%3decent crema, a little sour, drinkable straight and an ok cappuccino
12/19/171/26/185.416Single Dose7g1615Medium:303839.5%3decent crema, a little sour, drinkable straight but not as good as the previous one
1/14/181/26/181.716Single Dose7g1616Medium:304139.0%3A little sour, but an ok finish, drinkable

A few notes:

  • "Medium" tamp is me pushing until the tamp clicks
  • I may be measuring brew time wrong. I time it from when I flip the brew switch on. There's roughly :05 of it making noise before espresso hits the cup.
  • I lack a container with measuring lines, so I've been doing it by weight vs. volume. I think that last shot was close to 2oz based on some other measurements I did.

So that's all the info. Things I'm unsure of:

  • Am I measuring correctly? Should I instead be calibrating based on a fixed shot volume target of 2oz if my end goal is making a nice cappuccino with appropriate ratios? Right now I've just been targeting a 1:2 gram ratio.

  • Should I be timing from when the first drop hits? Or when I flip the switch on?

  • What ratio should I be shooting for and how do I go about deciding which variables to tweak beyond grind setting? It seems if I dial-in targeting a 2oz volume with a 1:2 ratio, that gets me a more accurate cappuccino, but targeting a 1:2 ratio just with the in/out weights without a fixed volume target seems to be getting me less than 2oz.

  • I might be dumb, but I'm having trouble distinguishing between sour and bitter flavor. I can definitely see the pour blonding towards the end, but I'm not clear on what that does to flavor and mouth feel.

I realize this is a massive post, but I'd rather get all the info on the table and let people tell me where I'm going wrong than make assumptions since I'm a novice who is probably over-thinking this. It just isn't clicking for me in terms of where and when to make adjustments. Is this at all similar to how photography has the "exposure triangle?" Happy to answer any follow-ups.

1 year, 7 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
Jan. 27, 2018

I have this scale. It is thin, cheap, and has resolution of 0.1g.

I found this video helpful in learning how to dial in. It basically says to fix the dose (by weight), experiment with yield (again by weight) for best results, then very the grind (and therefore the extraction time) for the very best results.

Edit: fixed video link.

Best espresso machines around the $500 mark? [R]

1 year, 8 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 12, 2018

For the past couple years I've been drinking espresso at friends and starbucks ever since my shitty machine "keurig revo" broke. (mostly Americano's, Flat Whites on occasion and straight espresso when im feeling i NEED it). Im sick of spending so much money at starbucks for espresso when it seems like its too hard for them to make a consistant americano. I have been eyeing the "Breville BES870XL" but im finding reading reviews thats there are service issues and parts are hard to service. Just looking for some opinions/suggestions from you guys.. Looking for a machine at a reasonable price.. Thanks alot

1 year, 8 months agoMyCatsNameIsBernie posted comment on Coffee.
Jan. 12, 2018

I got my BES870XL a little over a month ago. I am happy with it, but if I were going to do it again, I would get the Infuser (BES840XL) with a better grinder. If your budget can accommodate it, I would advise you do the same.

The grinder on the BES870XL isn't terrible, and I am getting consistent results with it. My issue with the grinder is that changing the grind size by one increment can change the extraction time by 10 seconds. I would prefer to have a grinder with finer gradations.

Regardless of what machine you choose, get a scale. I got the AWS scale from Amazon. It makes the dialing-in process so much easier.

I want to buy my first scale. [R]

1 year, 8 months agoa_vinny_01 posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 27, 2017

I really don't know which one to choose, I thought about one from Hario but the reviews are not great, which scale is worth its price and is below $150?

1 year, 8 months agoa_vinny_01 posted comment on Coffee.
Dec. 27, 2017

I’ve used this for 2 years, paid $17:

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_z-grAbMW38MGK

I also use it to weigh gunpowder charges. Gotta get my money’s worth.

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 15, 2017

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily, the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
Dec. 16, 2017

With a timer, I don't really have a good suggestion. I originally went with the hario scale, but it was slow and not very responsive, and ate batteries. I switched to an AWS https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2 and it's great with batteries, responsive. Starting to drift a little now, though...

Yet another newbie recommendation request [R]

1 year, 9 months agoi_think_im_thinking posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 12, 2017

I love the smell of coffee grounds. I do not love the taste of most of the cups of drip/Keurig coffee I've had. I'm wondering if this is entirely a product of cheap coffee and poor brewing method.

First I ask, is it possible to make coffee that tastes as good as it smells, without masking it behind cream and sugar? If the answer is yes, then hooray! I have $200 to spend on a brewing apparatus, burr grinder, fresh roasted beans, gooseneck kettle, you name it.

Anyways I don't have nearly the palate for this stuff yet, so here's some things to help gauge what I like/don't like.

  • Light roast coffee tastes better than dark roast
  • I like it more watery than oily if that makes sense
  • I like sweet over bitter but I don't want to add sugar/creamer if possible
  • Out of different types of tea, I like black tea the best by far

I have researched this stuff at least 4 separate occasions (I like your wiki) and I'd always get enthralled in the Aeropress and the Chemex, which are like opposite ends of the spectrum of manual brewing. However instead of pretending to know anything and asking for help deciding between those I'll just ask the basic question of what are some good options that answer the question above?

Thanks for reading, I know the beginner's guide says to get a French press but there's concerns with the oily-ness of it, and at the same time I'm not going to pretend that I know anything beyond some key terms.

1 year, 9 months agoi_think_im_thinking posted comment on Coffee.
Dec. 12, 2017

$20 scale (I'll second the one here: https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2)

$30 Aeropress

$20 manual burr grinder (bad consistency on large grinds, ok for finer grind, i.e. Aeropress)

$30 kettle or percolator

$100 for beans. Try lots of different kinds. You could start out with a sampler kit that several places offer.

Really just hate it all? Well, now you only have $100 in equipment instead of $200.

Edit: I recommended Aeropress for its versatility and forgiveness. It generally requires less technique and has potential for better consistency. Second place would be a V60, which could save you even more money.

Further edit: To get at your original question, yes it is. For me. Whether coffee will ever taste as good as it smells for you, I can't tell. I'd recommended light roast coffees from Central America based on what you've described.

Yet another newbie recommendation request [R]

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 12, 2017

I love the smell of coffee grounds. I do not love the taste of most of the cups of drip/Keurig coffee I've had. I'm wondering if this is entirely a product of cheap coffee and poor brewing method.

First I ask, is it possible to make coffee that tastes as good as it smells, without masking it behind cream and sugar? If the answer is yes, then hooray! I have $200 to spend on a brewing apparatus, burr grinder, fresh roasted beans, gooseneck kettle, you name it.

Anyways I don't have nearly the palate for this stuff yet, so here's some things to help gauge what I like/don't like.

  • Light roast coffee tastes better than dark roast
  • I like it more watery than oily if that makes sense
  • I like sweet over bitter but I don't want to add sugar/creamer if possible
  • Out of different types of tea, I like black tea the best by far

I have researched this stuff at least 4 separate occasions (I like your wiki) and I'd always get enthralled in the Aeropress and the Chemex, which are like opposite ends of the spectrum of manual brewing. However instead of pretending to know anything and asking for help deciding between those I'll just ask the basic question of what are some good options that answer the question above?

Thanks for reading, I know the beginner's guide says to get a French press but there's concerns with the oily-ness of it, and at the same time I'm not going to pretend that I know anything beyond some key terms.

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
Dec. 12, 2017

$200 budget

Leaving $160 for brewer, hot water, and grinder An Aeropress is $30-35, and you don't need anything but a liquid measuring glass and a microwave, or basically something you can heat in the microwave/on the stove and pour somewhat easily with, leaving $125 for the grinder. I'd go with AerGrind for the best possible grind for your budget (any other grinder will be most/all of your budget). AerGrind is $115 + shipping from www.primacoffee.com (there might be a $15 off coupon right now too)

Or you could go with a V60 (plastic) + filters for $15, get an inexpensive gooseneck kettle for $35 (Hario Buono), and maybe stretch your budget a few dollars for the AerGrind.

Chemex is unfortunately prohibitively expensive since you have to spend like $45 and need a kettle still. It would suck to get a worse grinder just to get a Chemex first, so I'd save that for later. Maybe buy Chemex filters instead of V60 filters if you really want.

Out of these options, I like the AeroPress option the best. It doesn't make a huge cup, but it's great for learning the basics, and then when you can spare another $50 to get a kettle + pour over you'll have an idea what you're doing before you add pouring as a variable.

what's your favorite gram scale ? [R]

1 year, 9 months agoxscottkx posted submission on Ultralight.
Dec. 5, 2017
1 year, 9 months agoxscottkx posted comment on Ultralight.
Dec. 5, 2017

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_070jAbXRNQ9RF

Thoughts on these scales? [R]

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 29, 2017

Anyone know about the below two options as a scale for v60?

https://www.amazon.com/Precision-Sensors-display-Battery-Included/dp/B073RZJJKB/ref=sr_1_2?ie=UTF8&qid=1512006673&sr=8-2&keywords=hostweigh+scale

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B071J3YXFH/ref=sspa_dk_detail_0?psc=1

I'm considering these since it has a timer on top of the scale and I didn't want to do the Hario because I keep hearing about the fact that it's slow to register the weight and because it's highly susceptible to break down if any water gets on it. Thoughts? Maybe push me back to hario?

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
Nov. 29, 2017

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

This is the scale I have. Very responsive. Accurate. I just make sure to use a coaster or something as a heat pad. Doesn't eat up batteries. I'm very happy with it, despite the simple feature set (no timer, doesn't come with a calibration weight).

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 24, 2017

I hope everyone in the US had a nice Thanksgiving!

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily, the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
Nov. 25, 2017

For the grinder, I'd look into hand grinder options if you're really only making 1-2 cups at a time and for yourself. AerGrind, FeldGrind, Lido, Helor, Kinu. Most of these can be found on Prima Coffee and they have a guide comparing them. This guide does not have the AerGrind, which is essentially a smaller FeldGrind and is new to the market. I recommend hand grinders simply because they will be a higher quality grind at a lower price point ($100-300 instead of $500-600 for the comparable electric grinders). But you can get a good electric grinder at $129+, just won't have the same grind quality as the hand grinders at the same price point.

The grinder will be your most expensive purchase, then the kettle. Prima also has a comparison guide for those and has a good selection of them available. But my recommendation would be to go with the Bonavita Variable Temp Gooseneck or Stagg EKG. Electric, variable temp, gooseneck kettles are very convenient and quick, and those two have good pouring ability.

For a scale I'd just recommend [this one for $20.] (https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2) It's accurate and has quick response. It's really all you need unless you want to get fancy with an Acaia Scale ($140-220).

I'd probably go with a Feldgrind, Lido or Helor for $175-250. The Stagg EKG is $150 but 15% off if you act right now (on Fellow's website). You'll be getting really nice equipment and still be staying under or around your budget after shipping.

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 24, 2017

I hope everyone in the US had a nice Thanksgiving!

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily, the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

1 year, 9 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
Nov. 24, 2017

A scale will make it easier in my opinion. No guesswork that way. If you just go by volume/eye/using the scoop, the strength of the coffee will vary based on different types of beans and roasts. Plus one of the best ones I've used is $20 on Amazon. But if you really don't wanna use one, your life won't be ruined, you'll just maybe need to do a little more work to find a good recipe when you get a new bean.

As far as a grinder, what's your budget for one (after buying the AeroPress and maybe a scale)? I just don't wanna recommend anything way off your budget.

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

1 year, 10 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 3, 2017

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily, the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

1 year, 10 months agoMikeTheBlueCow posted comment on Coffee.
Nov. 6, 2017

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2

Home Espresso Machine + Grinder Recommendations [R]

1 year, 10 months agoLuckyBahamut posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2017

After spending far too much money on lattes from coffee shops over the years, I am finally wanting to invest in an espresso machine and a grinder. I have looked for hours and read several posts on /r/coffee about it, but there never seems to be a consensus (maybe that is just the nature of the question). What would all you recommend for a good combo? My price range is $500-$1500. Is there a main set/brand/combo that people frequently buy in this price range, or are the options really as varied as they seem?

Also, would any machine+grinder under $1500 be capable of making a latte as good as Starbucks, Dutch Brothers, etc., and if not, what exactly would the latte taste similar to? Sorry if these are stupid questions, but I would love answers from a community like this.

Thank you so much.

EDIT: This sub is so awesome. 3 answers already. I'm ecstatic!

1 year, 10 months agoLuckyBahamut posted comment on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2017

At the low end of your budget: Gaggia Classic ($380) + Baratza Virtuoso ($230) = $510.

A general rule on thumb is that the quality of your grinder is more important than that of your espresso machine. With your budget, you ought to allocate half to a grinder, and the other half on the espresso machine and accessories*.

If you stick with the Gaggia, you could get an even better grinder than the Virtuoso like the Sette ($380) or Vario ($480) and still stay under $1000.

Paying more for an espresso machine (e.g. Crossland CC1, Rancilio Rocky, ECM Casa V) will net you higher build and component quality (and better temperature stability for the CC1 and a PID-retrofitted Rocky).

* The main accessories you'll also need:

The quality of drinks you can get outta these machines will exceed that of what you can expect from Starbucks. HOWEVER, it's not as easy as pushing a couple buttons. There's a learning curve involved in terms of pulling a quality espresso shot and steaming good milk. YouTube is your best friend.

Looking for scale recommendations. [R]

2 years agoSept. 9, 2017

[deleted]

2 years agohammong posted on Silverbugs.
Sept. 10, 2017

I'm going to assume you already have a smaller scale with a high resolution (say 0.01g or 0.001g) for small items. A scale that will weigh kilo items is usually going to have 1g or 0.1g resolution and no better.

This brand is my go-to for cheap scales - this particular one has a weight capacity of 2kg and resolution of 0.1g

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=s9acsdsimhhdbwbjuwvbcxw?pfrdm=ATVPDKIKX0DER&pfrds=merchandised-search-4&pfrdr=VH67V0E8RS2K0BGBRZ6F&pfrdt=101&pfrdp=9d24518a-e817-5b28-92dd-ef38520d4d25&pfrdi=678508011

Noob here. I would like to get me some French Press, what do you recommend for a grinder and a scale? [R]

2 years agoMikeTheBlueCow posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 25, 2017

Only thing I know is that grinders have different levels of grinds, some levels are better for V60s and some for Chemex and so on .. so what is a good grinder that would give me options for grinds? mostly i'll use it for the French Press, but I do also have a V60. As for a scale, is it necessary?

2 years agoMikeTheBlueCow posted on Coffee.
Aug. 25, 2017

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2

I just got this and have been using it for the past couple weeks. I used to have a Hario scale. This one is much more responsive and sensitive. It's half the price. It doesn't have a timer like the Hario does but I just use my phone or a kitchen timer anyways.

Has anyone bought this scale to weigh beans? [R]

2 years, 1 month agoAug. 13, 2017

[deleted]

2 years, 1 month agodeemuhn posted on Coffee.
Aug. 13, 2017

The scale is fine, however I would recommend one with a larger capacity.

Something like this American Weigh 2kg will let you fit most brewing vessels on them with no trouble, and it's a workhorse. I've had mine for more than five years no problem.

Edit: Just noticed you specifically said shots. Oops. I'll leave this here for anybody else though.

I need a recommendation for good scale for weighing the coffee and water in my french press. [R]

2 years, 1 month agoNanoChemist posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 5, 2017

Title says it all... Thank you!

2 years, 1 month agoNanoChemist posted on Coffee.
Aug. 5, 2017

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG

This scale has 2kg capacity with 0.1g resolution.

I'm 420 years old with $69 trillion in my town paints murals of the US Army - October 24, 1943 [2940x2355] [R]

2 years, 1 month agocoffee_SS posted submission on SubredditSimulator.
Aug. 4, 2017
2 years, 1 month agocoffee_SS posted on SubredditSimulator.
Aug. 4, 2017

Followed your advise and this is what I was thinking, and it makes better coffee than the v60. At least the decaf from the same place as the steam thermometer on the group head after a shot.

Help buying a kitchen scale [R]

2 years, 1 month agoWiggleWeed posted submission on Cooking.
July 27, 2017

So, I love ramen. I've been making a lot of different broths, but until recently, I've just been buying dried noodles. My amazing wife bought me a noodle maker, and most recipes I've found for making noodles are very specific about the hydration of the noodles, using specific measurements, typically in grams, for different consistency of noodles.

I've never bought or used a kitchen scale before. Can anyone point me in the direction of one that will be well suited for my needs? I don't want the cheapest piece of junk amazon has to offer, but I also don't want to buy something insanely expensive that's going to be overkill. Any recommendations?

2 years, 1 month agoWiggleWeed posted on Cooking.
July 28, 2017

I bought this one years ago - it's perfect. It also comes with two flat bottom ingredient bowls which store with the scale so it's compact as well. Highly recommend.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=ohauidetailpageo00s00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

University coffee setup [R]

2 years, 1 month agoFelixiium posted submission on Coffee.
July 22, 2017

I'm a light drinker(1-2 cups a day usually, 3 cups is the limit for me), and I need to buy coffee equipment for my dorm, as getting a Starbucks cappuccino daily is too expensive. My budget is 100$. Do you have recommendations?

2 years, 1 month agoFelixiium posted on Coffee.
July 22, 2017

A pour-over setup works best with a kettle, unless you have really fine motor control skills*, so like others said, a Hario hand grinder (~$30), a scale ($~20), and a Clever Coffee Dripper or an Aeropress. A clever is like a French press in that you put ground coffee in, wait a few minutes, but it's also like a pour-over in that once you put it on top of a cup, the valve at the bottom opens and everything goes through the paper filter. Incredibly forgiving. Have a look Aeropress is fine too, since you only drink 1-2 cups.

For the scale, I use this AWS 2kg - compact and updates fast. Survived a couple explosions of water and coffee as well.

*I've seen a pianist pour a thinner stream of water than what comes out of a $100+ Takahiro kettle using just a ordinary tea kettle with a huge spout.

Which food scale do you use? [R]

2 years, 3 months agoyellow_circle posted submission on loseit.
June 1, 2017

I want to portion out snacks for vacation and actually I've just really been needing a food scale since beginning my journey. Which one do you recommend? I'd prefer under $25 and included with Amazon Prime shipping. Thanks all!

2 years, 3 months agoyellow_circle posted on loseit.
June 1, 2017

I use this.

The scale is technically my boyfriend's. He got it when he wanted to improve his espresso-making skills hahahaha. I like how it rounds to the nearest 0.1g even though the max it can take is only 2kg. It doesn't measure well if the weight is under 1g, but definitely on the more precise side of things!

Thinking about getting a Chemex [R]

2 years, 3 months agoCwardw posted submission on Coffee.
May 25, 2017

Hey guys, I have been considering getting a chemex for a little while now, and I have some questions. Going through this sub Reddit has taught me that if I'm going to get a chemex, it's in my best interest to buy a grinder, a scale, and a gooseneck kettle. The main problem I have is that I don't want to spend a ton of money. What would you guys recommend?

2 years, 3 months agoCwardw posted on Coffee.
May 27, 2017

Probably the lowest price for all those:

good, cheap scale:

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr13?ie=UTF8&qid=1495899791&sr=8-3&keywords=american+weigh+scale

Gooseneck w/ thermometer:

https://www.amazon.com/CASALEEYA-Stainless-Gooseneck-Thermometer-Disposable/dp/B01HZG92AA/ref=sr11?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1495899850&sr=1-1-spons&keywords=gooseneck+kettle&psc=1

grinder:

https://www.amazon.com/Cuisinart-DBM-8-Supreme-Grind-Automatic/dp/B00018RRRK/ref=sr18?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1495899916&sr=1-8&keywords=hario+grinder

Just tried using a French press for the first time. I have a stupid question. [R]

2 years, 3 months agojamievlong posted submission on Coffee.
May 25, 2017

So the instructions say to put in two tablespoons of coarsely ground coffee per every 6oz cup of coffee in the pot. It then says to cover the grinds with hot water until it reaches "near the top" of the pot.

My french press holds 1000ml.

That translates to about 34oz.

Does that mean I need to put in 11 tablespoons of grinds?

Or can I choose to just make one 6oz cup of coffee and put in 2 tablespoons? Wouldn't that make for one very weak cup of coffee with all that water?

I apologize for what is no doubt a very stupid misreading of the instructions.

Thanks for your help. Don't mock me too much.

2 years, 3 months agojamievlong posted on Coffee.
May 25, 2017

Get this scale: https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr15?ie=UTF8&qid=1495752221&sr=8-5&keywords=American+weigh+scale

Not only does this make it WAY easier when you're trying to figure out how much water to add to coffee, its also accurate.

Easy + Accurate = Yay.

Couple of things:

  1. Tablespoon to oz is really an outdated and not that accurate way to measure out your coffee and water and if you want to be consistent and really figure how you like your coffee to taste, a scale is your best option.

  2. This means you can making as many cups or as little cups of coffee as you like regardless of how many ounces your French Press is. You no longer have to eyeball how much water you add or fill it up to the top.

If you end up getting a scale, its easy. Use a brew ratio like 1:15(1 gram of coffee to 15 grams of water). So for about a cup, use 20:300. If you want to make 2 cups, double it(40:600). If you want to make 3 cups, triple it(60:900).

Also, check out this video on brewing a French Press: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EQqpAyh16R4

I hope this helps!

How Many 7g/0.25oz. Scoops of Ground Coffee Should I Be Putting in my 34oz. French Press? [R]

2 years, 3 months agouggghhhggghhh posted submission on Coffee.
May 23, 2017

I usually put 4-5 scoops for a full brew. Some people say I put too much and others say not enough. I'm using medium roast coffee right now. Would be so much easier if everything was just measured in Cups and Tsps or Tbps.

2 years, 3 months agouggghhhggghhh posted on Coffee.
May 23, 2017

Ditto everyone else on the scale. Volume is a completely unreliable way to measure coffee. Any digital scale with at least .1 gram accuracy and a tare function will do. I got this one for less that $20 on Amazon. https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr14?ie=UTF8&qid=1495556703&sr=8-4&keywords=american+weigh+scale

That said, if you're not wanting to spend extra money and go down the rabbit hole trying to brew the perfect cup, then just experiment with the number of scoops until you get something that tastes good to you. That's all that really matters anyway, right?

In the market for a new scale, what would you gram counters recommend? [R]

2 years, 5 months agoxscottkx posted submission on Ultralight.
April 1, 2017

I'll admit I'm new to this, ultralight business, and it makes sense now that I think about it. I've read some posts, and realized that a good scale is a good place to start, but would like some further insights. thanks.

2 years, 5 months agoxscottkx posted on Ultralight.
April 1, 2017

I use this: American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_uq83ybR7R9NZJ

Also, any cheap luggage scale will work for when you have your whole pack packed up and wanna know the total weight.

Just bought Breville Dual Boiler and BSP grinder [R]

2 years, 5 months agotooth-ache posted submission on Coffee.
March 20, 2017

Hello. I'm very happy to report that my Breville Barista Express decided to start mildly leak water into the magnetic tool tray (how who own one know what I mean). Luckily the BBB has outstanding return policy so I took advantage of the policy and returned the machine for the exchange of the dual boiler and the smart pro grinder. Im well aware the love/hate relationship towards the breville grinder on his sub. The BBB is the only company that has unconditional return policy and the BSP is the best they carry.

Anyways, given the limitations of the Barista Express machine, which I had for over a year, I've only messed with the grind size and grind time, and of course beans from various roasters. Now, the Dual Boiler has more features that seem to be easier to access. I see some people use scales to measure shot weight, change temperature and play with volume and pull time, which sounds great, yet messing with these settings would exponentially add layers of complexity. I don't mind taking it to the next level, I just don't know where to start. And should I even mess with this at all? Are the manufacturer's presets good enough to pull a 95 percentile shot as long as the grind size and grind wight put the extraction pressure gauge where it belongs?

Another question I have is if I should get a better tamper and change the steam wand tip?

Last question. I spoke with the Breville tech support before taking the unit back to store. The tech acted very surprised after I told her that I descale the unit every two weeks. We pull 3-4 double shots every day and having fairly hard water I thought the more frequent descaling would benefit the machine. Not according to the tech support. So what's the best frequency? The manual appeared to be very general. I also see some people recommend back flushing more frequently rather than waiting for the service light to come on.

Edit: I would like to thank all of you guys for the time you all took educating the stranger. I followed he advice and bought a scale. You are a wonderful community. Hopefully one day I will be able to contribute to the coffee sub as well.

Cheese!

2 years, 5 months agotooth-ache posted on Coffee.
March 21, 2017

Followed your advise and this is what I got. Can't wait to step up shots.

When should I start messing with the extraction temperature?

/r/Ultralight Discussion Thread - Week of March 20, 2017 [R]

2 years, 6 months agoxscottkx posted submission on Ultralight.
March 20, 2017

Please use this thread to discuss recent purchases, trips, or questions for the community at large.

2 years, 5 months agoxscottkx posted on Ultralight.
March 21, 2017

this for individual items:https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr14?ie=UTF8&qid=1490115027&sr=8-4&keywords=american+weigh+scale

this for full pack once food and all that jazz is added: https://www.amazon.com/Luggage-Temperature-Function-Backlight-Traveler/dp/B00A8SXGKA/ref=sr15?ie=UTF8&qid=1490115067&sr=8-5&keywords=luggage+scale

Like /s-4711, put a mixing bowl on the smaller scale then tare it to weigh larger items.

Homemade Preworkout Questions [R]

2 years, 6 months agowiiittttt posted submission on Fitness.
March 13, 2017

Those of you with experience making your own preworkout, I have a few questions for you. I lift 4-5x/week, and would like to start making my own preworkout so I can control what goes in it, save money, and be able to customize the amounts of certain ingredients. I read through a bunch of the previous posts, and based on research there and on examine.com, I tentatively decided on the following.

I plan to include:

  • Creatine (3-5g)
  • Beta-Alanine (1-2g)
  • Citrulline-Malate (3-4g)
  • + Caffeine pill (100-200mg)

My questions are:

1) It looks like I'll need a scale accurate to at least 0.1g - do you have one that you like? Where did you get it? Anything in particular I should look for besides required accuracy and good reviews?

2) What do you use for flavoring that adds the fewest calories? I've heard Gatorade/Crystal Light/Kool-aid powder, mio/other flavoring drops, etc. Any that you find exceptionally good at masking bad taste?

3) Do you ever take preworkout for anything besides lifting? How do you alter it for a more cardio/endurance-focused activity such as BJJ?

4) Anything you would add/subtract/adjust as far as the ingredients and amounts go? (I'm F/5'8"/119 if that helps - I'd rather start out with a dose that's too low and increase later, so I just went with the low end of the "recommended" daily dose).

2 years, 6 months agowiiittttt posted on Fitness.
March 13, 2017

Scale foe Chemex? [R]

2 years, 6 months agoMeitachi posted submission on Coffee.
March 2, 2017

Hello coffee lovers! Just ordered a Lido 3 and couldn't be more excited. I home roast and use a Chemex for pour over. Looking at the Hario pour over scale; good call? Maybe I'm over thinking this....

2 years, 6 months agoMeitachi posted on Coffee.
March 2, 2017

American Weight Scale

I bought this based on the recommendations in the coffee wiki and actually own 2 due to its relatively low cost and east of use. Fits both a Chemex and French Press perfectly.

[Technique] Is there a guaranteed French Press technique that'll consistently give me the flavor I desire? [R]

2 years, 7 months agoFeb. 1, 2017

[deleted]

2 years, 7 months agojamievlong posted on Coffee.
Feb. 1, 2017

If you want to be consistent, FIRST step is a scale.

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

Great starter scale. I also still use it for my espresso machine when pulling shots.

Get away from using tablespoons and ounces. It doesn't matter how perfect your brew technique is if your recipe( coffee and water) is constantly different every cup of coffee you make(and trust me, it is even if you don't think so). If you happen to make a great cup of coffee one day and want to keep replicating it, there is no you're going to do it exactly the next time. Even if you eyeball it. Also, if you happen to make a bad cup of coffee, you're going to want to know what went wrong. Without a scale, you won't know how much/how little and what to adjust.

For example: if you have a scale and you want to use a recipe for about a single cup of coffee -using a 1:15 repcipe - 20g coffee:300g water is fine. When the time is up and you pour yourself a cup of coffee, you notice that you want the cup of coffee a little "bolder" in taste. So one thing you can do is up the coffee dosage to 21g, or lower the water to 290g. Once you lock in a recipe that tastes perfect to you, you'll be able be able to make it every time. Since you're using a french press, one variable you don't want to adjust is grind size. You want a coarse grind size so that your grounds dont go through the screen.

I know you posted what YOU do when you brew with a French Press, but I suggest watching this instructional from a professional on how to brew with one. Why not learn the proper way instead of continuing to guess? You're not far off, but this will forsure help!

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oivsCyJv7nw

I don't want this to come off as me being a jerk. I truly want you to make a great cup of coffee from one guy to another. I would just hate to see you put in all this effort and then not get the results you're looking for.

I hope this helps!

Scale Help [R]

2 years, 8 months agoijhecker posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 4, 2017

Basically I just need a good, small scale that will work properly and not break easily, the cheaper the better. I considered buying this scale from stumptown's website but i'm curious if i can find a cheaper option that has the same quality on amazon or from a different website

2 years, 8 months agoijhecker posted on Coffee.
Jan. 4, 2017

This is the scale I started with. It's super compact, really responsive, and affordable. American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_gftByb941Q4DF

Which scale should I get? [R]

2 years, 9 months agoRobLong321 posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 17, 2016

A few are on sale on Amazon that I'm considering. Anyone have input on these?

Guess what matters most is the speed/responsiveness. For weighing during pourovers, I'm thinking the flat tablet design is better and more stable than the raised platform design?

2 years, 9 months agoRobLong321 posted on Coffee.
Dec. 17, 2016

I recommend an AWS scale. I've had mine for several years and it still works great.

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

2 years, 9 months agobbrooking posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 7, 2016

I jumped too quick in buying an Oxo burr grinder, which is okay for drip grind (my only need at the moment—and I also have a Lido 3 for more demanding grinds), but as has been mentioned by others here, the scale is not particularly accurate or consistent. So . . . I'm thinking of adding a free-standing quality scale to my coffee bar. Would appreciate any suggestions of scales to consider based on your experience.

2 years, 9 months agobbrooking posted on Coffee.
Dec. 7, 2016

I've used a AWS SC-2KG for many years. It's 0.1g precision and has always been spot on when I've used a calibration weight on it. They're cheap and I've seen a number of cafes using them.

[Gear] Here is my prospective Chemex setup [R]

2 years, 9 months agogartonio posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 24, 2016
2 years, 9 months agogartonio posted on Coffee.
Nov. 24, 2016

I'd prioritize a scale over thermometer or bean vault, not that it's bad that you're getting those things. Many will tell you water just off boil is fine, but I think it's worth being able to experiment with water temperature to decide that for yourself. EDIT: oh and if you end up anything like me when I started going down this rabbit hole, you may find yourself itching for a better grinder (e.g. Baratza Encore) sooner than later. Just something to consider. Upgradeitis is a real thing.

Platform or pocket scale recommendations? Prefer .01g ability, AC adapter vs batteries a huge plus. [R]

2 years, 9 months agocoolguy-FqEZKjFqPGwM posted submission on trees.
Nov. 22, 2016

What's up ents?

Hope everyone is blazing along nicely in prep for Thanksgiving munchies. So here's the deal. I have been using the same digital pocket scale for probably close to 20 years now. It finally started to shit the bed (probably due to a large keif buildup in and around all of the internal components). I haven't had to buy a scale in so long I'm hoping that you all can recommend something that meets my specific desires.

  • Weighs at least up to 500g+ total
  • Reads down to .01g without much zero float
  • AC adapter vs batteries only
  • Possible to attach bowl or container to platform for quick weighing of larger quantities
  • Does not need to be portable as it will be permanently on my workbench

If any of you all have something like this you'd recommend to others, please let me know. I've been browsing Amazon, but every time I think I found something good I'll come across a load of bad reviews that I don't know if I should trust or not so I'd rather hear from the horse's mouth.

Much appreciated, and have a great day.

2 years, 9 months agocoolguy-FqEZKjFqPGwM posted on trees.
Nov. 22, 2016

Two scales I use nearly daily:

  1. https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2
  2. https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-GEMINI-20-Portable-MilliGram/dp/B0012TDNAM

The first one goes up to 2Kg, but is less precise. The second one only goes up to 20g, but has mg precision.

Both take batteries, but I use rechargable AAAs and the charge lasts for a long time. AWS is a reputable company.

Buying a scale [R]

2 years, 10 months agoturbotrob posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 12, 2016

I'm in the market to pick up a new scale. There seems to be a big price range even in scales with the same advertised accuracy. Is there any advantage to the 'higher end scales' or should I just be picking up a generic $20 scale accurate to 0.1g?

2 years, 10 months agoturbotrob posted on Coffee.
Nov. 12, 2016

I've used a ton of scales and this one has never let me down.

https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

[Question] Making Coffee via Cheap Coffee Maker at Work [R]

2 years, 10 months agoadi4 posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 4, 2016

Quick background

My company is a tenant of a building. The building has a business model Keurig, which is great for a quick cup of crappy "coffee". That's run it's course on me, plus I don't think it's ever been cleaned or serviced. I decided to buy just a cheap coffee maker that my cube mate and I could make coffee with. Here us what I went with, based on a Sweethome article for best cheap coffee maker.

The Question

So we've been buying your standard bags of ground coffee, nothing fancy. The coffee to water ratio is all over the place as far as brewing directions. Usually it's in ounces, which doesn't help me when I'm at work. Is there a quick and dirty way to figure out how much water and grounds I should be making? Usually when I make it, it seems to weak or just overly bitter. I figure we both drink maybe 2-3 of your standard cups (mugs) of coffee. I typically fill the water line up to 8 on the reservoir. Also I'm using this scoop

Help?

2 years, 10 months agoadi4 posted on Coffee.
Nov. 4, 2016

Typically, I go with just around 16-17g per 8 oz (or around 250 ml). Do yourself a favor and get one of these. Use it to accurately measure out the amount of coffee you brew, adjust to taste, and stay consistent.

Honestly though, it could be any number of factors that are causing the issues. The main ones are water quality, brew temperature (best at 195-205), freshness of grind, quality of beans, grind size, and water/coffee ratio. Try to play with one factor at a time and see if you can improve the cup quality to an acceptable amount. That machine should be capable of making a pretty decent cup of coffee given the right factors, assuming it maintains a good brewing temp range.

Seeking help [R]

2 years, 10 months agoOD_on_vitamin_D posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2016

Hello coffee people , i joined this subreddit about a month ago and since then i've found nothing but help and great suggestions from you lovely people . Today i come here carrying a new question , i have been using an Aeropress for 27 days now ( yes i remember when i bought my first Aeropress because it was a transition for me ) and its been great for me , i found the mix that suits me , 17 grams of fresh beans with water 45-65 seconds off the boil ( i dont have a thermometer and a scale , yet. ) . The coffee i've been drinking has been simply eyeopening considering that I used to drink very watered down coffee that tastes bland at the best .

My question is that I have been thinking of buying a new item to make my coffee and what i have in mind are the Chemex and the V60 . What would you guys recommend ? What are the pros and cons each ?

2 years, 10 months agoOD_on_vitamin_D posted on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2016

If you move on to pour overs you are certainly going to need a gooseneck kettle. Pourovers rely on a much more controlled and consistent flow of water, that is only possible with a gooseneck. That's why the aeropress is so nice and cheap. You can get away with a big ol kettle and no scale since the device has volume markings.

However, there are a lot of great cheap options for these things. For a scale, get the AWS from Amazon:

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_X.1eybZYHNVQ1

This pourover kettle is prolly the cheapest that isn't a ripoff:

Hario VKB-120HSVV60 Buono Pouring Kettle, 1.2 litre https://www.amazon.com/dp/B000IGOXLS/ref=cmswrcpapi_1b2eybCGS7DTR

And assuming you don't have a grinder, start with either the Porlex Mini or Hario Mini Mill. Both dona fine job.

You will certainly need those items in order to start making pourovers well, but it's really not to much of an up front cost!

Good luck.

Newb to coffee, French press ideas? [R]

2 years, 10 months agoOct. 27, 2016

[deleted]

2 years, 10 months agobetter_half posted on Coffee.
Oct. 27, 2016

Try getting a starter pack! A lot of coffee sites will sell kits that will include some variation of coffee, scale, brewer, kettle, grinder. Prima coffee has this, which seems like a fantastic intro kit. You'd be without a scale or a kettle. Since your budget is $100 total, I'd recommend getting this scale. Small, cheap, reliable. I used it for a long, long time.

Kettles are more difficult. Variable temperature kettles will eat up most of your budget, so you probably will have to do without one (which is okay!). You have the option of getting either an electric or stove-top kettle. I prefer electric; you might prefer otherwise. This is really up to you. You're just looking for something that will boil water. A gooseneck would be nice if either of you decide to keep exploring coffee, but it's not really necessary for a french press. Get something that's easy to pour from. I think these are a pain, while these are pretty easy to use. Again, this is based on what you prefer. This would be a nice, (relatively) cheap stovetop gooseneck, while this would be a nice electric gooseneck kettle. None of those are variable temperature. Personally, I don't think you should worry about a gooseneck kettle or a variable temperature kettle until you know that you're interested in exploring coffee. Focus on getting something that is cheap and reliable. And, hey, it'll make boiling water easier!

The kit above is just a quick example I found. Bodum is probably the most popular french press brand. Hario is another brand to look at. Just find a press that looks nice to you!

Look for something that can hold enough for at least two cups of coffee, so that she can make enough coffee for the both of you.

Here's what I would personally get (Amazon links): Bodum Chambord 34 oz, American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale, Hario Skerton, Proctor Silex K2070YA Electric Kettle.

The total is $113.40. You could save some money by opting for the Hario Mini Mill over the Skerton, but the Skerton's wider base will provide more stability. The kettle is just a cheap electric kettle. You could also save more money by grabbing a different french press. I just think the Chambord looks nice. The 8 cup Brazil would be cheaper.

Hope this helps!

Scale for Espresso? [R]

2 years, 11 months agoOct. 4, 2016

Does anyone know of a good scale that could fit onto a la marzocco 2 group drip tray that isn't a acacia lunar? I'm currently using a pocket sized scale and it works but it's a bit too small so it's a little bit of a hassle to get it positioned correctly with the brew pitcher.

2 years, 11 months agoLuckyBahamut posted on Coffee.
Oct. 4, 2016

You could spend $220+ for a fancy Acaia Lunar, or less than $20 for an American Weigh Scale. I've used this for espresso and Chemex for over 5 years and it's still running fine.

Pour Over Noob [R]

2 years, 12 months agokaralozano posted submission on Coffee.
Sept. 17, 2016

I'm just getting into pour over coffee. I've signed up for a roast subscription service that sends me coffee every week. However, I need some advice in terms of pour over equipment. The coffee maker/hot plate combo just won't do anymore. I have a pretty limited budget at the moment. I'd like to try to stay under $60 total. Any recommendations? I've been trying to read up as much as I can but there seems to be so many pros and cons in terms of Chemex vs Aeropress vs Beehouse etc.

Any help appreciated!

Edit: I do mean pour over, however, it seems the aeropress is quite popular on this sub. I included it as an option. Apologies if it confuses anyone.

Edit2: no i didn't factor in a scale in my budget.

Edit3: Preferably something that doesn't take too long to brew during busy mornings.

2 years, 12 months agokaralozano posted on Coffee.
Sept. 18, 2016

Suggestion for a budget scale: https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswsu_dp

Any Regrets Experienced Coffee Drinkers? [R]

3 years, 1 month agoAug. 13, 2016

Hey all! I've posted here a few times.

As I am 2 months into my coffee adventure, I wanted to make sure I am heading in the right direction.

First I want to see if you had to start all over again what would you do differently?

I also want to know what my next addition or upgrade should be. All of the products I own are: * Bonavita Variable Temp Electric Kettle * Aero press * Ceramic Hario V60 * Gaggia Classic *Scale Measured by every 1G (Going to upgrade to a 0.1G scale) * OE Lido E-T *$20 tamper

What should I look to purchase/upgrade next?

Thanks!

3 years, 1 month agodrun3 posted on Coffee.
Aug. 14, 2016

Answer: no. Get something that reads to the 0.1g and you're good. I got the one that thesweethome.com recommended (https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_UVhSxbS7Y7WHF) and it serves dual purpose for coffee and general kitchen needs

How Is This For Beginner Gear? [R]

3 years, 1 month agoAug. 9, 2016

[deleted]

3 years, 1 month agoTheDonutChef posted on Coffee.
Aug. 9, 2016

Several others pointed out the scale might not be the best choice & I agree. The AWS scale works well for me under my PF for espresso because of its size, & also works just fine for my chemex.

Help with measurements [R]

3 years, 1 month agoSonOfSet posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 4, 2016

I don't have a scale yet and so my aeropress coffee tends to vary a lot. I've tried to guess the measurements so far but I was wondering if maybe someone could help me out by telling me how much water and coffee to use and measure by using a cup or tablespoons.

3 years, 1 month agoSonOfSet posted on Coffee.
Aug. 4, 2016

You'll never be able to get a consistent cup if you don't weigh the coffee out. Each tablespoon weighs differently because the beans aren't physically the same in density and size, which leads to completely different amounts of coffee every single time you make a cup. Unless you use the same coffee every day, and can have a point of reference based on a number you've tested, it'll be near to impossible to guess the weight of the coffee you dose.

A good scale will run you back ~$18 and take you where you want to be. I'd say hop on Amazon and get a pocket scale like this one here: https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?ie=UTF8&qid=1470333818&sr=8-2&keywords=aws+scale

The problem with volumetric dosing is a lack of consistency from no number being placed on the density of coffee present. If you want to get rid of a possible variable, you'll have to put a number on it.

Quality comes from intelligent effort. Sure, you can throw a couple scoops in and be on the way, but you know it can be better so why try to side step? Buy the tool you need to do the job you need done. No need to trip.

noob question..for 600ml of water how many tablespoons of grounds should i use? [R]

3 years, 1 month agod4mini0n posted submission on Coffee.
July 25, 2016

Inb4 someone says to measure in grams and grind your own beans..I have a grinder and I grind my beans. Just don't have a scale yet.

Also I'm making a French press with this FYI.

3 years, 1 month agod4mini0n posted on Coffee.
July 25, 2016

A scale really is important, and cheap. For a long time I used the AWS SC-2kg, which is $16.

Someone did a study here a few months ago, depending on roast level and country of origin coffee can fluctuate in density by over 100%. I've had the 2 Tbsp scoop that comes with the aeropress be anywhere between 8g and 20g of coffee beans.

Good coffee on a budget [R]

3 years, 2 months agoCoffee_and_Yoga posted submission on Coffee.
July 14, 2016

What are recommendations for great tasting coffee that is reasonably priced? Preferably a medium to dark roast.

3 years, 2 months agoCoffee_and_Yoga posted on Coffee.
July 14, 2016

This is a great scale. It is stupidly accurate from what I have used it for. I generally use it for espresso but it could also be used for an aeropress or pour over.

https://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=ohauisearch_detailpage?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Wanting a better cup of coffee [R]

3 years, 2 months agoraffiki77 posted submission on Coffee.
July 13, 2016

Hey all, I've been lurking here the past couple days and I have realized that I've been drinking/brewing mediocre coffee at best. I would love to get some advice on how to start making a decent cup. I normally use a Keurig gasp with my reusable Kcup, which is usually filled with either a light or medium roast bag of Community Coffee (sometimes I splurge and go to this local kitchen store that has flavored coffee beans that they grind for you). My roommate has a French press (one she picked up from Starbucks) that I thought I knew how to use... After reading some threads I have realized I have no idea how to use it! I feel like as a side note I should add that I live in Natchitoches, Louisiana, if that helps you recommend places to buy good coffee. I am also in college, so things that aren't too pricey are great!

Thanks guys!

3 years, 2 months agoraffiki77 posted on Coffee.
July 13, 2016

Hi there and welcome to r/Coffee! So based on what you've told me I think your most cost effective option right now to make great coffee would be to master your roommate's French Press instead of spending money on a new brewing method. I'm assuming you have a kettle to boil your water in and a smart phone with a timer so all you need to buy is a digital scale, which costs $15 on Amazon [digital scale] (https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1468429307&sr=8-1&keywords=American+Weigh+SC%E2%80%932KG).
&nbsp; Next I would find a local coffee roaster or coffee house that sells 1/2 lb or 12 oz bags of coffee instead of the 1 lb bags they sell at Starbucks. The reason I'm recommending the smaller amount is because you're going to ask them to grind the coffee beans for a French Press and you don't want to bring home a 1 lb bag of pre-ground coffee beans because it's going to go bad quickly. If you want to grind your own coffee beans be prepared to spend $100+ on a good burr grinder. As for the type of coffee to buy, you can always ask the barista for recommendations.
&nbsp; So once you've got everything you need it's time to measure your dosage. I personally like a 1:17 coffee to water ratio but most people here like their coffee stronger so feel free to adjust according to taste. So based on my ratio, if you measure 25 grams of ground coffee beans you would need to use 425 ml of water (1 ml = 1 gram). Put the FP on the scale and tare the scale. Put 25 g ground coffee in the FP and tare the scale again. Start the stop watch on your phone and pour your water off boil until about 1/3 of the French Press is full. Let the coffee bloom for about 30 seconds, stir the slurry, then pour in the remainder of the water til your scale reads 425 g. Put the lid on the French Press but don't plunge just yet. After 4 minutes you can plunge gently and serve your coffee.
&nbsp; Now from what I've read about the French Press some people say blooming isn't necessary but I haven't use mine enough to experiment and come up with my own conclusion so feel free to skip that part and just pour in the entire water. However, you do need to stir the mixture in to get all of the beans wet so don't skip that part.
&nbsp; Good luck with your coffee journey and I hope you're able to make great tasting coffee on your own!

I love this flower/windmill chemex filter fold. Easy to do too! [R]

3 years, 2 months agonakedmeeple posted submission on Coffee.
June 23, 2016
3 years, 2 months agonakedmeeple posted on Coffee.
June 23, 2016

I use this AWS scale that does the trick just fine for $20.

Digital Scale [R]

3 years, 3 months agoJune 7, 2016

Do you guys have any recommendations on a decent digital scale? I had my very first harvest last night and I'm very proud of my girls! I harvested 2 heavyweight seeds fruit punch plants and I'm guessing I'll have at least 6oz once she's dried and cured. I'll edit with a pic here shortly, the biggest main cola was literally the size of my entire forearm from elbow to fingertip.

Edit: https://imgur.com/C0OHulI that's my main cola, super proud of my girl!

3 years, 3 months ago_fups_ posted on microgrowery.
June 7, 2016

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpapi_AL1vxbYSZSRGR

These are great- stay calibrated and are very durable. 2kg limit and .1g resolution.

Home Coffee Bar [R]

3 years, 3 months agoLuckyBahamut posted submission on Coffee.
June 2, 2016

What are some must have machines and gadgets for your home coffee shop/bar?

So far on my list - espresso machine - Chemex -electric kettle with goose neck -grinder -cold brew kit -French press -espresso cups -mugs -espresso tamper -frothing pitcher -aeropress -locally roasted coffee

What have I forgotten? I know there's a few things for sure.

3 years, 3 months agoLuckyBahamut posted on Coffee.
June 2, 2016

You could spend $150-$220 on an Acaia if you have the spare cash floating around... or you could spend less than $20 on an American Weigh Scale. It's svelte enough to weigh your espresso, but the platform is also wide enough to fit your portafilter or Chemex.

It may not be as water-resistant, and there's a ~2 second delay to reach the final measurement, but mine's held up for over 4 years and I've only had to replace the batteries twice.

What do I need to know RE V60 [R]

3 years, 3 months agoWhaaaooo posted submission on Coffee.
June 1, 2016

I have a Hario V60 with hario filters, I have a hario slim hand grinder, and I have a bonavita gooseneck kettle and I have lightly roasted coffee beans. What else do I need or Need to know to make the best cup of coffee that I can?

3 years, 3 months agoWhaaaooo posted on Coffee.
June 1, 2016

Don't get the V60 scale, go for this one: https://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?ie=UTF8&qid=1464804885&sr=8-2&keywords=AWS+scale

An easy question on how to improve my coffee quality [R]

3 years, 3 months agoBob-Sacamano_ posted submission on Coffee.
May 26, 2016

I have a very simple pourover setup in my office at work that I haven't been entirely happy with. I use freshly roasted, high-quality beans, a Hario mini-mill (set to an appropriate coarseness), a not-so-slow-pouring electric kettle, and a ceramic Melitta dripper using their unbleached #4 filters. I make sure to pre-infuse, but my coffee has always tasted off using this setup. It's seemed weak/under-extracted but I know the setting on my grinder is fine. Is this something that would be affected by either the filters or the kettle? The kettle tends to dump water rather than pour it based on its lip, so the blooms are not very good. If the filter is to blame, what is a good alternative to the Melitta unbleached #4? It does feel pretty thin for a filter...

3 years, 3 months agoBob-Sacamano_ posted on Coffee.
May 27, 2016

Saw you weren't using a scale, a cheap one that's lasted me for the past 3 years without fail is this little guy, AMW-2C

Just to help a little more. What is your brew technique? My typical method is using the Kalita Wave, which is very similar to your Melitta. On my beans a week and under, I bloom for 30 seconds, just under double my coffee weight (30 grams of coffee = 50 gram bloom). Beans over a week I'll bloom for 45 seconds. Then it's business as usual. A tight controlled pour and I try to limit my brew time to under 2:30 (I make 30g batches). SOMETIMES, depending on the coffee, I'll add in some agitation during the bloom, just depends on how I feel that morning.

An easy question on how to improve my coffee quality [R]

3 years, 3 months agod4mini0n posted submission on Coffee.
May 26, 2016

I have a very simple pourover setup in my office at work that I haven't been entirely happy with. I use freshly roasted, high-quality beans, a Hario mini-mill (set to an appropriate coarseness), a not-so-slow-pouring electric kettle, and a ceramic Melitta dripper using their unbleached #4 filters. I make sure to pre-infuse, but my coffee has always tasted off using this setup. It's seemed weak/under-extracted but I know the setting on my grinder is fine. Is this something that would be affected by either the filters or the kettle? The kettle tends to dump water rather than pour it based on its lip, so the blooms are not very good. If the filter is to blame, what is a good alternative to the Melitta unbleached #4? It does feel pretty thin for a filter...

3 years, 3 months agod4mini0n posted on Coffee.
May 26, 2016

You're welcome! I used a $16 AWS for years and they work well, and come with a protective case.

Almost ready to pull the trigger on my first espresso machine! [R]

3 years, 3 months agoMay 26, 2016

[deleted]

3 years, 3 months agoLuckyBahamut posted on Coffee.
May 26, 2016

Get a good tamper. Looks like Clive Coffee sells a 53 mm tamper and a Rattleware version.

Don't forget a scale, preferably one with 0.1 g precision for weighing out your liquid output.

Opinions on a Beginner Setup [R]

3 years, 4 months agoFrozenClear posted submission on Coffee.
May 6, 2016

Hey /r/coffee, I'm relatively new to "good" coffee. I've essentially have been drinking coffee from cheap machines or Keurigs my whole life.

I've finally decided to delve into my journey for better tasting coffee after buying another cheap coffee machine and not being able to get the "plastic taste" out of it; I tried many different methods, numerous times.

I've done a great deal of research and have come up with a list of gear I'm thinking about ordering for my first "good coffee" setup. I would really appreciate any and all recommendations or feed back on it!

  • AeroPress
  • Hario Ceramic Coffee Mill Skerton
  • Brentwood 1.2 Liter Stainless Steel Tea Kettle Model KT-1770

I was thinking about just dropping the extra 20$ to get a nice gooseneck kettle instead of the electric Brentwood Kettle, this way if I ever want to transition to pour over, I'll already have it... Also, is a hand grinder a good match for an AeroPress?

Thank you in advanced!

3 years, 4 months agoFrozenClear posted on Coffee.
May 6, 2016

I recently purchased this one: Scale

it works well for me. Just search amazon for digital pocket scale with a 2kg range and 0.1g accuracy. There are so many options I'm sure you'll fine something for you!

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

3 years, 4 months agoplainsightgames posted submission on Coffee.
May 6, 2016

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily, the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

3 years, 4 months agoplainsightgames posted on Coffee.
May 6, 2016

LOVE the 155. You only see 185s out there, but those are designed for large volume brewing (20oz.+ yields). Way to get the right device for the brewing you're doing! Here's my (professional barista and coffee educator 5 yr.s+) take on your 3 questions:

1) You're doing it right, almost: Don't let the bed get quite dry. Keep all the grounds underwater. Grinding finer can solve this problem, but can create other problems (overextraction). The best thing to do is to work on controlling your flow rate: pour a slower, thinner stream every time you pour. 2) A scale is THE good/fast/cheap way to measure water. Here's my favorite. It's affordable and durable: http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1462558620&sr=8-1&keywords=aws+2kg 3) Your temp control method might be giving you water that's a little too hot. If you grind finer (see above), too-hot water will exacerbate overextraction. Generally, I don't go back to heat between every pulse. Try setting it on the low-heat burner every-other pulse. At home (away from the shop) I use a plug-in electric kettle. I let it boil. I immediately pour it into my gooseneck. That transfer drops temp to approx 207F.

My first chemex brew! [R]

3 years, 5 months agoaskeeve posted submission on Coffee.
April 18, 2016
3 years, 5 months agoaskeeve posted on Coffee.
April 19, 2016

thesweethome.com recommended this one http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2 but I'll look into your recommendation as well. Thanks!

We're buying our first pourover setup. Is this a good start? [R]

3 years, 5 months agorcurty posted submission on Coffee.
April 7, 2016

My girlfriend and I are buying our first pourover setup. We're just getting into it now. The plan is to buy a Chemex and a Hario Buono Kettle.

I already have a decent grinder (I think) - the Krups GVX.

The scale we plan on using is the kitchen scale we already have, which isn't too bad.

Would it make sense to buy this as a starting setup? Would it be better to invest in one of the fancier scales instead of the kettle?

Thanks!

3 years, 5 months agorcurty posted on Coffee.
April 7, 2016

A scale makes it a lot easier to get repeatable results. I suggest this one (it does not have a timer but you can always use your phone): American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrcpawd_ccVbxb1HGC3MM

I also recommend you get a thermometer and add it to your kettle. It's simple to do, just widen one of the vent holes in the lid with a drill bit and drop it in. It will eliminate the waiting-so-many-minutes-from-boil game and it's cheap. I suggest this thermometer: Update International (THFR-17) 5 1/2"-Long Dial Frothing Thermometer https://www.amazon.com/dp/B0002Y1JYU/ref=cmswrcpawd_SaVbxb8NP6A6A

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

3 years, 5 months agoWhiskyandtinder posted submission on Coffee.
March 25, 2016

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily, the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

3 years, 5 months agoWhiskyandtinder posted on Coffee.
March 29, 2016

Acaia, for sure. I use a Pearl at my current job to dial in and it's unbelievable.

At home, I use a small AWS scale for all of my coffee making, baking, and calorie tracking. It's weighing something at least 15+ times a day and hasn't let me down.

Love the Aeropress, but struggled with premature draining. Inverted method changed me. Brew recipe within! [R]

3 years, 5 months agoyokken posted submission on Coffee.
March 27, 2016

Disclaimer: This gets a little long-winded, as I just finished my morning coffee. If you just want the recipe, feel free to scroll down to the bullet points.

I have always loved the bold coffee that comes out of the Aeropress. I've had one for about 6 years but only really started using it about 3 years ago. Tons of flavor, but little to no grounds. I actually quite enjoy the sift at the bottom of an Aeropress cup; it kinda lingers and keeps the coffee taste around. I really should rinse my mouth out after a cup, though. To prevent staining and whatnot.

The thing that kills the Aeropress for me is premature draining. Bubbles will sneak up under the filter and then coffee starts rushing through the tiny gap under the filter, and all of a sudden I've got grounds and everything in my cup. I can filter this through another Aeropress (empty current one, put new filter in, dump coffee cup into chamber and drain into new cup) but it doesn't taste the same.

I've been doing Japanese iced coffee a lot, along with French press and regular V60 carafes. I know as long as I prepare it right, it won't decide to screw me over during the brew process. Well, I decided a week ago I was going to try the inverted Aeropress method because I love the punchy flavors. I watched a few videos just to make sure I knew what I was doing, then made a cup. It turned out pretty well! A little juicy acidity, maybe some bitterness/sourness but overall, beyond drinkable, and delicious. I thought "huh, maybe that whole inverted thing isn't such a crock of $#!*".

Fast forward to yesterday, Saturday morning. I say to myself, "self, you really enjoyed that inverted Aeropress. Let's give that another shot." So I get my butt out of bed and proceed to prep everything. I chose a light Colombian roast from Craft Coffee. I tried roughly the same proportions I used last week, though I didn't write them down before, and all in all the cup turned out great.

I replicated the process this morning with an amazing Kenyan from Craft Coffee, and am posting here because I nailed the proportions and flavor profile. I just realized the proportions are actually quite high, 1:13 instead of 1:16. Even then, there's no sourness or bitterness. You can add more hot water to this "concentrate" for a 1:16 ~350mL cup. Without further ado, here's my recipe for a 10oz (~300mL) Aeropress cup using 1:13 proportions.

  • Fill a kettle with ~400mL of water, heat to 205F/97C (or boiling, whatever you prefer)
  • Measure out 21.5-22g of beans
  • Grind size on my Virtuoso is 14 - quite a bit finer than French press grind, a bit finer than V60, but still a bit more coarse than espresso - you're shooting for granules about the size of sea salt or maybe even slightly finer, depending on the salt
  • Invert the Aeropress by putting the plunger in the tube, but leave as much room in the tube as possible (while still being confident the plunger won't come out)
  • Add coffee grounds
  • Start timer and begin pouring a little slowly, as to avoid over-foaming, but aim to fill the entire tube in about 10 seconds
  • Stir, make sure grounds on the bottom get moving. The foam should also reduce as well, so top it off with water, almost to the brim of the tube. This is around a total of 220mL.
  • Around the 30-45 sec mark, pre-wet your filter and shake the water out. Make sure the filter is flat against the basket.
  • Around the 1min mark, put the filter basket on top of the tube and lock it on
  • Maybe do this over a sink - CAREFULLY grab the tube with one hand, upside down coffee cup in the other, place the coffee cup on top of the filter, and in one controlled fluid motion, tip the entire rig and set the coffee cup down.
  • Begin plunging immediately after setting the cup down.
  • Entire brew process from start of pouring to plunging finish should be around 1m30s.
  • Add the rest of your hot water for a total of ~300mL. This results in a rough 1:13 or 1:14 ratio depending on how much water you add. 350mL divided by 22g of beans results in almost the golden 1g beans to 16g water ratio.

I'm posting this in hopes that someone who also was close to giving up on the Aeropress is able to painlessly experience the explosion of flavor and creaminess capable of this wonderful setup. If you try this method and it works for you, or you made some tweaks, I'd love to hear them!! And if you read the entire post up to now, well, I'm not sure to compliment you or question your sanity. Sip on.

P.S. Craft Coffee really is killer. I have no ties to them but I highly recommend people take a look. I love the variety but sometimes it's hard to really tell the difference without using an Aeropress or French press, something that can present the bold flavors accurately. This is why I really wanted to get my Aeropress going again. When you sign up you also get a referral code to give out that gets other people 15% off their order, and gets you a free bag of coffee if they sign up for a subscription. You can choose which roast profiles you like, and you can rate them after the fact so CC can send you different roasters/styles that you might like more. I've been subscribed for the light/ultralight roasts (purple/light blue) for a year and a half now, if not two years, and I haven't looked back. I usually buy a bag locally for super fresh stuff in between CC shipments - Dogwood Coffee in Minneapolis has a Mora Mora from Ethiopia that is TO DIE FOR. The Kenyan I had today was one of the best cups I've had in months, which reminded me why I love CC and the Aeropress. Tons of variety and tons of flavor. The Kenyan today was described as the following: "deep and complex - a bracing citrus and black currant acidity soar with notes of cranberry, orange zest and milk chocolate with a big creamy body and tannic finish." I personally tasted the chocolate and fruit notes, and it was amazing. Very creamy body and a slightly darker roast than I normally get - not super light but def not dark, maybe a City+. Truly a heavenly cup.

3 years, 5 months agoyokken posted on Coffee.
March 27, 2016

You know, I really don't know where the ratio came from! I just read it in many places, including Sweet Maria's, SomethingAwful's coffee thread, Reddit, and probably some product pages or random tutorials/videos scattered throughout the web. It seems to be an ideal ratio that gives you just enough of the flavor without wasting beans or making it difficult to get a proper extraction, with the coffee ending up too sour as a result of too short a brew/too coarse grounds or too bitter, as a result of too long a brew/too fine grounds. Adding more grounds means you need a longer brew time, and from what I've experienced, most people's brew times revolve around the 1:16 ratio (or at least seem to work best for it). By all means, play with the ratio, but 1:16 should serve as a good starting point. I've brewed 1:14 ratio and 1:18 ratio and they both taste great. 1:14 has a real punch to it with something like the Aeropress, but can be hard to brew without a little sourness or bitterness, and 1:18 is sometimes a little watery/muted through something like a V60 or Chemex.

Get a scale like this one for under $20. Take notes when you start brewing, so you can keep a consistent grind size, water temp, grounds mass, and water mass. Water is 1g per mL so it's really easy to measure it out without a measuring cup - just throw the kettle on your scale, tare it, and fill the kettle! Take note of what time you stopped pouring (or how long until you ran out of water), and the time it finished draining. Aim for ~3min brew time on pourover, usually "blooming" for first 30sec, then finishing pour around 2min. Like I mentioned in the OP, the Aeropress brew takes about half that time. Once you make a really great cup, draw tons of circles and arrows and make sure you don't lose that recipe! You can put it into a text document on your computer of course. I have about 6 pages of notes, front and back, from when I was really into coffee and was brewing it every day or every other day. I don't need to mess with settings anymore because I've got my whole setup dialed in.

Edit: Sorry to whomever downvoted me... trying to help someone who said they just got into coffee.

Good coffee scale? [R]

3 years, 6 months agoMarch 14, 2016

My scale seems to inconsistently drift by a gram or two. I'd tare it to the weight of my grinder's container, and if I grind more coffee and weigh it again enough times, sometimes the result is off by a couple grams from where I started.

I can't remember what exact scale I have (it was in the $20-$40 range, one of the popular ones on Amazon). Is this a common issue? Do you know of any scales that are more consistent? What do baristas use?

Just got a Chemex and have a couple questions [R]

3 years, 6 months agoMarch 5, 2016

[deleted]

3 years, 6 months agoyokken posted on Coffee.
March 5, 2016

I have a Virtuoso as well, but be aware that your grind settings are not going to align 1:1 with everyone else's. That said, I use around a 24-25 size grind for my V60 and French Press, as my go-to coarse grind. This would probably be a decent starting place, but grind coarser if you're brewing more coffee (as it'll take longer to drain w/ more grounds).

Also, get a scale. You can get a .1g accuracy scale on Amazon for $20. This is the one I have and it works great. You'll want to weigh your beans and water - shoot for a 1:16 to 1:18 ratio. I always go for 1:16, meaning 1g of beans per 16g of water (which is equivalent to 16mL). For a ~300mL cup of coffee, I use around 19g of beans. Stick to this ratio, play with your pour method, maybe use a little less or little more beans or water.

Keep notes!!! You'll want to remember which brew worked out very well for you. I usually record the brew method, amount of water, amount of beans, age/freshness of the beans (affects brew time), grind size, water temp, and then the milestones of the brew and when they occurred (e.g. T+1m57s - finished pouring). Then I note the time when it finished draining. I've really dialed in my setup by going over the notes and making slight tweaks until I find something that really works.

Best kitchen/food scales? [R]

3 years, 7 months agoGeriskury posted submission on bodybuilding.
Feb. 17, 2016

[removed]

3 years, 7 months agoGeriskury posted on bodybuilding.
Feb. 17, 2016

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?ie=UTF8&qid=1455736601&sr=8-2&keywords=american+weigh+scale

Works for everything. Measures grams. Seems accurate enough. Small though.

Scale questions [R]

3 years, 7 months agoCanoo posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 30, 2016

I recently purchased a Chemex and gooseneck kettle and am now in the market for a scale. What is the advantage of buying a scale that measures to .1 gram? Most (almost all) of the ones I see in stores are accurate to 1 gram. I'm wondering if I can get by with one accurate to .1 gram.

3 years, 7 months agoCanoo posted on Coffee.
Jan. 30, 2016

There's loads of scales that go up to 2kg with a 0.1g resolution on amazon just fyi. This one gets recommended here a lot: http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

I can't see many coffee brewing scenarios where you'd need a scale larger than 2kg.

Newbie looking to purchase a scale for an aeropress/chemex set up. Would really appreciate some suggestions. [R]

3 years, 8 months agorDr4g0n posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 7, 2016

I own an aeropress and recently just got a chemex for christmas. I've just been eyeballing my coffee, but considering I have 2 serious pieces of manual brewing equipment, I figured it was worth getting more accurate.

There's a lot of options out there and I'm a bit overwhelmed. I want to be able to measure the weight of the coffee grounds, as well as how much water to pour into the aeropress/chemex. I think this means that the scale must be sensitive enough to detect small nuances with just grams of coffee, as well as handle a weighty aeropress/chemex on top while I pour water in. I think this also means the reading output has to be relatively quick so I know when to stop pouring. I could be wrong on my analysis of these elements. Can someone please suggest scales under $30 that would be durable and fitting for my current setup? Much appreciated, thanks!

3 years, 8 months agorDr4g0n posted on Coffee.
Jan. 7, 2016

Heres a not-so-easy-to-find wiki page for this sub with gear recommendations. I used this one multiple times a day. It's fast, accurate, good battery life, and doesn't time out too quickly.

Scale recommendations [R]

3 years, 8 months agodarkmega354 posted submission on tea.
Dec. 31, 2015

What kind of scale should I get for measuring tea, I'm trying to be more consistent than "eh that looks about right"

3 years, 8 months agodarkmega354 posted on tea.
Dec. 31, 2015

I use this American Weigh scale for both coffee and tea, and it works super well. It's nice and small, and measures to 0.1 grams!

[MOD] Show off your gear! - Battle-station Central, Holiday spoils edition! [R]

3 years, 8 months agogreenspacechunks posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 28, 2015

It's time for the weekly Gear Show!

Let's see your battle-stations or new purchases, especially anything you may have received over the holidays. Tell us what it is you have, post pictures if you want, let us know what you think and how you use it all to make your daily Cup of Joe.

Feel free to post links to where people can get the gear but please no sketchy deal sites and none of those Amazon (or other site) links where you get a percentage if people buy it, they will be removed. Also, if you want battle-stations every day of the week instead of just Mondays, check out /r/coffeestations!

Thanks!

3 years, 8 months agogreenspacechunks posted on Coffee.
Dec. 28, 2015

http://imgur.com/hpvDWrh

Just got a Chemex for Christmas, help! [R]

3 years, 8 months agokd8aqz posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 27, 2015

Hey guys,

So I just received a Chemex 6 cup for Christmas. I already have the beans from a local roaster, Vigilante Coffee in D.C. Now, I need recommendations for a gooseneck kettle and a grinder. I'd like something entry level or a bit higher (Not too expensive). I've never made a pourover coffee before and before getting this Chemex and buying these beans, I used to just drink shitty machine drip coffee.

Additional questions:

  • Anything else I should get? How do you guys measure your bean to water ratio? Do I need a scale?

  • Any good pourover step-by-step instructions?

  • How can I keep my coffee hot? I tried making a cup through the Chemex and by the time I poured it into my cup, the coffee wasn't hot enough for my liking.

Edit: Thank you all so much. This was extremely helpful. I decided to get the Hario Skerton grinder and some generic cheap kitchen scale. Learned some really good tips. Thank you again!

3 years, 8 months agokd8aqz posted on Coffee.
Dec. 27, 2015

Baratza grinders are hard to beat. If you can manage to wait a little while, they offer refurbished models for sale too (I think they update on Thursday mornings US Eastern time) - https://www.baratza.com/cgi-bin/commerce.cgi?search=action&category=RFRB

For a scale, I use and love the the American Weigh 2Kg scale. It has 0.1g resolution to measure your beans and because it can measure up to 2Kg you can put the Chemex right on it and measure your water while you brew! Plus, it's under $20USD. http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-SC-2KG-Digital-Pocket/dp/B001RF3XJ2

If you have an iPhone, Intelligentsia has a great app that has guides for all sorts of different brew methods. It includes timers and calculators to let you know how much water to use for a given amount of coffee. (Sorry, I can't help with android apps). http://www.intelligentsiacoffee.com/content/iphone-app

I haven't gotten a gooseneck kettle yet and have been using a 2L electric kettle without any temp control. I use a thermometer every year or so to measure how long it takes for the amount of water I put into it to cool off from a boil to ~200F (which is around 2 minutes) and then just set a timer when I use it. That said, this kettle is on my wish list: http://www.amazon.com/Bonavita-Variable-Temperature-Electric-Gooseneck/dp/B005YR0F40

I make a pot of coffee with the Chemex almost every morning before going to work. I use a Klean Kanteen insulated bottle (http://www.kleankanteen.com/products/wide-mouth-insulated-20oz?variant=1605388483) and some generic travel mug. Before brewing I pour boiling water through the filter of the Chemex and also into the bottle. Then when it's time to brew I pour the water from the Chemex into the travel mug and brew the Chemex as normal. Post brew - empty the warming water from mug and bottle, and pour in the coffee. The mug doesn't keep things warm for very long, but the bottle works pretty well for several hours.

Happy brewing!

What is your ratio of beans to water for Aeropress? [R]

3 years, 10 months agoa_vinny_01 posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 4, 2015

I am testing around for optimal taste and amount of coffee to drink. I don't like bringing my coffee in a thermos. I am currently using approximately two scoops from the scooper provided and pouring enough water to hit the "3" on the aeropress. How much do you use for espresso? for a regular cup?

3 years, 10 months agoa_vinny_01 posted on Coffee.
Nov. 5, 2015

The problem trying to do that is that the weight of a specific volume of beans is dependent on roast. I'm brewing in my aeropress on top of this: American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrawd8LVowbC993T1D https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrawd8LVowbC993T1D

[Gear] Any alternatives to the Hario Drip Scale? [R]

3 years, 10 months agoOct. 28, 2015

[deleted]

3 years, 10 months agoRoarence posted on Coffee.
Oct. 28, 2015

I've come a long way since Mr. coffee [R]

4 years agophotomikey posted submission on coffeestations.
Aug. 22, 2015
4 years agophotomikey posted on coffeestations.
Aug. 23, 2015

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrawdTtv2vbY36H4CA

Seems to be a pretty popular scale. I see it used at a handful of shops and it works great for my pour overs at home.

Affordable coffee weighing scales? [R]

4 years, 1 month agoFoodeatFood posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 4, 2015

Looking for scales to weigh my coffee grounds and was wondering if anyone could recommend any that were affordable but precise? Is it possible to get good scales for around £15 ($25) ?

4 years, 1 month agoFoodeatFood posted on Coffee.
Aug. 4, 2015

https://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrawdpSmWvbK2YMASR

This is the one I use as well as the one my local coffee shop uses. Very reliable and on sale right now!

How do I enjoy acidic/bright coffee notes? [R]

4 years, 1 month agoVolatileBeans posted submission on Coffee.
July 20, 2015

It just...tastes sour.

I had a specialist come and fix the espresso machine at work. It was very bitter so he made the grind finer and reduced the amount to prevent the grinds from being in contact with the grouphead. He pulled a 15~ second shot and claimed it was delicious and the right notes for their blend. I tried it and it was insanely sour (I'm new to coffee, mind you). I've since made the grind finer and it has a tobacco flavor with a bit less sour.

I tried a pourover of Ethiopian from a specialty coffee shop. The tasting notes were: mandarin orange, red wine, and cacao. It tasted a bit sour, but palatable. I also don't like wines at all. I wish I had more ways to describe it but I don't know how.

I bought a bag of Peet's Luminosa, roasted 6/22/15. I think that I should try "bad" coffee to develop a taste for good. It was very, very sour. I used an aeropress with rough measurements.

How can I develop my tastes? Is my tongue just wrong?

4 years, 1 month agoVolatileBeans posted on Coffee.
July 20, 2015

Coffee tastes the way it does to you because you have no baseline. The day I began to really taste coffee was the day I had 10 cups lined up side by side in a tasting and got to walk around tasting each one while a mentor of mine told me the roaster, origin, and the notes he tasted.

Coffee is one of those things where it will always taste like "coffee." You'll never drink a cup that tastes like orange juice. What you will get is a coffee with a hint of orange or a finish that resembles tobacco.

Every time you go out and eat a basic ingredient (like almonds, pears, oranges... not cream chicken, salsa, etc.) really taste that ingredient. Don't just shove 10 almonds in your mouth and chomp down on it. Stick the almond in your mouth and let it almost melt there. Let your saliva do a lot of the work for you. It'll turn into some pretty gross paste as you slowly chew it. Let that coat your whole tongue so every tastebud is really activated. The more things you begin to taste and recognize, the more you'll begin to notice different flavors in coffee.

And one last thing that I've found that helps me specifically with espresso is not to serve it into a tiny 2 oz demitasse cup. Even if you're only pulling 30 grams or 36 grams. Put it in a cappuccino cup that's like 8 oz. It has a much wider opening so you can really stick your nose in there while you're sipping and get all the aromas while also tasting the espresso.

One last thing (I'll keep saying one last thing until I'm actually done, I guess) is get a scale. AWS makes a very popular scale that's less then ~$20 here the absolute BIGGEST improvement you can make to your coffee is a very good grinder and consistent weights in and out. Weigh the weight of every shot's grinds and weigh the liquid weight out. If you want good recommendations on where to start based your portafilter basket size (a smaller basket needs a smaller dose so that it won't hit the dispersion screen above, and a larger one needs a higher dose) you can feel free to send me a message.

Kitchen scale for baking [R]

4 years, 2 months agoJuly 4, 2015

[deleted]

4 years, 2 months agodalban posted on AskCulinary.
July 4, 2015

I have that used the Smart Weigh and have founded it to be kind of jankey -- it is slow to settle and sometimes doesn't weigh the same thing at exactly the same weight. This scale is a better choice if you must have .1 gram resolution, but I use it primarily for coffee where total weight is likely to be under 2kg.

For baking, I find I frequently exceed that weight when using glass bowls, large batches, wet recipes, etc. I would actually suggest Jennings CJ4000, it has good accuracy, it's fast and has twice the total capacity.

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

4 years, 4 months agog2x222 posted submission on Coffee.
May 15, 2015

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread! There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life? Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend. If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

4 years, 4 months agog2x222 posted on Coffee.
May 15, 2015

I realized I live near a solid roaster, so I'm thinking about putting together a kit to make decent coffee at work.

  • Aeropress - I might get the ABLE filter when I run out of paper filters
  • Water - I have a temp-controlled Bonavita Gooseneck on its way
  • Scale
  • Grinder??? - This is where I need help

I'm stuck debating between an electric (Baratza Encore) or a hand grinder (probably the Porlex JP-30). I like the idea of an electric in case I have company (admittedly, not often at the moment). Downsides of the electric - I'd have to grind at home in the morning. Will the ground coffee degrade in the 30-60 minutes it would take me to get to work and get situated? What would you do?

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

4 years, 4 months ago0400_brew_it posted submission on Coffee.
May 8, 2015

Welcome to the weekly /r/Coffee question thread! There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily the /r/Coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/Coffee members recommend. If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

4 years, 4 months ago0400_brew_it posted on Coffee.
May 8, 2015

As mentioned already, the American Weigh SC-2KG and Jennings CJ4000 are good inexpensive scales. I like the Hario Drip Scale as well, it's nice for pour overs- especially with the stand and drip tray but it is a bit pricey. If you are considering the American Weigh SC-2KG, there's also the American Weigh SC-2KG-A, which is basically the same scale but it includes a power cord and I believe that the auto shutoff is disabled when plugged in. It's definitely not necessary though, I haven't heard of anyone having problems with the shut off and the batteries should last a very long time, but it's only ~$5 more and could come in handy at some point.

Whenever I brew with a French Press I decant as soon as the brew time is up, then I immediately dump the grinds, rinse everything well, and leave it all to air dry. I always disassemble the filter assembly and inspect it for stowaway grounds before each French Press brew and clean it further if needed.

Bought a digital scales and realised my mistakes [R]

4 years, 5 months agoJJTheJetPlane5657 posted submission on loseit.
April 15, 2015

Got sick of the old school scales, bought a digital scales and oh my god. My guesstimates have been so off for so long. I was consuming about 850 calories everytime I had porridge and toast in the morning rather than the maybe 400 I was guessing at because I never weighed anything. Anyone else have this realisation?

homemade cold brew questions. [R]

4 years, 5 months agoWhiskyandtinder posted submission on Coffee.
March 24, 2015

Been a coffee drinker for decade or so, and have always drank hot black coffee. But recently I've been drinking a lot of iced coffee (its just too damn hot in the South to drink hot coffee all day). I started making my own cold brew coffee, and I was wondering if anyone else had any recommendations or advice for me.

My method:

  • 4 tablespoons of medium roast/medium grind good fresh coffee

  • 2 cups of room temp tap water

  • set in mason jar for 12-24 hrs, depending on my schedule

  • strain grounds out in a pour over coffee filter

  • refrigerate until cold, then mix with chocolate milk and drink

How does this sound, anything I could be doing better? ratios/ingredients/etc

Any and all replies are appreciated.

Thanks!

** note: office I work in doesn't have a freezer, so true ice coffee isn't practical

4 years, 5 months agoWhiskyandtinder posted on Coffee.
March 24, 2015

Well, I was only asking those questions to try and field if there were any specific issues that you were having.

If what you're doing is (a) working and (b) consistent, then keep it up. Since there are a lot of variables that are out of your hands (e.g. type of bean, grind size, freshness), then I'd suggest focusing on making the variables that you can control the best possible.

Filtering the water, or maybe even using bottled water, will likely make your brew better. Since you can't control what beans are being used, I'd recommend investing in a cheap gram scale to repeat your results in the event that your office gets a different type of coffee from the same roaster.

Also, do you have a refrigerator? I know you don't have a freezer, but I found that brewing for 18ish hours in the refrigerator greatly increased flavor and mouthfeel over 12ish hours at room temperature. Something to try/think about, especially during those times when your schedule requires you to brew it for a longer period of time.

Please help me make an equipment decision! [R]

4 years, 7 months agoFeb. 7, 2015

[deleted]

4 years, 7 months agoelliottok posted on Coffee.
Feb. 7, 2015

If you want espresso on a budget, the Breville Infuser is a much better machine than the Silvia. I honestly don't understand how the Silvia is still around at that price point. No PID, no pre-infusion, bad customer service if any. If you want to go down the espresso road, the Infuser and a Baratza grinder would be a good match.

For scales, I would go with this one from American Weigh Systems:

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr13?ie=UTF8&qid=1423331306&sr=8-3&keywords=american+weigh+scale

If in doubt, add more coffee (v60) [R]

4 years, 7 months agobob_mcbob posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 29, 2015

So thanks to this subreddit I picked up a v60 to use at work. Every morning I grind beans at home in my hario skerton and take them to work.

Normally I use two scoops of ground coffee for a single cup, but today I used around 3.5 (single cup). What a difference it has made.

Also another user on here suggested filling the aeropress to number 1 with coffee and I thought they were insane but it makes a better cup.

4 years, 7 months agobob_mcbob posted on Coffee.
Jan. 29, 2015

Do yourself a favour and get an inexpensive digital scale so you can see how much coffee and water you're actually using.

http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/

How's this for a newbie? Not much time for me in the morning, but I'm tired of keurig coffee! [R]

4 years, 7 months agoTiggieSmalls posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 29, 2015
4 years, 7 months agoTiggieSmalls posted on Coffee.
Jan. 29, 2015

A scale that reads to 0.1 will be extremely beneficial, worlds of difference.

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr121?s=kitchen&ie=UTF8&qid=1422533237&sr=1-21&keywords=scale

throw this in your cart and you'll thank yourself :)

Scouring for scales [R]

4 years, 7 months agod4mini0n posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 20, 2015

Hi! First post to reddit. brief cheers

I absolutely love coffee. You guys do to. Let's skip to brass tax. I am currently in the process of getting a Bonavita 1-Liter Variable Temperature Gooseneck Kettle, and have now begun to look for scales.

I am a college student on a binding budget, so the kettle was brutal. With that, I'd love if someone knew of a scale that would be great for measuring out a french press while making it and eventually for a pour over kit. Great appreciation!

4 years, 7 months agod4mini0n posted on Coffee.
Jan. 20, 2015

I use the slightly larger one since I need the extra room/weight capacity for my chemex. It works well for me.

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

4 years, 8 months agoCRT_HERO posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 9, 2015

Welcome to the weekly /r/coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily the /r/coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

4 years, 8 months agoCRT_HERO posted on Coffee.
Jan. 9, 2015

Until recently, coffee was just a means to an end for me- an unpleasant beverage to be endured for warmth and caffeine. Now I know that coffee is very diverse and capable of being fantastically delicious.

I want to start brewing great coffee at home, and I currently have ~$150 to put towards gear. I have an electric kettle and a digital food thermometer, and I just received a French press and a pour-over cone. It looks like a decent burr grinder should be my first priority, then a scale, gooseneck kettle, and other brewing methods.

As far as grinders go, I've been trying to decide between the Baratza Encore and the Capresso Infinity. If I get the Encore, the only other thing I'd be able to get for now is a cheap scale like the American Weigh SC-2KG. I can get the Infinity for $70, and then I'd have more options. Which grinder would you go with? How would you spend the money? I'll be able to pick up other things later, I don't need or expect to get everything right now.

I am getting my first Chemex, and I am in need of a scale. What is a decent scale that I could get? [R]

4 years, 8 months agoJan. 7, 2015
4 years, 8 months agocryptowillem posted on Coffee.
Jan. 7, 2015

I use the American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG. It has a 0.1g resolution and you can disable the auto-off if you plug it in.

It doesn't have a timer like the Hario, but it's a whole lot cheaper.

I am getting my first Chemex, and I am in need of a scale. What is a decent scale that I could get? [R]

4 years, 8 months agoJan. 7, 2015
4 years, 8 months agoBrownigan09 posted on Coffee.
Jan. 7, 2015

I've been using this AWS scale with my Chemex for a while now.

Pretty cheap, accurate to 0.1g, and the 2kg max weight is more than enough (Chemex weighs ~600g with rinsed filter IIRC).

Daily rant/vent/squee/chat thread 2014-12-29 [R]

4 years, 8 months agoNam-Ereh-Won posted submission on Random_Acts_Of_Amazon.
Dec. 29, 2014

You know those things that you want to talk about but don't really account for a discussion? Feel free to talk about them here. If you're uncomfortable posting here, you can always message the mods . If you're seeking more help than what is offered here, please visit one of the following links:

Are you new here?

Welcome! Before you get started, please be sure to read our FAQ and rules. This will tell you all you need to know about setting up a wishlist, introducing yourself to the community, and finding fun things to do!

4 years, 8 months agoNam-Ereh-Won posted on Random_Acts_Of_Amazon.
Dec. 29, 2014

Here's the scale I use. I also purchased a calibration weight so I can make sure it's tared and measuring properly!

Currently have a french press. I see slot of recommendations for aeropress and chemex. Is there any advantage to getting one of those? [R]

4 years, 9 months ago0x6d1e posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 10, 2014

I also so hario come up. Should I look into that? I'm a newb to all this and don't know about any these gadgets.

4 years, 9 months ago0x6d1e posted on Coffee.
Dec. 11, 2014

The French Press brewing method gives you a very full-bodied cup, but the trade-off is that the flavors "muddy" a bit rather than being clear and crisp.

Chemex is pretty much the polar opposite; as a pour-over method with a paper filter, it gives you a cup with a lot of clarity but fairly low body. The Hario V60/V90 and Melitta pour-overs are similar in many ways, but the filters have different characteristics and they don't typically come with a brewing vessel (you can brew straight into a cup, but then you can't really see what you're doing).

Aeropress is a bit in-between -- it's an immersion brewing method, just like the french press, but also uses a paper filter which reduces body but increases clarity. (If you get one, throw out the included directions. They're universally regarded as silly).

However, before you go about expanding your brewing gear horizons, make sure you have the basics:

  • A good-quality grinder. The most important place to spend money on high-quality gear. Getting a good, consistent grind at the grind size you need for each method is important. Check the sidebar and wiki here for details.

  • A way to temp your hot water. If you already have an electric or stove-top kettle, then buy a measuring cup or a steaming pitcher and a steaming thermometer that clips to it. You'll bring water to boil, then decant into the other vessel and wait until the temp is right before brewing. If you want to spend more for convenience, consider a temperature-controlled kettle. If you're buying a kettle, spend a bit more for gooseneck: it makes life much easier for almost every brewing method.

  • A scale. Measuring coffee by volume will net inconsistent results. A gram scale will help you control this easily, and they aren't expensive. I use this AWS scale and like it; but you don't have to even spend $20 if you don't want. Just make sure it'll measure 0.1g increments.

These will help you get the best results out of any brew method you experiment with.

Just an update about what I got my husband for christmas! [R]

4 years, 9 months agomemoriessobright posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 9, 2014

Here is a picture of everything I got him!

Pictured:

-Aeropress Coffee and Espresso Maker

-Bodum Bistro Electric Burr Coffee Grinder

-Freshly roasted beans( Dec 3rd, House of Good) from Blue Bottle to have on Christmas, with another being shipped on (around) the 23rd.

-Lastly, he needs a digital scale which I'll pick up at walmart!

Thanks for all the help!

4 years, 9 months agomemoriessobright posted on Coffee.
Dec. 10, 2014

This scale has served me well over the last few years. Can't recommend it enough.

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

Critique my brewing method? [R]

4 years, 9 months agoDec. 5, 2014

[deleted]

4 years, 9 months agoMeitachi posted on Coffee.
Dec. 5, 2014

I'd like to add on a digital scale since water-to-bean ratios can be fun to play around with as well. There are a few recommendations in the Wiki on the side bar. I personally have the American Weight Scale AMW-SC-2KG but there are a lot of other scales out there to fit a range of budget requirements.

[Gear]Scale for a Clever Dripper [R]

4 years, 9 months agobreeett posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 22, 2014

I'm looking to buy a scale to use with my Clever Dripper. I did some research and find the Jennings CJ4000, but Amazon.com did not ship it in Canada and the same scale on Amazon.ca is 60$. Do you have other suggestion for a scale that I can fit the Clever on it? Thanks!

4 years, 9 months agobreeett posted on Coffee.
Nov. 22, 2014

This scale fits my clever perfectly.

[Question] Newcomer - Check my buylist please? [R]

4 years, 10 months agoEzaraku posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 19, 2014

Hey guys,

I'm lookin' to get into the coffee scene. Up to now I've had a few run-ins with coffee... Starbucks, local shop, Keurig, etc. But I would say I know relatively nothing about the subject. I've been reading as much of the sidebar as possible.

I'm looking for something I will be able to make fairly effortlessly in the mornings. Fill up a thermos and off to class. I've come to a standstill between a french press and the Aeropress. I'm leaning towards the french press because it makes more at one time than the Aeropress.

One real quick question to start off - I'm fairly certain I won't like the coffee black, at least not right away. I enjoy flavors that I've experienced with things like mocha lattes. Is there a way to get a similar effect or to just get away from the harsh bitterness? I can't think of much other than just adding some milk in there.

So here's what I believe I'll be needing per the newbie guide:

French Press

Grinder

Scale

Found a cool Coffee Tin

I've got a Thermos like this

I plan on finding beans somewhere around campus or locally. If I'm missing anything else, please let me know! Otherwise, please check out what I believe my procedure will be, again, if anything could be improved please let me know:

  • Throw some water in the microwave
  • Weigh beans (60g for that liter press)
  • Grind beans
  • Beans into press
  • A bit of water on them and stir
  • Wait 30 seconds
  • Fill the rest and press
  • Wait about 4 minutes
  • Dump in thermos
  • Additives?
4 years, 10 months agoEzaraku posted on Coffee.
Nov. 19, 2014

I believe I found it

Thanks!

[Gear][Question] Help me finish my home setup /r/coffee! [R]

4 years, 10 months agoseevi posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 17, 2014

I am just now getting into the whole home brew setup, and finally have all the pieces coming together. I currently have the following:

On top of the above, I have also been given a bodum brazil from my parents after talking to them about coffee, and have recently obtained a Cuisinart EM-100 as a wedding gift. I know it's not preferred, but for now, I will make do with it and see what kind of results I can yield.

ANYWAY, the last thing I want to purchase for this home set-up is a scale, but I have been having a hard time deciding between this American Weigh and the Jennings CJ4000. On top of that, a friend of mine has told me that he uses this Mira. I've searched, but I'm having a hard time deciding between the above. So I come to you /r/coffee to help me finish off my brew kit! Any recommendations on the above, or is there another contender out there that I would be better off getting?

Thanks!

4 years, 10 months agoseevi posted on Coffee.
Nov. 17, 2014

That's interesting. I'm actually considering going away from anything posted in this thread, due to the how big they are. Trying to minimize on the size, due to the limited counter space. Considering going towards this American Weigh, but it's all up in the air at this point -- this is assuming it can handle a full load from a 6-cup chemex.

all my ferments too salty ? [R]

4 years, 10 months agoNov. 3, 2014

As the title suggests, do any of you have alternatives for making fermented vegetables (i.e sauerkraut and sweet potatoes ) ?

4 years, 10 months agotribalistic posted on fermentation.
Nov. 4, 2014

Try weighing your ingredients instead of measuring volume. Volume-based measurements don't work well for repeatable results. This $18 scale weighs fractions of a gram/oz close enough to dial in the amount of salt you prefer while still using enough to encourage lactic acid bacteria:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2

PSA: Hario Skerton is on sale on Amazon for $28.87 [R]

4 years, 10 months agod4mini0n posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 30, 2014
4 years, 10 months agod4mini0n posted on Coffee.
Oct. 31, 2014

I prefer the American Weigh Systems one, $8 cheaper and 2 kg is plenty, even for when I come close to overfilling my chemex.

Travelling Coffee Man Seeks Consistent Home Brew Kit [R]

4 years, 11 months agoSept. 26, 2014

[deleted]

4 years, 11 months agoGoGoGadgetBallGag posted on Coffee.
Sept. 26, 2014

I saw a great travel kit on this sub several months ago which included (IIRC) an AeroPress, a Porlex Mini Grinder (which fits inside of the AeroPress for easy packing!), and the BonaVita 0.5 liter Travel Kettle. I'm probably missing a component or two, but I'll poke around and see if I can find the OP.

EDIT: Here's the link!

This setup doesn't meet all your requirements, specifically the desire to make multiple cups at once, and it doesn't include a scale. I use this little bugger, as do some others on the sub, and I love it. It's super portable and I've banged it around a bit without issue. It does have an auto-shutoff feature, which can be a pain for some brewing methods.

EDIT II: Oh snap! /u/unix04 mentioned the Able Kone, which reminded me to mention the Able Disk, should you end up going the AeroPress route.

Cold Brew Coffee: Questions from A Newbie [R]

5 years, 1 month agoTarpit_Carnivore posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 13, 2014

I recently was given a taste of cold-brew coffee at a high-end coffee shop my friend made me go to, and became hooked. After I finished the bottle of concentrate I bought from them, I decided to buy some beans (Tanzanian Peaberry) and make my own. I've made three batches so far, and have lost significant weight from cold brew, with no milk or sugar, replacing Dr. Pepper as my cold caffeinated beverage of choice. I will be the first to tell you that I'm new at this, so a couple of questions:

  1. I've been using a ratio of four cups of water to one cup of ground beans (measured with a measuring cup) to make a concentrate that I put 1/3 of a cup in a glass full of ice and 2/3 cups of water but there seems to be a lot of disagreement about this, and I was wondering if anyone can help me sort through the multiple opinions. I've seen people recommend higher ratios, (as much as a pound of coffee for 8 cups) but I am poor and I want to stretch my beans purchase as much as I can, and don't want to use too much coffee unnecessarily. As long as I'm paying significantly less than a dollar a day for my morning drink (the beans are 20$ for 2 pounds), I suppose that would be worthwhile. It does seem to me, though, that my coffee is not as good as the one I had in that coffee shop, though I don't know if that's because I'm watering it down too much or my beans are not as good or as fresh as theirs.

  2. I can't find many recipes that measure the coffee in terms of cups or tablespoons, because many seem to prefer measuring the coffee in weight. I realize that that is probably a better way to measure, but my wife is already concerned that I'm blowing all our money on my newfound coffee snobbery (I bought a cheapish coffee grinder on an impulse last week), so I'm gonna hold off on buying a scale right now. Can anyone either tell me a recipe that's in terms of cups, even tablespoons, or tell me approximately how much ground coffee there is per oz? Even better would be to know how much ground coffee is produced per tablespoon of beans (if I'm using a coarse grind.)

  3. Does anyone have an effective way of filtering the grounds out? The first time I made it I just put it through a mesh strainer and there was a large amount of grounds sitting around in my drink. So, right now I pour the cold brew out through a fine mesh strainer into a pitcher, and then pour the pitcher through a paper filter that's over a funnel into a glass stopper bottle (the same bottle the original cold brew came in, though I think I'm going to start using a bourbon bottle because why the hell not(if anyone has a reason why the hell not, I suppose you should tell me)). This is effective, but takes a really long time, and becomes something to devote an afternoon to. Does anyone know of a quicker way to do this? I've seen people use coffee filters to make "coffeebags", but does hinder the brew in any way by not allowing the grounds to fully brew in the water?

  4. I noticed the last time I made it that the coffee seemed to get a little sour after about a week or so of chilling in my fridge. Is this preventable? Or is this just the downside of buying beans in bulk and brewing them way after they've been roasted and/or the bag has been opened? Related to this, I've been storing them in the original bag kept closed with a bag clip (the kind you would use to keep a bag of potato chips fresh). Should I be storing them in a container instead?

Please forgive my total ignorance, I just am an endless tinkerer and want to get the best possible drink I can get within my means. Any other general tips on cold brewing or links that are especially useful would be appreciated as well.

EDIT: Formatting

5 years, 1 month agoTarpit_Carnivore posted on Coffee.
Aug. 13, 2014

$20 for an adequate scale that can do grams and ounces. You should be measuring all of your coffee weight with a scale, cups wont cut it.

I calorie count. Anyone know how I can weigh food while on travel or on the go? Should I bring my food scale with me in my car? [R]

5 years, 1 month agobob_mcbob posted submission on loseit.
July 27, 2014

So I calorie count, and sometimes I make day trips to other cities. I do pack meals in a lunchbox, but I would like to pick up foods to eat at local grocery stores. I need my trusty food scale on my travels. Does anyone have a solution to needing to weigh food while traveling?

Should I have two food scales, one for home and one for the car?

Does anyone have any experience weighing food in a car? How is it done? On the passenger seat? On the dash? On the hood? I think I need a flat surface. Should I buy a small folding table and put it in my trunk?

5 years, 1 month agobob_mcbob posted on loseit.
July 27, 2014

Get yourself a little portable scale with a good capacity like this.

Rancilio Silvia Acquired!! Help? [R]

5 years, 2 months agoelliottok posted submission on Coffee.
July 12, 2014

Hey guys ! Just got my wish granted and received a Silvia as a wedding gift! As far as equipment that's all I have so I was wondering if I could get some input to what gear works well with it. I have no espresso grinder, tamper, knockbox, beans, milk pitcher.

Any input is great really. Any tips or tricks you've figured out while using it is greatly appreciated.

I'm on my honeymoon right now but when I get back home I'm gonna be using it like a madman! Thanks!

5 years, 2 months agoelliottok posted on Coffee.
July 13, 2014

Does your Silvia have a PID installed?

As far as gear goes, here are my recommendations:

Grinder: Baratza Vario - refurb if you can get it from Baratza's website.

Tamper: I like Clive Coffee's Tampers. They're around the same price as a Reg Barber, but I like the way they feel and look a lot more. Here's a link.

Knockbox: Rattleware has some good ones, but basically any knockbox will do.

Milk Pitcher: 12 oz. Rattleware for Capps and smaller drinks. If you're going to be making lattes, then you'll want a 20 oz. pitcher.

Beans: If you've got any good quality, local coffee shops in your area, then try their stuff. See what you like and what you don't. If there isn't much available locally, then there are plenty of online retailers. I've recently been buying from Sterling Coffee Roasters in Portland, OR because they offer free shipping and have great coffee. But like I said there are tons of choices for beans.

Scale: Definitely get a scale. Weighing each dose is probably the best way to pull consistent shots day after day. It's easy - just put portafilter on scale to zero before you grind into the portafilter. Then grind into portafilter and weigh when it looks close. I would start with 19 gram doses if I were you. I like this scale from AWS..

Get a thermometer - any good insta-read thermometer will do.

Get a stiff bristled brush for cleaning the group head, like this one.

Get some Cafiza for back flushing the group head every few weeks.

Get some Dezcal for descaling the boiler a couple of times per year.

Get a bottomless portafilter at some point.

You may want to look into purchasing one of the VST portafilter baskets. The ones that come with the Silvia are not very good.

Honestly, my real advice would be to take back the machine, get cash or store credit, and put that money towards a Breville Dual Boiler 920XL. The Breville comes with a 2 year warranty, and includes quality baskets, milk pitcher, tamper, and water filter. It's about double the price of the Silvia, but it has so many more features that it's more than worth it. I bought a Silvia as my first machine and it took me only a few months before I decided to upgrade. It's a fun little machine, but it's extremely outdated and way over priced for what you're getting.

Ketogenic DIY soylent (happens to be vegetarian) [R]

5 years, 7 months agoHDE01 posted submission on vegetarianketo.
Feb. 8, 2014

So I've been doing keto for about a month now, and I'm using DIY soylent as the basis for this dietary change. I had been consuming soylent almost exclusively since October, so switching to a ketogenic diet simply required changing the formula.

I've created a total of 3 keto soylent recipes, 2 of which are worth flagging here: "Ketofood" and "Java Ketofood."

I've been using the "Java" version for the last week or so, and it's designed to be tastier than the original.

Just thought I'd share when I saw the vegetarianketo subreddit -- I'm not deliberately vegetarian, but I had always found the idea of following a ketogenic diet rather daunting until I started doing it this way. So if it works for others too, great!

5 years, 2 months agoHDE01 posted on vegetarianketo.
July 8, 2014

I can attest to the quality of QuidNYC's Ketogenic Soylent formula. I'm currently sipping on my own variation on his concoction. It's quite different from eating "real food", but it only takes a few days before your brain finally goes "Ok, this isn't that bad, I can do this no problem".

The major benefit of Soylent for the Ketogenic Diet is that it can be a little daunting for beginners to keep track of everything, so this is a great way to make sure you are getting the right amount of calories, protein, carbs, fats (not to mention all the micronutrients). You don't have to think about food at all. Just blend and drink and food is not a consideration.

Warning: Soylent is pretty boring unless you get the flavor right. Some might think of Soylent Keto as "training wheels". It helps get you through induction by making sure you have the right calories, macros, and as long as you have good levels of mag, potassium, and sodium, you should be able to get away with less low-carb flu symptoms. Eventually, I found myself wanting to eat real food again (avocados, eggs, salad, etc..) So, I find myself sometimes doing Soylent while I'm at work, and having a "real dinner", and eating solid food on the weekends. It's working out pretty well for me and made Keto a lot easier in the beginning.

Regarding the HUGE Initial Investment for ingredients: I tend to go extreme and spent about $400 to get all the bulk items up front. I would NOT recommend this - Yes, you will save some money buying larger quantities, but there is a good chance you'll end up deciding that you don't like something, and will want to remove it from the formula. Then you're left with an expensive, worthless, 25lbs bag of coconut flour. I strongly recommend buying small quantities of each ingredient first. Once you've settled on your formula, then go ahead and do bulk purchases.

You'll need a food scale, preferably one that measures in 0.1g increments to measure the ingredients accurately. I tried 3 from Amazon before settling on this one (it was large enough to work with various containers, and seemed more accurate than others I tried): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=ohdetailso06s00i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Scale-ing mount Coffee [R]

5 years, 3 months agotr41t0r posted submission on Coffee.
June 11, 2014

So my next upgrade is to be a scale. i currently have a cheap, 1g min scale that use useless for dialing in and general pour-overs.

I understand that most people here love American weigh, but they tend to be hard to get hold of here in the UK. I like the look of the Hario, but have heard its a little slow in its response time? (i just like the idea of combining it with the drip tray and stand for a V60, but i can see why the price would be off putting)

SO- /r/Coffee, whats your ultimate scale recommendation, and why?

5 years, 3 months agotr41t0r posted on Coffee.
June 11, 2014

I use this for my chemex, aeropress, and espresso.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=ohdetailso00s00i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Homemade Dumplings! [R]

5 years, 3 months agocaptainblackout posted submission on drunkencookery.
May 27, 2014
5 years, 3 months agocaptainblackout posted on drunkencookery.
May 30, 2014

Found it on them internets. Amazon to be specific. This particular model can measure down to the tenth of the gram, or 0.1g, though some I saw when browsing were able to measure in milligrams, but had a lower weight capacity, so it's a bit of a tradeoff.

[MOD] The Official Noob-Tastic Question Fest [R]

5 years, 3 months agoan_imaginary_friend posted submission on Coffee.
May 23, 2014

Welcome to the weekly /r/coffee question thread!

There are no stupid questions here, ask a question and get an answer! We all have to start somewhere and sometimes it is hard to figure out just what you are doing right or doing wrong. Luckily the /r/coffee community loves to help out.

Do you have a question about how to use a specific piece of gear? Want to know how much coffee you should use or how you should grind it? Not sure about how much water you should use or how hot it should be? Wondering about your coffee's shelf life?

Don't forget we have some great starter guides on our wiki "Guides" page and here is the wiki "Gear By Price" page if you'd like to see coffee gear that /r/coffee members recommend.

If you're just catching this thread after a couple of days and your question doesn't get answered, just pop back in next week on the same day and ask again. Everyone visiting, please at some point scroll to the bottom of the thread to check out the newest questions, thanks!

As always, be nice!

5 years, 3 months agoan_imaginary_friend posted on Coffee.
May 26, 2014

You're pretty spot on with the CJ-4000. Great scale, solidly built, reads pretty quickly. Use it at work all the time.

Never used the AMW-2000, but the scale I use at home, and the one recommended on this sub, is this one. Same weight limit, but a much smaller footprint. Still fits a 6-cup Chemex and 8-cup french press without an issue. Bit cheaper too. Doesn't read as quickly as the CJ-4000, but you get a feel for it soon enough. Very reliable.

As for the .5g vs .1g accuracy, I've personally found it doesn't make a huge enough difference for most people to stress over it too much. If you're also planning to use the scale for cooking too, I'd go with the CJ-4000 for the higher capacity.

Method for the fullest bodied coffee? [R]

5 years, 4 months agoCameronMV posted submission on Coffee.
April 28, 2014

Hey Guys,

So I'm looking at expanding my brewing repertoire and just trying to figure out what to get. I already own a V60 and a french press, so I have two basics covered. Now comes the catch.

For my morning coffee I like the fullest bodied, dirtiest cup of a tropical roast I can get. An example of this is that I have been brewing my morning cup with my french press and the largest grind my encore can do (which admittedly is not as even as I would like). This does end up with a bit of sludge in the last sip of the cup, but it also produces a cup that is almost creamy. I would like to maintain this consistency with the new method as the majority of coffee I drink is in the morning, and I'm not 100% sure what direction to go.

I have considered the AeroPress (a favorite around here), clever coffee pot, and maybe even trying a mocha pot (but that would have to wait as I don't have a stove this year). My only worry is that the aero press will not brew me as full of a coffee as I would like (but Im unsure). I havent used the clever coffee pot either, but it does seem intriguing. The mocha pot is simply because I find it a nice intermediary between a black coffee and espresso. What would you guys go with (im open to other options as well) and why?

Thanks in Advance!

EDIT: This post was much longer than I planned. TL;DR is what method would you recommend to accentuate the body of a coffee?

5 years, 4 months agoCameronMV posted on Coffee.
April 29, 2014

That's awesome, good luck on finals! I love your plan of action, I wouldn't change a thing. This is a cheap gram scale that I and many other people use to weigh their beans. Also, what kind of grinder do you have? This will be a fun experiment to watch! I'd imagine that the way you scoop off the bloom will be a huge factor in your method.

[Gear] 0.1 Resolution Small Scale on sale for under $10 (I bought one in Feb. I love it and use it everyday) [R]

5 years, 4 months agofrojoe27 posted submission on Coffee.
April 22, 2014
5 years, 4 months agofrojoe27 posted on Coffee.
April 22, 2014

For 20 you can get this one from the same company: http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2

Its a little bigger(I put the entire hand grinder on it to measure coffee and the entire pour over on it to measure water). The 2KG max capacity is also helpful for other cooking and baking measurements.

Just another option, for me the bigger one is better but for just espresso the small one might be more convenient.

[Equipment] Scales, the unsung heroes [R]

5 years, 5 months ago0x6d1e posted submission on Coffee.
April 14, 2014

Hi All,

Following this r/coffee has convinced me that I need to buy a scale and start taking my coffee consumption to a whole new level (of quality, not quantity... but also maybe quantity).

I have received as gifts a siphon and a French Press, which I will have to play with - but this is about SCALES.

My question is: Is there a difference in scales in terms of coffee making? People back and forth on here about all manner of gear but everyone just seems to have "a scale"... can you just get any old thing?

Thanks for the help, more questions to come in the future.

5 years, 5 months ago0x6d1e posted on Coffee.
April 14, 2014

You want something:

  • reasonably accurate (0.1g)
  • uses standard batteries if possible
  • easy to clean (stainless)
  • water resistant in case of spills

I had a "kitchen scale" for a while and was unhappy with it. I ended up with this American Weigh Scales device, and while I wouldn't put it in a competition or a coffee shop, I've been extremely happy with it for both roasting and brewing.

Gram scale for espresso shot? [R]

5 years, 5 months agoApril 7, 2014

[deleted]

5 years, 5 months agomavandeh posted on Coffee.
April 7, 2014

Yes. This is the best scale I've ever owned for this purpose. No, I do not work for American Weigh.

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?ie=UTF8&qid=1396921433&sr=8-2&keywords=american+weigh+2000

Suggestions for shot scales [R]

5 years, 5 months agodannoffs1 posted submission on Coffee.
April 1, 2014

I'm looking to buy a couple of tiny scales to use for weighing shots. Anyone have any suggestions for ones that are water resistant and small enough?

5 years, 5 months agodannoffs1 posted on Coffee.
April 1, 2014

We use these in the shop. As long as you're not reckless in your espresso routine you shouldn't be getting more than a few drops of espresso on them, which you can just wipe off.

[MOD] Show off your gear! - Battle-station Central [R]

5 years, 5 months agoii_amnt posted submission on Coffee.
March 26, 2014

Sorry about the delay this week. I had a 10+ hour work day setting up a start up cafe and then caught a cold and crashed the next day.

It's time for the weekly Gear Show!

Let's see your battle-stations or new purchases. Tell us what it is you have, post pictures if you want, let us know what you think and how you use it all to make your daily Cup of Joe.

Feel free to post links to where people can get the gear but please no sketchy deal sites and none of those Amazon (or other site) links where you get a percentage if people buy it, they will be removed.

Also, if you want battle-stations every day of the week instead of just Monday's, check out /r/coffeestations!

Thanks!

5 years, 5 months agoii_amnt posted on Coffee.
March 28, 2014

My modest setup. http://i.imgur.com/5b6PoiZ.jpg

Picking up this guy in the near future. Next on the list is a Moka Pot!

One of my problems with MFP [R]

5 years, 6 months agoJereHakala posted submission on keto.
March 19, 2014

http://imgur.com/WPD5QMd

p.s. what's the best slice of beef that the ratio between fat/protein is almost equal. because according to MFP, my protein's way over the limit now. I might just stick with chuck steak.

update: with 4 confirmations, I ended up using this for my food diary http://www.myfitnesspal.com/food/calories/meat-ribeye-steak-111474886

5 years, 6 months agoJereHakala posted on keto.
March 20, 2014

This scale is excellent, I paid the full price and its definitely worth even that :) It's bit fiddly if you want to put a plate or something on it because it's so small, so I just put a glass and then plate on top of the glass to measure cooked food etc.

This might be good too.

What is your favorite and most accurate scale to use? [R]

5 years, 6 months agogorignak_gorignak posted submission on barista.
March 5, 2014

I'm trying to find a scale to buy

5 years, 6 months agogorignak_gorignak posted on barista.
March 6, 2014

For espresso, we use these and they're great. They have a .1g resolution, fit comfortably on a drip tray, and they're backlit.

Now what? [R]

5 years, 6 months agoclay_target_clubs posted submission on Coffee.
Feb. 25, 2014

Got a grinder - Breville BCG800BSXL Smart Grinder Coffee Machine:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B00DS4767A/ref=oh_details_o01_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Got a kettle - Bonavita 1-Liter Variable Temperature Digital Electric Gooseneck Kettle:

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B005YR0F40/ref=oh_details_o00_s00_i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Have a Bee House small ceramic for my pour over and a French press. Bought a popcorn popper and Sweet Maria's sampler...

Obviously I need to improve my roasting and brewing techniques but curious if any comments on where to improve next.

Brew on.

5 years, 6 months agoclay_target_clubs posted on Coffee.
Feb. 25, 2014

You also will need a scale: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=ohdetailso04s00i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

Start a journal with: coffee bean type/roast, grind setting, water temp, coffee amount, water amount (during bloom and final amount), and tasting notes (weak/strong, bitter/sour). Change one variable at a time till you get a cup you like. and circle it so you can find that perfect cup for next time. There are to many variables to try and remember them all, write them down.

Reasonably Priced and Reliable Kitchen Scale? [R]

5 years, 7 months agoFeb. 18, 2014

[deleted]

5 years, 7 months agoJapanNow posted on EatCheapAndHealthy.
Feb. 18, 2014

This one has been recommended on Reddit in the past.

What kind of scale should I get? [R]

5 years, 7 months agoFeb. 14, 2014

I don't have a good grasp of what I'm going to be up against once I receive my order, so it's difficult to assess what kind of scale I need. I looked on Amazon and there were pocket size scales with high precision (are they too small?), and then there were kitchen scales (sounds appropriate by name, but I'm not exactly weighing bread). I know the precision is supposed to be .01.

Any recommendations? I'd prefer to buy this on Amazon, since that's where I'm going to buy the ingredients. A link to a scale that would be appropriate for making soylent would be incredibly useful.

Thanks!

5 years, 7 months agoSteelSeraph posted on soylent.
Feb. 15, 2014

I picked up this http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ It's been pretty good for me so far, and the 2kg limit is more than enough (was having trouble when I was first mixing with a 1kg limit, mostly because it didn't like the bowl and the mix on it at the same time :))

Best pocket scale [R]

5 years, 7 months agoemptymatrix posted submission on Coffee.
Feb. 14, 2014

Hey r/Coffee

I'm looking for a new digital scale. I need it to be able to fit on the drip tray grate of a Gaggia Baby, have a resolution of 0.1 grams, have a 500 gram max minimum, and be under $50 bucks. Help?

Thanks all!

5 years, 7 months agoemptymatrix posted on Coffee.
Feb. 14, 2014

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale

EDIT: not sure about "fit on the drip tray grate of a Gaggia Baby"

Scales? [R]

5 years, 7 months agoFeb. 9, 2014

[deleted]

5 years, 7 months agofrippe79 posted on Breadit.
Feb. 9, 2014

I haven't tried this one for baking, but it works for coffee brewing. Maximum weight is 2Kg and it costs 20$ + S&H at Amazon.

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmrdpproduct

IIRC American Weight Scale has a few different models.

What do I do? [R]

5 years, 7 months agomenschmaschine5 posted submission on Coffee.
Feb. 5, 2014

I'm a coffee newbie. I recently discovered we have a French press in the house, and so some pre-ground coffee beans were bought for use with it. It wasn't this exact product, but same sort of thing: http://www.douwe-egberts.co.uk/products/ground1/ground/classic-blend/. I've made coffee like the guy in this video does: http://youtube.com/watch?v=YIKr2EMkm48 and the difference between the resulting coffee and the Nescafé instant I'm used to is quite remarkable. However I get the feeling from browsing this subreddit that I've still got some way to go before getting the perfect cup of joe.

What do I do next to step up my coffee game?

5 years, 7 months agomenschmaschine5 posted on Coffee.
Feb. 5, 2014

Get a grinder and a scale. The scale is cheap (I use [this] (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?ie=UTF8&qid=1391650706&sr=8-2&keywords=american+weigh) one and it does the job, although it costs a bit more than I usually see), the grinder is not ($130 for an entry level electric [Baratza Encore], or you can get a decent hand grinder for $40 [Porlex JP 30/Mini]).

Aeropress Ratios [R]

5 years, 7 months agobrimo2k posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 21, 2014

Hey all! I just recently stepped up my coffee setup, adding an Aeropress and a Baratza Preciso to my mornings. I've been working with the Aeropress for a couple of days now, and, while it's produced a good cup of coffee so far, I think I need some help on ratios. I typically take a 16 oz. tumbler in the mornings, and most of the ratios I've found are for a much smaller cup of coffee. So, I'd love to hear what ratios you professionals would use when making enough coffee for a 16oz mug.

I've thus far been using about two Aeropress scoops of whole beans, but I've found the coffee to be a bit weak. I'm looking for suggestions as to

(a) how many scoops I should be using,

(b) how much water I should use for steeping prior to plunging, and

(c) approximately how much additional water to add after plunging to result in ~16 oz (probably more like 14 with some room in the mug).

Thanks in advance!

5 years, 7 months agobrimo2k posted on Coffee.
Jan. 22, 2014

American Weigh Scales AMW-SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale by American Weigh http://www.amazon.com/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=cmswrudpawd_Za13sb15RMF81

Recommendations for scales. [R]

5 years, 7 months agoJan. 20, 2014

[deleted]

5 years, 7 months agoogunther posted on Coffee.
Jan. 20, 2014

This is the scale I have and that /r/coffee tends to recommend but it is on the small side (I have a 10 cup Chemex that fits on it just fine but the Chemex overhangs it). Not sure if it would be big enough for weighing packages depending on their size.

http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2

Is this Taylor Mechanical Scale good enough? [R]

5 years, 8 months agoogunther posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 19, 2014

I've been measuring out coffee (2 tbsp to 6 oz) for a while. I've read quite a bit about the importance of weighing out grounds and water. Is this cheap scale good enough, or should I spend more on a better scale?

5 years, 8 months agoogunther posted on Coffee.
Jan. 19, 2014

I don't know anything about that specific scale but those types of scales are notoriously inaccurate, especially for minute weight changes such as you'd want for measuring beans. This is the scale I and many /r/coffee readers recommend (and it's only about $20): http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2

The other benefits to this type of scale is you can do your pour overs right on it so that you can weigh your water as well.

[Question] Best coffee experience for the least money? [R]

5 years, 8 months agoogunther posted submission on Coffee.
Jan. 12, 2014

Hi, I'm a high school senior and I recently began drinking coffee to help out a little, but the coffee machine my parents own is subpar at best, so what's something I could buy on Amazon that could enhance my coffee experience? What roasts do you recommend? And also, is it safe to store coffee grounds in a ziploc bag?

Thank you for your time.

5 years, 8 months agoogunther posted on Coffee.
Jan. 12, 2014

You've already got most of the advice I was going to give from both /u/jkjljlkjljlkjlkj & /u/EspressoMyEspresso so I'll just add that for the money, I prefer the Aeropress over the French Press but it's a personal preference thing and both can make great coffee. Another brew method to consider would be a smaller Chemex which can sometimes be had for under $30 on sale.

The other coffee equipment you'll eventually want (sooner than later) is a good scale (the AMS scale is pretty popular and only $20 - http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/) and a good kettle (goosenecks are the prefered ones but aren't really needed for French Press or Aeropress brewing).

[Photos] Purty photos of my brewing process + Review of Hario Mill Slim and Hario Drip Scale-Timer [R]

5 years, 8 months agoJan. 9, 2014

[deleted]

5 years, 8 months agotwobrain posted on Coffee.
Jan. 10, 2014

http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-SC-2KG-Digital-Pocket/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?ie=UTF8&qid=1351190470&sr=8-2&keywords=American+Weigh+Digital+Scale+2kg

What is one thing I can get on amazon to expand my coffee experience? [R]

5 years, 8 months agoDec. 30, 2013

[deleted]

5 years, 8 months agoGoGoGadgetBallGag posted on Coffee.
Dec. 30, 2013

I recently began using a scale, this one, and my coffee has been more consistent. By ensuring that my ratio is correct, I am able to focus on other variables in the brewing process. You'll surely find one useful if you plan to explore pour-over methods, as you can place the vessel directly on the scale while you pour.

French Press Question [R]

5 years, 8 months agodanny31292 posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 29, 2013

Hey everyone! I just got a French Press as a Christmas present, and was really excited to use it, however, I'm running into some difficulties with it. The coffee that I'm making is pretty watered down and weak. Here is how I go about using the French Press: I boil water, add a tablespoon of coarsely ground coffee (coarsely ground in the grocery store grinder) per 6 oz cup of water, stir gently, let it sit for 4 minutes, then press down slowly and drink.

What am I doing wrong, if anyone knows? Is the coffee ground too coarse/fine? Does the brand of the French Press I have affect the outcome (which I doubt, but the type of press is a Bonjour French Press for reference)? I appreciate any info or tips!

edit: I appreciate all the advice!

5 years, 8 months agodanny31292 posted on Coffee.
Dec. 29, 2013

Finally got a nice, durable set for doing small gongfu style steepings at work. [R]

5 years, 8 months agoJereHakala posted submission on tea.
Dec. 26, 2013
5 years, 8 months agoJereHakala posted on tea.
Dec. 27, 2013

I use this scale for my coffee and tea, fits a french press for example nicely, and is precise for weighing out beans etc.

[Gear] What to look for in a scale? [R]

5 years, 8 months agomenschmaschine5 posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 26, 2013

Noticing that scales seem to be used for a lot of coffee-related things so was wondering what are good and bad traits of scales to consider when looking for one to purchase?

5 years, 8 months agomenschmaschine5 posted on Coffee.
Dec. 26, 2013

Not much, really. As long as it's accurate, has a "tare" button, and is accurate down to a half a gram at least, you're golden as long as you're not doing espresso (.1 gram accuracy is only necessary when brewing espresso - or more, if you find a scale accurate to .01 grams).

[This] (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-Scales-AMW-SC-2KG-Digital/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr14?ie=UTF8&qid=1388099663&sr=8-4&keywords=american+weigh) is the one I have, and it works pretty well. It's cheap, lightweight, and accurate to .1 grams. The only real drawback is that its maximum capacity is 2 kg, but I've never run into that brewing with an Aeropress, an 8 cup Chemex, an 8 cup French Press, or a size 02 Hario V60 (with an 03 server).

Big Xmas/Holiday Gift Thread - Ask questions, make suggestions, share what you bought this season! [R]

5 years, 9 months agodriftw00d posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 16, 2013

Hey everyone!

It's about that time of year and I'm thinking maybe we could be pro-active here. I think this would be a great way to bring a lot of holiday buying questions into one place but also make suggestions or share what you've bought the coffee lovers in your life, so:

  1. Ask a question, what should I buy? - What's your budget, who are you buying for and what do you know about their current coffee habits?

  2. What would you suggest buying people? - Seen any good deals recently, got some good coffee roasters to suggest, any great equipment that you swear by?

  3. Tell your story - What did you buy, who did you buy it for?

5 years, 9 months agodriftw00d posted on Coffee.
Dec. 16, 2013

I bought this Bottomless Portafilter as an upgrade to the CC1. Not a necessity by any means but the extraction just looks awesome. Really, I still stare at the entirety of every single shot since getting it. And on the more practical side it will let you know quickly if you had a problem during your distribution or tamping.

If you're after a scale recommendation this American Weight Scale 0.1g I am well pleased with.

The importance of a scale... [R]

5 years, 9 months agobannana posted submission on Coffee.
Dec. 3, 2013

I've been brewing via V-60 for about a month now, at first I had some great results but slowly began to realize my coffee tasted like shit, despite my efforts to purchase freshly roasted beans. I tried different grind sizes, and pour methods but was overlooking a very important aspect of coffee brewing. That aspect to which I am referring is ratios! I manned up, and tossed myself to Target to purchased a scale with a Tare function. I had been measuring my beans by grinding them for 15 seconds, after weighing I realized I had been grinding 7 grams short every time. I rinsed my filter, added coffee and tarred again. I kept adding water until I hit 390 grams (to 26 grams of coffee) and by golly that was a good cup of joe. After my blazing victory I felt it was time to celebrate, so I kneeled down consumed two pounds of beef and whittled an axe handle.

5 years, 9 months agobannana posted on Coffee.
Dec. 3, 2013

Both pre-ground European coffees that I've tried always brew sour. Is this part of the style, a pure coincidence, or something going wrong? [R]

5 years, 9 months ago[deleted] posted submission on Coffee.
Nov. 21, 2013

I usually either roast it myself or buy from my grocery store that has a roaster on site, but I've been super busy lately and was realized I was flat out of coffee. We were at Marshalls so I grabbed a bag of Dallmayr Classic (expiration date 12/2014) which is their darker roast and according to them, very low acid. The other European brand I'm referring to is Gevalia, I heard decent things about their coffee and back when I was in college $10 for 2lb of coffee sounded pretty good.

In both cases, the brew has been sour unlike any cup I've ever brewed (other than those two I've never really bought pre-ground coffee).

The Gevalia coffee I got four different varieties and I tried two hoping the first one was a bad batch and gave away the other two bags (so much for saving money, lol).

That coffee is long gone, so I'd just like to figure out if I can changed something to make the Dallmayr I got a few days taste better.

Here's some details about my brewing process:

  1. I wet the filter.
  2. I place about 3 tablespoons of coffee in.
  3. I wet the grounds and wait 30-60 seconds.
  4. I start pouring 9.5oz of water into my mug keeping the water level at about 2/3.

And that's it. Should I adjust anything? The only two variables that I notice is the coffee to water ratio and the water level on the filter. Or is it potentially caused by uncontrollable variables like coffee age or how finely ground it is? Or something I'm unaware of?

Thanks.

5 years, 9 months ago[deleted] posted on Coffee.
Nov. 21, 2013

Stale coffee makes it taste flatter and less flavorful. It will probably change the extraction rates but I can't say definitively because I've never actually experimented with staleness vs. extraction. The scale just gets better consistency compared to eyeballing to help nail down your ratios. Not to mention if you're using fresh coffee the tablespoons will differ from whole bean to ground coffee. I usually measure the whole bean in grams before grinding. Then I grind and then brew, getting it as fresh as possible. If you're having trouble with scales I have this one and I love it. To help with extraction ratios I recommend the app mojotogo by vst coffeetools. It's free for the initial but the coffee lite upgrade is $4.99 if memory serves me right. It's worth it as a nice tool for your ratios with the option to save recipes.

Any home roasters out there? [R]

5 years, 10 months agoecib posted submission on Coffee.
Oct. 29, 2013

I'm trying to roast my own coffee at home! What was your first method of roasting? How long have you been roasting for? Any tips/suggestions?

5 years, 10 months agoecib posted on Coffee.
Oct. 29, 2013

Hi socialBookmarker, I roast at home and have been for a little less than a year.

I've found home roasting to be easy, affordable, accessible, and less complicated and laborious than many other types of cooking you do in the kitchen.

My tools:

  • A $20 dollar West Bend Air Crazy popcorn popper from Target. I did a quick modification to it by removing the internal thermostat so that the machine can roast darker to second crack. If you have a screwdriver and 10 minutes you can do it too, -I made a pictorial set of instructions HERE

  • A metal colander from my kitchen (normally used to strain pasta).

  • Timer on my phone (just to keep notes and keep my attention focused around when 1st and 2nd crack usually happen.

  • This little kitchen scale. I didn't use a scale for months, -it's not really so needed, but once I learned that I liked home roasting enough to keep doing it it became a good investment.

My tips:

Watch this how to video over at Sweet Maria's to see how to do it more concisely than I could show you here with text.

You can also poke around the home roast air popper forums if you want.

My only main tip is really, -do this outside. Crazy crazy amounts of smoke. Other than that, the most important thing is just to go out an do it. On your first roasts, I suggest NOT aiming for a light roast, but instead taking it all the way to second crack and maybe a bit beyond. Even if you don't normally roast that dark, this educates you on your specific machine and how long it takes to get to the various stages. Some of these machines run hot and you almost can't distinguish 1st and 2nd crack as the former bleeds right into the latter. Other machines have the opposite problem (nit hitting 2nd crack at all without a mod). Use the stopwatch on your phone to tick off a lap at beginning of first crack, and beginning of 2nd. Do that a couple more roasts and learn roughly when they occur, then from there use that information to target the roast you want.

Enjoy the hands on trial and error and have fun! There really isn't a wrong way to do it when you're learning from everything you do.

[question] What scale do you use? [R]

5 years, 11 months agoOct. 7, 2013

I have pretty crappy kitchen scale that I bought for maybe $8. Its accurate within 2-3 grams from what I can tell, but the more I "get into" coffee, the more I realize it's holding me back a bit. There's no point in having over a hundred dollars worth of gear rely on a crap scale. That being said, what's a nice, but not insanely expensive 0.001g accurate scale that I can put my whole pourover set up on? I've been looking at the Hario one, but it seems a bit pricey

5 years, 11 months agoecib posted on Coffee.
Oct. 7, 2013

This guy right here.

Easy to read, has tare function, accurate withing 1 gram, comes with two weighing trays (uh...cause you don't own any small cups or bowls, right?), and 10 year warranty. Also weighs up to about 4.5 lbs, so I can use it for other stuff.

Had for a little less than a year and tested it with a 50g calibration weight recently and it was still dead on. So far so good. This thing has been a functional champ so far.

Some questions about brewing with an Aeropress and grind. [R]

5 years, 12 months agoShadySkins posted submission on Coffee.
Sept. 19, 2013

Hey guys, I recently bought an aeropress, and I love it. I decided to upgrade to a Bodum Bistro Burr Grinder based on the recommendations in the Wiki. It's an awesome grinder and grinds consistently so far, but I'm having trouple figuring out a proper setting to use with my aeropress. My water is at around 175 F when brewing. The coffee is much better than anything preground, but I feel like there is something I could be doing to make it better. I'm currently using some Ethiopian beans a friend gifted to me with a roast date of 9/12/13. Any advice would be greatly appreciated!

Edit: Thanks for all of the great advice guys! I'll play around with my temperature and grind size. As a few users have noticed, my temp was so low due to following the instruction manual included (looks like that was a poor life choice). Anyway, thanks for the help! I'm looking forward to the process of improving my brewing methods.

5 years, 12 months agoShadySkins posted on Coffee.
Sept. 20, 2013

I'm currently on my second American Weigh SC-2KG. Unfortunately the LCD failed on the first one. I still think it is a solid scale for the cost. I use it 3 times a day or more.

[Question] Measuring beans/water without a scale? [R]

6 years agoSept. 12, 2013

I'm about to start using a 3-cup Chemex pot with some fresh roasted beans that I'll be grinding myself using a burr grinder. I've tried to do a lot of reading about how to best prepare and brew using this method, but I don't have a scale to measure things like the water and ground beans. Is there a way to do it without a scale? Or should I suck it up, drive to Target and pick one up?

Sidenote: I'm inexperienced with coffee and brewing coffee in general. I'm just starting to get into the home brewing scene and I want to do it right. I'm also a precise guy.

Edit: Thanks for all the tips guys! So I'll definitely be getting a scale, might just have to wait till payday to make that happen.

6 years agomenschmaschine5 posted on Coffee.
Sept. 12, 2013

You can ballpark it, but the only way to be precise is to weigh your coffee. I use [this] (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-SC-2KG-Digital-Pocket/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?s=kitchen&srs=2528924011&ie=UTF8&qid=1379030551&sr=1-2&keywords=american+weigh) one. It's only 20 bucks (although I swear it was 15 when I bought it...), accurate to .1 gram, and works very well. The only drawbacks are its small size and weight limit of 2 kg, but neither of those have ever been a problem for me (with an Aeropress, an 8 cup French Press, and an 8 cup Chemex).

[Question] Measuring beans/water without a scale? [R]

6 years agoSept. 12, 2013

I'm about to start using a 3-cup Chemex pot with some fresh roasted beans that I'll be grinding myself using a burr grinder. I've tried to do a lot of reading about how to best prepare and brew using this method, but I don't have a scale to measure things like the water and ground beans. Is there a way to do it without a scale? Or should I suck it up, drive to Target and pick one up?

Sidenote: I'm inexperienced with coffee and brewing coffee in general. I'm just starting to get into the home brewing scene and I want to do it right. I'm also a precise guy.

Edit: Thanks for all the tips guys! So I'll definitely be getting a scale, might just have to wait till payday to make that happen.

6 years agomrcandyman posted on Coffee.
Sept. 12, 2013

A scale it totally worth the minimal cost. I use and love this one

Best cup of coffee for $150 [R]

6 years agouRabbit posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 29, 2013

Hey all - I've recently been granted a budget of $150 to spend in the office. I have decided that I would like to get a solid setup for a consistent cup of good coffee.

If you had $150 and absolutely zero coffee equipment, where would you start? Thanks a bunch!

edit Whoops - I lied! I do have a basic electric kettle. :)

6 years agouRabbit posted on Coffee.
Aug. 30, 2013

Total = $145 (Chemex) - $164 (Kalita Wave)

All are available on Amazon Prime as well.

Tea leaf/water ratio for teapots? [R]

6 years, 1 month ago[deleted] posted submission on tea.
Aug. 14, 2013

I recently got a 24oz teapot (David's Tea Bubble Teapot), and while I really love the pot (infuser works well, spout and handle are great), I'm not sure how much loose tea to put in. Is there a general tea/water ratio? I usually use about a spoonful of tea to make a mug, but I've been doing it so long that I can eyeball it and haven't gotten specific about measurements. Do you fill the pot all the way up with water, or leave a bit of room at the top?

6 years, 1 month ago[deleted] posted on tea.
Aug. 15, 2013

This scale is pretty great. It's accurate to .1 gram. If you don't need it to go up to 2 kg (I weigh food on mine too) the same company sells ones that max out at 1 kg for less than $10 USD.

Recommendations for a kitchen scale that measures to 0.1 gram precision? [R]

6 years, 1 month agoaschapm posted submission on AskCulinary.
Aug. 8, 2013

I don't need a milligram scale. I want a kitchen scale that I can use for measuring very small amounts (yeast, salt, and certain additives), but can still measure up to 2 KG at least. Any recommendations of scales you've tried?

6 years, 1 month agoaschapm posted on AskCulinary.
Aug. 9, 2013

this is a pretty common/inexpensive scale i use for coffee. 2kg max, 0.1g sensitivity, works great: http://www.amazon.com/gp/product/B001RF3XJ2/ref=ohdetailso00s00i00?ie=UTF8&psc=1

looking for a coffee maker for my room budget:200 [R]

6 years, 1 month agoAug. 6, 2013
6 years, 1 month agomenschmaschine5 posted on Coffee.
Aug. 6, 2013

Oh, and don't forget the electric kettle. Any will do, you don't need a fancy gooseneck one for these methods (they're helpful for freehand pour-over methods like the v-60 and Chemex).

Some kind of instant-read thermometer and a kitchen scale like [this] (http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-SC-2KG-Digital-Pocket/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr11?ie=UTF8&qid=1375817673&sr=8-1&keywords=american+weigh+2kg) will help you dial in your process and ultimately make better coffee, but aren't completely necessary.

But yes, I second either aeropress or clever dripper. They're both quick and easy methods which can make great coffee, and easy to clean (the latter is especially important for a dorm).

Reliable but inexpensive scales [R]

6 years, 1 month agoadrooo posted submission on Coffee.
Aug. 1, 2013

Do you guys have any recommendations? I use a clever and will be getting a chemex soon. What is a good scale that will be big enough to accommodate either of these brewing methods?

6 years, 1 month agoadrooo posted on Coffee.
Aug. 1, 2013

I have an American Weigh SC-2kg.

I previously had an Ozeri Pro, which was similar in price.

I love the American Weigh because it is accurate to 0.1g, which is great for espresso. However, it sacrifices maximum weight, which came in handy a few times on the Ozeri (mainly for other things in the kitchen).

If you're doing the regular 6-cup chemex (I do this with the additional weight of ice for japanese cold brew), you should be fine with the American Weigh. I'd suggest it anyways as I found the build quality a bit better, and the auto-shut off isn't triggered as quickly. It also has an awesome blue LED screen. If you're doing heavier stuff though, the Ozeri is certainly sufficient!

Novice Starting From Scratch [R]

6 years, 1 month agoan_imaginary_friend posted submission on Coffee.
July 31, 2013

On a recent trip to Toronto, I was introduced to good coffee at a local coffeeshop. Now I'm back home in Middle of Nowhere, New Jersey, and there isn't a single good shop around. I'm trying to decide what to buy as I learn to brew proper coffee.

Typically, I'll have one coffee in the morning and one in the afternoon. I've found I'm partial to espresso drinks in the afternoon, particularly triple soy mocha lattes.

Here are the lists I came up with (items I am currently likely to buy are bolded):

Essentials

I'd love to add a good french press to this list, but I'm going to save it for a future self-gift. I'm considering putting off the Able Kone for the future as well, but I'm worried that I won't like the Chemex with paper filters.

Grinders

I don't own a grinder, so I have a list of those, too. I'd like to use my grinder for all kinds of coffee. Anything from espresso to drip, if possible. Not that I'll ever make drip again, but I'd like knowing that I could. :)

I definitely like the scale on the Vario-W. The price difference between it and the Vario is less than that of a decent standalone scale, so I put it on the list.

The Mazzer Mini looks awesome, but their price is definitely verging on uncomfortable. If there is a huge difference in grind quality or product durability, I'd go for it though.

Espresso Machines

I haven't decided with certainty whether I want to buy an espresso machine just yet; I doubt I'll put it off for long though. As a coffee novice, would the machines below be a bad idea to rush into?

Final list. Espresso machines, here it goes:

  • Cheap De'Longhi (EC155). Probably just a waste of money, but gets surprisingly decent ratings from consumers.
  • Saeco Aroma. This is high on my list due to the strong price-performance ratio.
  • Gaggia 14101. I feel like this sits at a weird price point. Once I'm up to four bills, I feel like I might as well add a bit more and get a Silvia.
  • Silvia. The more I read about this, the more I like it. Build quality is top of the line. Steam is a definite worry though; see edit below.

Tamper & other little things: don't have lists for these. Any recommendations would be appreciated though!

Likely future additions:

Finally:

Beans. I have a lot of learning to do on beans. I haven't even started reading about beans - there are a ton of great guides that I'm putting off reading - but if there is anything that you really really wish someone had told you when you started learning about them, you're welcome to shout it out.

Last thing. I'm definitely willing to pay extra for good, solid products. I'm young and am hoping to buy equipment that will last a good portion of my life. That is, the rest of college, moving apartments, etc.

EDIT: Updated with new items & preferences

One concern that's come up with the Silvia is its steaming performance. Noted in HB review. I'm not really sure where to go up from a Silvia though, maybe a Silvano or an Expobar Pulser? Would it be worth my while to save up for a La Nuova Era Cuadra?

6 years, 1 month agoan_imaginary_friend posted on Coffee.
Aug. 1, 2013

Second on the separate scale. This and this are generally well regarded here. I own the first one, and I love it

Gram Scale [R]

6 years, 1 month agoShadySkins posted submission on Coffee.
July 29, 2013

Best gram scale under $50...Go.

6 years, 1 month agoShadySkins posted on Coffee.
July 30, 2013

American Weigh SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale

I just replaced my first one... which only lasted about 9 months. The LCD screen was no longer legible. However, I used this thing 2-3 times a day for 9 months. I was satisfied enough to purchase another.

What is the best Aeropress technique with a HMMS? [R]

6 years, 1 month agoJuly 27, 2013

[deleted]

6 years, 1 month agomenschmaschine5 posted on Coffee.
July 27, 2013

There are many different aeropress recipes. I don't have a hario mini, but the grind I use is medium (4 clicks on my skerton or thereabouts). The recipe I most commonly use:

Inverted, preheated aeropress

14 g of coffee (about 1.5 of those aeropress scoops, probably)

200 g water (almost to the top of the aeropress) at around 200 f

Stir for 10 seconds, stir again after 50-60 seconds and press into a mug.

I'd recommend getting one of [these] ( http://www.amazon.com/American-Weigh-SC-2KG-Digital-Pocket/dp/B001RF3XJ2/ref=sr12?s=home-garden&ie=UTF8&qid=1374963588&sr=1-2&keywords=American+weigh). Less than 20 bucks and very accurate.

Spent two hours yesterday evening at Slate Coffee Bar chatting up Brandon Weaver (NW AeroPress champ) about everything relative to coffee. [R]

6 years, 1 month agoPuristaBlog posted submission on Coffee.
July 21, 2013
6 years, 1 month agoPuristaBlog posted on Coffee.
July 23, 2013

I really recommend any American Weigh scale. There is a larger one for only $18, that fits every brew method. I have ordered it to replace our Escali.

[Contest] Something $25 or under. [R]

6 years, 2 months agoDreamOfKittehs posted submission on Random_Acts_Of_Amazon.
July 5, 2013

My city recently changed my address. So, I'm waiting for some official letter from the post office saying that I can go ahead and start using my new address. Until that happens, I can't shop online for myself. I can however, shop online for YOU! Which is what I want to do!

The Rules.

  • Link me something off your wishlist that is $25 or under, including shipping. I do have Prime, if that matters at all.

  • It must be a physical item. I want you to open a box or other shipping device and go "OMG YAAAAAAAY!!!!"

  • You have until 12am EST

I'm terrible at making decisions so I'm letting RedditRaffle do the dirty work for me so be sure to include word Yay!

Edit Contest closed! RedditRaffle has chosen I_am_your_cupcake Yaaaaay!! Bear with me, my internet is not being very nice to me at the moment..boooo!

6 years, 2 months agoDreamOfKittehs posted on Random_Acts_Of_Amazon.
July 5, 2013

A scale to use for weighing jewelry to calculate material cost more easily and to calculate shipping and print postage instead of having to go to the post office! This would really help me with my jewelry business, Yay! :D

[GEAR] Ice Coffee with Aeropress [R]

6 years, 2 months agoJereHakala posted submission on Coffee.
June 21, 2013
6 years, 2 months agoJereHakala posted on Coffee.
June 22, 2013

This scale is great and cheap currently, uses AAA batteries, 0,1g and fits french press etc. nicely.

Before I pay, am I looking at a good grinder and aeropress? [R]

6 years, 2 months agoDoubleDroz posted submission on Coffee.
June 20, 2013

http://amzn.com/w/2KG36CLFKQNOG

EDIT: Don't know why I didn't make this a link post... Was thinking about coffee not reddit.

EDIT 2: I should add that I'm on a budget.

6 years, 2 months agoDoubleDroz posted on Coffee.
June 20, 2013

That is a great and cheap place to start experimenting!

Don't know what the water's like in your neck of the woods, but I need a filter jug like a Brita.

Also - get some scales like this - cheap, more accurate than most kitchen scales, and it'll make a world of difference to weigh your water and your beans. You'd be surprised how much of a difference a few grams one way or the other make to the resulting brew.

After that - you're good to go!

[Question] Single cup personal coffee makers? [R]

6 years, 5 months agoApril 2, 2013

[deleted]

6 years, 5 months agoShadySkins posted on Coffee.
April 2, 2013

The pair. Many people come here looking for recommendations on a Keurig or drip machine and end up buying and Aeropress, Chemex or French Press paired with a good hot water kettle.

I second the Aeropress and Bonavita Variable Temp Kettle. Throw in this scale and this grinder and spend a few days reading through posts and you will be golden.

Warning - I came looking for similar recommendations and eventually this happened.

Is this a versatile beginners setup? [R]

6 years, 5 months agoShadySkins posted submission on Coffee.
March 31, 2013

I have loved coffee for a long time and I think its time to take the plunge into a better cup of coffee. I am a thinking about purchasing the following setup. Do you guys/girls think this is a good starting place? Any suggestions or criticisms?

Grinder: Baratza Preciso Coffee Grinder 685

Kettle: Bonavita 1-Liter Variable Temperature Digital Electric Gooseneck Kettle

Scale: Escali P115C Primo Digital Multifunctional Food Scale

Storage: Friis 16-Ounce Coffee Vault

Press: Aerobie AeroPress Coffee and Espresso Maker

Thanks in advance. Happy Easter if you celebrate it!

6 years, 5 months agoShadySkins posted on Coffee.
March 31, 2013

Excellent grinder and perfect if you ever move to espresso. I just got a great deal on one last month.

Excellent kettle. I have used mine daily since October 2012.

Scale - I didn't listen to /r/coffee when buying a scale and ultimately returned the one I bought for the /r/coffee recommended American Weigh SC-2KG Digital Pocket Scale and I couldn't be happier

Storage - donno - sounds good, but I used these mason jars and they work great. I keep them in a cool dark place.

I love my Aeropress!!! But, if I had to choose between my aeropress and recently acquired Chemex. I would choose Chemex. However, if I was only planning on brewing one cup at a time, the aeropress wins hands down.

Happy Easter to you too!